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benefice

Subject: Religion

A term originally used for a grant of land for life as a reward for services, in canon law it came to imply an ecclesiastical office which prescribed certain duties or conditions for the ...

beneficence

beneficence   Reference library

Garner's Modern English Usage (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
128 words

... ; benefaction ; beneficiation . Although beneficence most generally denotes the quality or state of doing or producing good, it most commonly denotes either a predisposition to perform acts of kindness or a particular act of kindness (such as a donation). In these latter senses, beneficence overlaps considerably with the less-common benefaction . The tendency to consider benefaction more concrete and particular is evident in the much greater frequency in use of the plural benefactions than of beneficences . Hence there might be...

beneficence

beneficence n.   Quick reference

Concise Medical Dictionary (10 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Medicine and health, Clinical Medicine
Length:
90 words

... n. doing good: one of the four principles of medical ethics. The obligation to act in patients’ best interests at all times is recognized in ancient and modern codes of professional conduct, e.g. the Hippocratic oath . Benefits in health care, and therefore beneficence, must commonly be balanced against risks or harms (i.e. nonmaleficence ). The courts have been clear that beneficence extends beyond medical interests. Respect for autonomy requires that professionals determine what the patient considers to be doing good in any given...

beneficence

beneficence ((in ethics))   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Nursing (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2021
Subject:
Medicine and health
Length:
32 words

... [bi- nef -i-sĕns] n. ( in ethics ) doing good: the obligation to act in the patient’s best interests at all times, which should be what the patient considers to be doing...

Beneficence

Beneficence   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Epidemiology (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

...Beneficence Literally, doing good. In bioethics, a principle underlying utilitarian approaches. It implies a certain obligation to promote benefits of things judged to be good, typically balancing potential or produced goods against risks. In public health , it implies acting in the best interest of the population at stake. 13 , 117 , 118 ...

beneficence

beneficence   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Public Health (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...beneficence The ethical principle of doing good. This means doing good because it is the morally correct course of action, not doing good as a charitable act. It is one of the primary motives for public health action, whether the action is carried out for the public good, the benefit of others, or from enlightened self-interest, which may motivate actions intended to eliminate or control a danger to health, such as a nidus of infection or a hazardous workplace. Literally, doing good. In public health , it implies acting in the best interest of the population...

beneficence

beneficence   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

...beneficence The ethical principle that is about doing good for the client or patient. See also autonomy , ethics , justice , non-maleficence...

beneficence

beneficence   Quick reference

New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
587 words

... • abeyance , conveyance, purveyance • creance • ambience • irradiance , radiance • expedience , obedience • audience • dalliance , mésalliance • salience • consilience , resilience • emollience • ebullience • convenience , lenience, provenience • impercipience , incipience, percipience • variance • experience • luxuriance , prurience • nescience • omniscience • insouciance • deviance • subservience • transience • alliance , appliance, compliance, defiance, misalliance, neuroscience, reliance, science • allowance • ...

beneficence

beneficence  

(bi-nef-i-sĕns)(in health care) the duty to do good and avoid doing harm to other people, which includes acting to promote their interests and protecting the weak and vulnerable. It includes the duty ...
benefice

benefice   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Local and Family History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
4 words

... . An ecclesiastical...

benefice

benefice   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
4 words

... An ecclesiastical...

Benefice

Benefice   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

... Under the Romans certain grants of land made to veteran soldiers were called beneficia , and in early feudal times an estate held for life, in return for military service, was called a benefice. The term came to be applied to the possessions of the church held by individuals as a recompense for their services. Hence a church...

benefice

benefice   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
81 words

... . A term originally used for a grant of land for life as a reward for services, in canon law it came to imply an ecclesiastical office which prescribed certain duties or conditions for the due discharge of which it provided certain revenues. Individual holders of parochial benefices in the C of E are known as either rectors or vicars , while in a team ministry the benefice is usually vested in the team rector. See also Advowson...

benefice

benefice   Reference library

Gordon Campbell

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
189 words

... The Latin term beneficium was used in feudal societies to denote a grant of land for life as a reward for services. It entered English when under canon law ( see canons, holy ) it came to imply an ecclesiastical office which prescribed certain duties or conditions (‘spiritualities’) for the due discharge of which it awarded certain revenues (‘temporalities’). Parochial benefices in the C of E are of three kinds: rectories, vicarages, and (until 1968) perpetual curacies. The conferring of benefices is now governed by the Mission and Pastoral Measure...

Benefices, Ecclesiastical

Benefices, Ecclesiastical   Reference library

Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
494 words

...was inseparable from the benefice. Benefices were divided into secular and regular benefices, the former being those that could be possessed by clerics , the latter only by religious. Secular benefices comprised the papacy, bishoprics dignities of chapters , cure-priorships, perpetual vicariates, simple cures, chapels and chaplaincies ; regular benefices were abbacies and claustral offices having revenues assigned to them (conventual Prior , chamberlain , almoner, hospitaller, sacristan, cellarer , etc.). These benefices were simple or double and...

Reservation of benefices

Reservation of benefices   Reference library

Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
170 words

...of benefices The papacy began to involve itself in the 12th c. in the allocation of ecclesiastical Benefices . In 1265 , Clement IV laid down the principle that the Roman pontiff had the entire disposal of them, but limited its application to Benefices whose titulars died at the seat of the Roman Curia . The right of reservation was gradually extended, notably by John XXII ( 1316 ) and Gregory XI to all bishoprics and men's monasteries that became vacant during his reign. Alongside these general reservations, particular reservations were...

Pluralism of Benefices

Pluralism of Benefices   Reference library

Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
178 words

...of Benefices Pluralism, with the non- residence it often entailed, was one of the failings for which the clergy were reproached by all reformers of the medieval Church. But the phenomenon never ceased to grow, thanks to a less and less demanding legislation, which made dispensations still more flexible. Limited until the 15th c. to Benefices without cure of souls and reaching important proportions, more than two or three benefices at the same time, only for the small elite that had access to apostolic Provisions , in the second half of that...

patron of a benefice

patron of a benefice   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
66 words

...of a benefice The person or collective, such as a religious community, possessing the *advowson or the right to nominate a cleric to the benefice. Patrons who left benefices vacant for more than six months lost their right of nomination. William J. Dohar J. Bettey , Church and Community (1979). E. Mason , ‘ The Role of the English Parishioner, 1100–1500 ’, JEH 26 (1976),...

benefice

benefice n   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Original Shakespearean Pronunciation

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

...benefice n = sp benefice 1 ...

benefice

benefice   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
45 words

... †favour, benefit; ecclesiastical living. XIV. — OF. benefice (mod. bénéfice profit, perquisite) — L. beneficium , f. bene well + fic- var. of stem of facere DO 1 , make . So beneficence XVI, beneficent XVII. — F. — L. beneficial XV. — F. or late L. beneficiary XVII. — L. (cf. F. bénéficiaire...

benefice

benefice   Quick reference

New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
108 words

... • abyss , amiss, bis, bliss, Chris, Diss, hiss, kiss, Majlis, miss, piss, reminisce, sis, Swiss, this, vis • dais • Powys , prowess • loess , Lois • Lewes , lewis • abbess • ibis • Anubis , pubis • cannabis • arabis • duchess • purchase • caddis , Gladys • Candice • Sardis , Tardis • vendace • Charybdis • bodice , goddess • demigoddess • Aldiss • jaundice • de profundis • prejudice • hendiadys • cowardice • stewardess • preface • Memphis • aphis • edifice • benefice • orifice • artifice • office • surface , surface-to-surface...

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