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bean nighe

Subject: Religion

[ScG, washerwoman, laundrymaid]. A female wraith of Scottish Gaelic folklore who washes bloodstained clothes when some person in the neighbourhood is about to die, usually in ...

bean nighe

bean nighe   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

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Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

... nighe , nigheadaireachd [ScG, washerwoman, laundrymaid]. A female wraith of Scottish Gaelic folklore who washes bloodstained clothes when some person in the neighbourhood is about to die, usually in battle; a Scottish instance of the pan-Celtic washer at the ford . The bean nighe is usually thought to be small and slender, often wearing green, sometimes with red webbed feet. She haunts desolate lakes and streams, and although she portends evil a person does better to see her before the bean nighe sees the mortal. Anyone rash enough to seize one of her...

bean nighe

bean nighe  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
[ScG, washerwoman, laundrymaid].A female wraith of Scottish Gaelic folklore who washes bloodstained clothes when some person in the neighbourhood is about to die, usually in battle; a Scottish ...
cadineag

cadineag  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
Scottish Gaelic fairy or weeper, similar to the bean nighe. It may be heard wailing in the darkness near a waterfall before catastrophe overtakes a clan; sometimes portrayed in stories of the ...
washer at the ford

washer at the ford  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
English name for a familiar figure in Irish, Scottish Gaelic, Welsh, and perhaps Breton oral tradition, who may appear locally under different names. A death omen, she is sometimes beautiful and ...
cadineag

cadineag   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

.... Scottish Gaelic fairy or weeper, similar to the bean nighe . It may be heard wailing in the darkness near a waterfall before catastrophe overtakes a clan; sometimes portrayed in stories of the massacre at Glencoe , north Strathclyde, formerly Argyllshire ( 1692 ). Perhaps identical with the caoineag , caointeach , and caointeag...

caointeach

caointeach   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

..., canejach [ScG, mourner, whiner]. A version of the banshee who may also include elements of the bean nighe as localized in the southern Highlands, especially what used to be Argyllshire (since 1974 , north Strathclyde). She has been described as a child or a very little woman in a short green petticoat with a high-crowned white cap. She may also wear a green shawl. A solitary fairy , perhaps identical with the caoineag and cadineag ; see CAOINTEAG . A Welsh counterpart is the cyhyraeth...

washer at the ford

washer at the ford   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...river and turns to tell the beholder that they are his or hers. The persona of the washer may be derived from the Mórrígan , although Badb can take on this role. In Irish oral tradition the washer is nearly synonymous with the banshee , in Scottish Gaelic tradition is the bean nighe , in Welsh Modron , in Breton tunnerez noz . Fiona Macleod [William Sharp] christianizes the figure as that of Mary Magdalene standing in the middle of a stream washing the souls who crave eternity in his The Washer of the Ford (Edinburgh, 1896...

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