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bendith y mamau

Subject: Religion

[W., mothers' blessings]. A Glamorganshire euphemism for the fairies, known more often in Wales as tylwyth teg. Euphemism is preferred to avoid kidnapping or fairy mischief. Cf. ...

bendith y mamau

bendith y mamau   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

... y mamau [W., mothers' blessings]. A Glamorganshire euphemism for the fairies , known more often in Wales as tylwyth teg . Euphemism is preferred to avoid kidnapping or fairy mischief. Cf. cwn bendith y mamau [W, dogs of the bendith y mamau] under CŴN ANNWFN...

bendith y mamau

bendith y mamau  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
[W., mothers' blessings].A Glamorganshire euphemism for the fairies, known more often in Wales as tylwyth teg. Euphemism is preferred to avoid kidnapping or fairy mischief. Cf. cwn bendith y mamau ...
cŵn annwfn

cŵn annwfn  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
[W, dogs of annwfn, the Otherworld].Otherworldly dogs or hell-hounds of Welsh tradition. Usually seen as a pack of small, red-grey or, alternatively, snow-white, red-eared spectral hounds. Near at ...
y tylwyth teg

y tylwyth teg  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
[W, the fair folk].The most usual Welsh name for fairies. They are often known by the euphemism bendith y mamau [W, mother's blessings] to avert kidnapping, especially in Glamorgan. Although most ...
cŵn annwfn

cŵn annwfn   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...hunt the souls of the living through the air; they seek to kidnap mortals and to lead the souls of the damned to infernal regions. Hunters who ride with them include Arthur and the black-faced Gwyn ap Nudd . The dogs may be known by many other names; in Welsh they are cŵn bendith y mamau [fairy dogs]; cŵn cyrff [corpse dogs]; cŵn wybr [sky dogs]; cŵn toili [toili dogs]. In English they may be known as Gabriel hounds, ratchets, or hell hounds. See also ARKAN SONNEY ; CÙ SÌTH ; DOG ; FAIRY DOG . Motif E501....

tylwyth teg, y

tylwyth teg, y   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...teg, y [W, the fair folk]. The most usual Welsh name for fairies . They are often known by the euphemism bendith y mamau [W, mother's blessings] to avert kidnapping, especially in Glamorgan. Although most stories about y tylwyth teg are recorded from oral tradition, references to them appear in writing as early as Giraldus Cambrensis ( c. 1146–1223 ). They are described as fair-haired and as loving golden hair, and thus they covet mortal children with blond or fair hair. Their usual king is Gwyn ap Nudd . In general y tylwyth teg are portrayed as...

fairy

fairy   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...bunadh na croc/bunadh na gcnoc [host/stock of the hills], bunadh beag na farraige [wee folk of the sea]; ScG daoine s'th [people of the mound]; Manx ny guillyn beggey [the little boys], ny mooinjer veggey [the little kindred], ny sleih veggey [the little people]; W bendith y mamau [W, mother's blessings] ; Corn. an bobel vyghan [the little people]. Celtic conceptions of fairies, which approach an orthodoxy, depict diminutive or pygmy persons. Fairies are often invisible or can become so at will, often by donning a magical cap. They prefer to live...

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