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Overview

body fluids

A term that includes blood, tears, sweat, serous and mucous secretions from all bodily orifices, saliva, urine, and semen. In clinical usage, the term refers to body fluids that can ...

body fluids

body fluids   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007

... fluids The watery solutions in the human body. They include intracellular fluid, tissue fluid, blood, and lymph. Body fluids make up more than half the body weight of an individual. Most metabolic reactions take place in the body fluids...

body fluids

body fluids   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Forensic Science

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Science and technology, Law
Length:
125 words

... fluids A type of evidence that can be analysed using serological and immunological techniques and in some cases, DNA typing . Body fluids and body fluid stains encountered as evidence include saliva, semen, sweat, urine, faeces, vomit, vaginal fluid, and human milk. By 1932 it was understood that there was an inherited characteristic that determined if a person secretes substances such as the A and B antigens of the ABO system into body fluids. Approximately 80 per cent of the Caucasian population are secretors, which means that their body fluids...

body fluids

body fluids   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Body

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
1,644 words

...to the capillary wall. The volumes of the body fluid compartments, in a ‘typical’ 70 kg man, are: 30 litres inside cells and 15 litres outside cells, comprising 3 litres in the plasma, 11 litres in interstitial fluid, and 1 litre in transcellular fluids. The solutes in the body fluid The partitions between these compartments (cell membranes between extracellular fluid and intracellular fluid, capillary walls between plasma and interstitial fluid, and cellular layers between interstitial fluid and transcellular fluid) are permeable to water, and hence the...

body fluids

body fluids   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Public Health (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...body fluids A term that includes blood, tears, sweat, serous and mucous secretions from all bodily orifices, saliva, urine, and semen. In clinical usage, the term refers to body fluids that can transmit infections, which tears and sweat rarely do. ...

body fluids

body fluids  

Reference type:
Overview Page
A term that includes blood, tears, sweat, serous and mucous secretions from all bodily orifices, saliva, urine, and semen. In clinical usage, the term refers to body fluids that can transmit ...
body fluid

body fluid   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Biology (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
62 words

...body fluid Any of the fluids found within animals, including blood, lymph, tissue fluid, urine, bile, sweat, and synovial fluid. Body fluids are generally involved with the processes of transport, excretion, homeostasis, or lubrication. They allow the distribution of oxygen and nutrients to the tissues and organs and the transport of waste products from the tissues, enabling their elimination from the body...

Medicine

Medicine   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
3,985 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...in medical theory and in fringe *medicine supported the Romantic collapsing of traditional mind–body dualisms, of the traditional Cartesian distinction between object and subject, and furthered the emphasis on a unitary self. Developing in Scotland from the 1750s, medical theories associated with Robert Whytt ( 1714–66 ), William Cullen ( 1710–90 ), and their followers saw health and disease as a function of the nerves. The nervous system united the body, with its nerve-endings in the extremities, with the brain and mind. The doctrine of the nervous...

Poverty

Poverty   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
6,179 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...tide them over immediate crises. Discrimination between the undeserving and the deserving had structured attitudes to the poor for many centuries, but parish officials, unlike some pamphleteers, recognized the claims of the able-bodied. Indeed, a substantial proportion of the poor rates was paid as occasional relief to the able-bodied. Periodically, parishes might establish or reform a local poorhouse or workhouse to cut the cost of poor relief, discipline the recalcitrant, or establish some form of manufacture. Important incorporation and workhouse initiatives...

A Midsummer Night’s Dream

A Midsummer Night’s Dream   Reference library

Michael Dobson and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,220 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...minimalist woods. Michael Hoffman ’s less intellectually cogent Hollywood film ( 1999 ) sets the play in 19th-century Italy, punctuating its soundtrack with famous operatic arias. Donald Calthrop as Puck (Robin Goodfellow) with the First Fairy in Harley Granville-Barker’s fluid, vivid, and colourful production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream , Savoy Theatre, 1914. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London Anthony Davies Recent major editions Recent major editions Peter Holland (Oxford, 1994); Stanley Wells (New Penguin, 1967); Harold F. Brooks (Arden 2nd...

Popular Culture

Popular Culture   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,520 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

..., c. 1500–1850 ( 1995 )—modify the prevailing model of cultural attack and resistance in several ways. First, these revisionists argue, it is misleading to see popular culture as fixed and homogeneous, whether in pre-industrial or modern forms. Rather, we should treat it as a fluid dialogical process, or at least as a field of study characterized by considerable pluralism arising from regional, sectional, and above all gender differences. Second, they argue, conventional bipolar divisions between élite and popular, polite and vulgar, or pre-industrial and...

Diminutives

Diminutives   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
1,364 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...egg-shaped lobe of the cerebellum) globule (= a small round particle; a drop) granule (= a small grain; a pellet) homunculus (= a small person or humanoid being) molecule (= the smallest fundamental unit for a chemical reaction) nodule (= a small swelling in the body) sacculus (= the smaller of two fluid-filled sacs in the inner ear) C. - el . This French suffix traditionally denotes something small or of no great importance. It first appeared in the 13th century. bowel (= small intestine) chapel (= a small building for religious worship) hovel (= a wretched...

fluid balance

fluid balance  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(floo-id)the state in which the amount of fluid in the body is such as to enable normal physiological functioning. The volume of fluid taken in and excreted over 24 hours should be equal, so that the ...
fluid resistance

fluid resistance  

Resistance to motion of a body in a fluid due to forces of friction being exerted between the body and the fluid. Fluid resistance is directly proportional to the cross-sectional area of a body at ...
fluid shift

fluid shift  

A shift in the distribution of human body fluids due to the effects of microgravity. In the early stages of a space flight, an astronaut experiences a puffy face, stuffy nose, and headaches due to ...
relative motion

relative motion  

The motion of one body relative to another. For a body moving in a fluid, it is the difference between the speed of the body and the speed of the fluid. When considering the influence of a fluid on ...
surface drag

surface drag  

Resistance derived from friction between the surface of a body and the fluid through which it is moving. The fluid particles adjacent to the body slow down, causing turbulent flow. The magnitude of ...
lift

lift  

A force acting on a body in a fluid in a direction perpendicular to fluid flow. Lift may assume any direction as determined by the direction of fluid flow and the orientation of the body; it is not ...
relative velocity

relative velocity  

The rate at which one system changes its position with respect to another system. When a body is moving in a fluid, in a direction opposite to the flow of the fluid, the magnitude of the body's ...
tissue fluid

tissue fluid  

The fluid, consisting of water, ions, and dissolved gases and food substances, that is formed when blood is ultrafiltered (see ultrafiltration) from the capillaries into the intercellular spaces. The ...
fluid retention

fluid retention  

Reference type:
Overview Page
The holding of fluid, mainly water, in the body. The amount of water in the human body is usually kept relatively constant by osmoregulation: if excess water is taken into the body, extra water is ...

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