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bacteriophage

(phage) n. a virus that attacks bacteria. In general, a phage consists of a head, tail, and tail fibres, all composed of protein molecules, and a core of DNA. The tail and tail fibres are ...

bacteriophage

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A Dictionary of Plant Sciences (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
61 words

... ( phage ) A type of virus which infects bacteria . Infection with a bacteriophage may or may not lead to the death of the bacterium, depending on the phage and sometimes on conditions. A given bacteriophage usually infects only a single species or strain of bacterium. Phages can be found in most natural environments in which bacteria...

bacteriophage

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World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
33 words

... Virus that lives on and infects bacteria . It has a protein head containing a core of DNA and a protein tail. Discovered in 1915 , it is important in the study of genetics...

bacteriophage

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A Dictionary of Dentistry (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Medicine and health, Dentistry
Length:
65 words

... n. A virus (often referred to as a phage) that infects bacterial cells and either causes lysis of the bacteria or forms a bacterial lysogen in which the virus genome inserts into the bacterial deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and becomes dormant. Some bacteriophages carry genes for particular toxins that are produced by their bacterial hosts following lysogen formation (e.g. diphtheria toxin and scarlet fever...

bacteriophage

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Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
213 words

...as the T‐even phages , are 200–250 nm long, while filamentous phages measure roughly 800 nm × 5 nm. In general, a given bacteriophage can infect only one particular species, or strain, or group of closely related strains, though a given strain may be susceptible to infection by a number of different phages. Bacteriophages can bring about transduction (def. 1) between bacterial cells. Compare cyanophage . See (bacterio)phage conversion , lysogeny , phage induction , phage typing , prophage , temperate phage , virulent phage...

bacteriophage

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A Dictionary of Nursing (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Medicine and health
Length:
61 words

...bacteriophage ( phage ) [bak- teer -i-oh-fayj] n. a virus that attacks bacteria. The phage grows and replicates in the bacterial cell, which is eventually destroyed with the release of new phages. Each phage acts specifically against a particular species of bacterium. This is utilized in phage typing , a technique of identifying bacteria by the action of known phages on them....

bacteriophage

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A Dictionary of Genetics (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
155 words

...1934, Schlesinger; 1939, Ellis and Delbrück; 1942, Luria and Anderson; 1945, Luria; 1949, Hershey and Rotman; 1952, Hershey and Chase; 1953, Visconti and Delbrück; 1966, Edgar and Wood; 1970, Alberts and Frey; 1973, Fiers et al .; Appendix F , bacteriophages; filamentous phage, lambda ( λ ) bacteriophage, MS2, phi X174, plaque, P1 phage, P22 phage, Q beta phage, temperate phage, T phages, transduction, virulent...

bacteriophage

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Concise Medical Dictionary (10 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Medicine and health, Clinical Medicine
Length:
107 words

... ( phage ) n. a virus that attacks bacteria. In general, a phage consists of a head, tail, and tail fibres, all composed of protein molecules, and a core of DNA. The tail and tail fibres are responsible for attachment to the bacterial surface and for injection of the DNA core into the host cell. The phage grows and replicates in the bacterial cell, which is eventually destroyed with the release of new phages. Each phage acts specifically against a particular species of bacterium. This is utilized in phage typing , a technique of identifying...

bacteriophage

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A Dictionary of Biology (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
220 words

...bacteriophage ( phage ) A virus that is parasitic within a bacterium. Each phage is specific for only one type of bacterium. Most phages ( virulent phages ) infect, quickly multiply within, and destroy (lyse) their host cells. However, some ( temperate phages ) remain dormant in their hosts after initial infection: their nucleic acid becomes integrated into that of the host and multiplies with it, producing infected daughter cells ( see lysogeny ). Lysis may eventually be triggered by environmental factors. Phages are used experimentally to identify...

bacteriophage

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A Dictionary of Environment and Conservation (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

... ( phage ) Any member of a group of viruses whose hosts are bacteria...

bacteriophage

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A Dictionary of Ecology (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... ( phage ) A type of virus which infects bacteria. Infection with a bacteriophage may or may not lead to the death of the bacterium, depending on the phage and sometimes on conditions. A given bacteriophage usually infects only a single species or strain of bacterium. Phages can be found in most natural environments in which bacteria...

bacteriophage

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A Dictionary of Public Health (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...bacteriophage ( phage ) A family of viruses that destroy (“eat”) bacteria, including many pathogenic species. Before the discovery of antibiotics, development of bacteriophage as a therapeutic weapon was a research priority, but although some of this was promising, the main use for bacteriophage since antibiotics became available has been in research on the molecular biology of genes. The rising frequency of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has led to some resurgence of interest in bacteriophage, but practical applications are elusive. ...

bacteriophage

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A Dictionary of Food and Nutrition (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

... Viruses that attack bacteria , commonly known as phages. They pass through bacterial filters , and can be a cause of considerable problems in bacterial cultures (for example milk starter ...

bacteriophage packaging

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A Dictionary of Genetics (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
19 words

... packaging insertion of recombinant bacteriophage lambda DNA into E. coli for replication and encapsidation into plaque-forming bacteriophage...

vegetative bacteriophage

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Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
28 words

...bacteriophage the intrabacterial genome of a bacteriophage when it is noninfective but controlling the synthesis by the host of components needed to make new infective bacteriophage...

lambda bacteriophage

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A Dictionary of Biomedicine (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019

...lambda bacteriophage ( λ ‎ phage ) A DNA virus first isolated from E. coli , structurally similar to T even phages . It shows a lytic cycle and a lysogenic cycle, and is extensively used as a cloning vector, capable of carrying DNA fragments up to 15 kb long. The cosmid vector, which will transfer larger sequences, was constructed from its ends....

f1 bacteriophage

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Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
15 words

...bacteriophage a filamentous single‐stranded DNA virus that infects only male strains of Escherichia coli...

(bacterio)phage conversion

(bacterio)phage conversion   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
44 words

...bacterio)phage conversion or prophage‐mediated conversion or lysogenic conversion the introduction of new properties to a host bacterium by the genome of an infecting lysogenic prophage. Such properties may include resistance to lysis by related phages, changes in antigenic constitution, or the appearance of...

lambda (λ) bacteriophage

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A Dictionary of Genetics (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
134 words

...( λ ) bacteriophage a double-stranded DNA virus that infects E. coli. The head of the virus contains a linear DNA molecule 48,514 bp long. However, upon entering the bacterium, the two ends of the DNA molecule become covalently joined to form a circle. Once inside the host cell, the virus can enter either a lytic developmental cycle or a lysogenic cycle. Specific repressors control the switch for either cycle. If the lysogenic cycle is chosen, the virus is eventually integrated into the E. coli chromosome at a specific site. See Appendix C , 1950,...

bacteriophage

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The New Oxford Dictionary for Scientific Writers and Editors (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009

... Often shortened to phage . A virus that infects a bacterium. For the classification of phages, see virus . There is no standardized system for naming individual phages (i.e. species and isolates). Existing names employ various combinations of Roman or Greek letters, Arabic or Roman numerals, and superscript or subscript characters. Many names are prefixed with a capital P or a lower-case phi, e.g. PM2, ϕ6, ϕX, Pf1, etc. In an attempt to rationalize the nomenclature, H.-W. Ackermann proposed that ‘new’ phages be designated according to their...

bacteriophage

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New Oxford American Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
44 words

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