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Overview

biogeochemical cycle

The cyclical movement of elements between living organisms (the biotic phase) and their nonliving (abiotic) surroundings (e.g. rocks, water, air). Examples of biogeochemical cycles are the ...

biogeochemical cycle

biogeochemical cycle   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Biology (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
48 words

...biogeochemical cycle ( nutrient cycle ) The cyclical movement of elements between living organisms (the biotic phase) and their nonliving (abiotic) surroundings (e.g. rocks, water, air). Examples of biogeochemical cycles are the carbon cycle , nitrogen cycle , oxygen cycle , phosphorus cycle , and sulphur cycle...

biogeochemical cycle

biogeochemical cycle   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Geography (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... cycle The cyclical movement of energy and materials within ecosystems . See W. Schlesinger ( 1997...

biogeochemical cycle

biogeochemical cycle   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Plant Sciences (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
164 words

... cycle The movement of chemical elements from organism to physical environment to organism in a more or less circular pathway. They are termed ‘nutrient cycles’ if the elements concerned are essential to life. The form and quantity of an element varies through the cycle, with amounts in the inorganic reservoir pools usually greater than those in the active pools. Exchange between the system components is achieved by physical processes (e.g. weathering) and/or biological processes (e.g. protein synthesis and decomposition). The latter form the vital...

biogeochemical cycle

biogeochemical cycle   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Ecology (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... cycle The movement of chemical elements from organism to physical environment to organism in more or less circular pathways. They are termed ‘nutrient cycles’ if the elements concerned are essential to life. The form and quantity of an element varies through the cycles, with amounts in the inorganic reservoir pools usually greater than those in the active pools. Exchange between the system components is achieved by physical processes (e.g. weathering) and/or biological processes (e.g. protein synthesis and decomposition). The latter form the vital...

biogeochemical cycle

biogeochemical cycle   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Geology and Earth Sciences (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

... cycle Movement of chemical elements from organism to physical environment to organism, in a more or less circular pathway. They are termed ‘nutrient cycles’ if the elements concerned are essential to life. An element may be solid, liquid, or gaseous, or form different chemical compounds, in the various parts of the cycle. Amounts in the inorganic reservoir pools are usually greater than those in the active pools . Exchange between the system components is achieved by physical processes (e.g. weathering ) and/or biological processes (e.g....

biogeochemical cycle

biogeochemical cycle   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Environment and Conservation (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

... cycle ( mineral cycle ) One of the large‐scale long‐term environmental cycles that circulates elements (such as carbon , nitrogen , oxygen , hydrogen , calcium , and sulphur ) between the biotic and abiotic components of the environment (including the atmosphere , soil , water cycle , and ecosystems ) by living organisms, geological processes, or chemical reactions. Biogeochemical cycles function at the global scale, and nutrient cycles are those biogeochemical cycles that involve the elements necessary for life. Individual...

biogeochemical cycle

biogeochemical cycle  

The cyclical movement of elements between living organisms (the biotic phase) and their nonliving (abiotic) surroundings (e.g. rocks, water, air). Examples of biogeochemical cycles are the carbon ...
Biogeochemical Cycles

Biogeochemical Cycles   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Global Change

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

... Cycles Environmental scientists recognize that the chemical elements that compose the Earth are not held in static compartments. The components of the atmosphere and oceans are transported by the fluid movements of these bodies, which determine our daily weather patterns and the major ocean currents such as the Gulf Stream. Even the solid materials of the Earth—its crust and mantle—circulate by the processes that cause mountains to rise from the sea floor and rock materials to break down, delivering dissolved constituents to the sea. For every...

Biogeochemical Cycles

Biogeochemical Cycles   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Global Change

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009

... Cycles The chemical elements that compose the Earth are not held in static compartments. The components of the atmosphere and oceans are transported by the fluid movements of these bodies, which determine our daily weather patterns and the major ocean currents such as the Gulf Stream. Even the solid materials of the Earth—its crust and mantle—circulate by the processes that cause mountains to rise from the sea floor and rock materials to break down, delivering dissolved constituents to the sea. For every chemical element of the periodic table, we...

Nutrient and Biogeochemical Cycling

Nutrient and Biogeochemical Cycling   Reference library

Deane WANG

Berkshire Encyclopedia of Sustainability

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Science and technology, Social sciences
Length:
3,943 words

... The terms nutrient cycling and biogeochemical cycling need some further discussion as they are both used in the title of this section. As used here, the distinctions in the terms lie in how they may be applied to nutrients versus contaminants. Biogeochemical cycling is the broader of the terms as it applies to any element moving through the biosphere and lithosphere, whether it is a nutrient of life or not. Thus the biogeochemical cycling of a contaminant like mercury (Hg) is not appropriately considered nutrient cycling as there is currently no...

mineral cycle

mineral cycle  

A biogeochemical cycle, in which elements move through the soil, living organisms, air, and water, or through some of these.
carbon pool

carbon pool  

The total amount of carbon that is stored, cycling, or otherwise available for use in biogeochemical cycles.
rock cycle

rock cycle  

The never‐ending series of natural geological processes that continuously refashions, redistributes, and recycles material from and on the Earth's crust, including weathering, erosion, sediment ...
geochemical cycle

geochemical cycle  

A continuous cycle of elements passing through and between the Earth's lithosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere. For example, sodium is released from rocks (lithosphere) by weathering and ...
man-induced turnover

man-induced turnover  

The additional flow of an element through the active part of a biogeochemical cycle that results from human activity. For example, by burning fossil fuels humans add an extra 6.7 billion tonnes per ...
sequester

sequester  

In the strict sense, to bind a metal ion into a chelate; more broadly, to take up and fix. The word is also used in describing processes within biogeochemical cycles, as when forests or oceans ...
natural turnover rate

natural turnover rate  

The normal rate of transfer of an element through the active part of a biogeochemical cycle. Compare man-induced turnover. See also turnover.
nutrient cycle

nutrient cycle  

The natural circulation of chemical elements (such as carbon and nitrogen) and compounds through specific pathways from the abiotic parts of ecosystems into the organic substances of the biotic ...
global environmental research

global environmental research  

Research into environmental issues at the global scale, which reflects growing interest in two sets of processes. First, there are the natural environmental processes that are global in scale. This ...
active pool

active pool  

That part of a biogeochemical cycle in which the nutrient element under consideration is exchanged rapidly between the biotic and abiotic components. Usually the active pool is smaller than the ...

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