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attainder

Subject: Law

The extinction of civil rights and powers when judgement of death or outlawry was recorded against a person convicted of treason or felony. It was the severest English common law penalty, ...

attainder

attainder   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Local and Family History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
89 words

... . A person condemned to death or outlawry for treason or felony forfeited both his real and personal estate and, by ‘corruption of blood’, his right to inherit or transmit property. Attainder was ordered either by judicial judgement or, from 1539 , by an Act of Parliament (an Act of Attainder). For most crimes attainder was ended by the Forfeiture Act of 1870 , but for outlawry it lasted until 1938 . Inventories of the goods and chattels of attainted persons are found in the Public Record Office , mainly under E...

attainder

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The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
87 words

... A person condemned to death or outlawry for treason or felony forfeited both his real and personal estate and, by ‘corruption of blood’, his right to inherit or transmit property. Attainder was ordered either by judicial judgment or, from 1539 , by an Act of Parliament (an Act of Attainder). For most crimes attainder was ended by the Forfeiture Act 1870 , but for outlawry it lasted until 1938 . Inventories of the goods and chattels of attainted persons are found in The National Archives , mainly in E...

attainder

attainder   Quick reference

A Dictionary of World History (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History
Length:
120 words

... The extinction of civil rights and powers when judgement of death or outlawry was recorded against a person convicted of treason or felony. It was the severest English common law penalty, for an attainted person lost all his goods and lands to the crown. Procedure by Act of Attainder became common in the Wars of the Roses , when because it was reversible it could be used as a powerful threat. Of the 397 people condemned by process in Parliament between 1453 and 1509 , over 250 ultimately had their attainders reversed. Acts of Attainder came to be...

attainder

attainder   Reference library

Australian Law Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Law
Length:
309 words

...attainder ( obs ) Outlawry. At common law , attainder arose immediately and inseparably from a death sentence for murder or treason . The felon was civiliter mortuus (dead to the civil law), being judged no longer fit to live ( cf right to life); he or she was attaint (stained, stigmatised) and unable, under evidence Acts, to be called as a witness before any court (a form of outlawry). The attainted felon forfeited property or lost the right to inherit or transmit land. Long abolished in all jurisdictions in its original form ( but see ...

attainder, bill of

attainder, bill of   Reference library

The Oxford Guide to the United States Government

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics
Length:
130 words

..., bill of A bill of attainder is a law that punishes a person without permitting him a trial or fair hearing in a court of law. It is punishment by legislation. Article 1, Section 9, of the U.S. Constitution forbids Congress to pass a bill of attainder, and Article 1, Section 10, prohibits any state government from enacting one. If the Constitution permitted bills of attainder, government officials could, by law, force the person attained or punished by legislative act to forfeit his liberty, property, or income. Using a bill of attainder, government...

attainder, Acts of

attainder, Acts of   Quick reference

A Dictionary of British History (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
132 words

..., Acts of These were unpleasant political weapons whereby the accused was denied a proper trial and the normal laws of evidence could be set aside. In form they were bills of Parliament, passed by both Houses and receiving the royal assent: life, property, and titles were all forfeit. Parliamentary indictment was used against the Despensers , favourites of Edward II , and during the Wars of the Roses , Lancastrians and Yorkists in turn used attainders against their opponents. Thomas Cromwell was attainted in 1540 without being heard in his own...

bill of attainder

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A Concise Oxford Dictionary of Politics and International Relations (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics
Length:
77 words

...of attainder A law that indicates the guilt of an individual without trial. In effect, this transfers the functions of ascertaining guilt and sentencing from the judiciary to the legislature. Under Article One, sections nine and ten of the US Constitution, ‘No Bill of Attainder shall be passed by either Congress or State legislature’. Acts of Attainder were employed by the British Parliament between the fifteenth and early eighteenth century, but have not been used...

attainder, Acts of

attainder, Acts of   Reference library

J. A. Cannon

The Oxford Companion to British History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
213 words

...The attainder of Strafford , after his impeachment had broken down, was a crucial episode in the power struggle before the Civil War and Charles I’s assent was both imprudent and shabby. In 1689 the Jacobite Parliament at Dublin used attainder wholesale against the supporters of William III. One of the last attainders in England was against Sir John Fenwick for plotting to assassinate William III, but there was uneasiness at the method of proceeding. Ormond and Bolingbroke were deprived by Acts of attainder in 1715 after they had fled rather...

Attainder, Bills Of

Attainder, Bills Of   Reference library

Edgar Bodenheimer

The Oxford Companion to the Supreme Court of the United States (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Law
Length:
705 words

..., Bills Of During the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries the British Parliament often employed enactments called bills of attainder to inflict the death penalty on persons deemed guilty of seditious acts, such as attempting to overthrow the government. In addition to the death sentence, a bill of attainder usually carried with it a “corruption of blood,” which meant that the attainted party's property could not pass to his heirs. If the bill imposed a punishment short of death, such as banishment, confiscation of goods, or loss of the right to vote, it...

attainder

attainder n   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Original Shakespearean Pronunciation

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

...attainder n ǝ'tɛ:ndǝɹ sp attainder 2 , attaindor 1 ...

attainder

attainder   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
21 words

... consequences of sentence of death or outlawry. XV. -AN . attainder , atteinder , sb. use of infin., OF. ataindre ATTAIN ; see -ER 5...

attainder

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New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
153 words

... • bedder , cheddar, Edda, Enzedder, header, Kedah, shedder, shredder, spreader, tedder, threader, treader, Vedda • elder , Griselda, welder, Zelda • addenda , agenda, amender, ascender, attender, bender, blender, Brenda, contender, corrigenda, descender, engender, extender, fazenda, fender, gender, Glenda, Gwenda, hacienda, Länder, lender, mender, offender, pudenda, recommender, referenda, render, sender, slender, spender, splendour ( US splendor), surrender, suspender, tender, Venda, weekender, Wenda • parascender • bartender • homesteader •...

attainder

attainder noun   Quick reference

Oxford Dictionary of English (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
143 words
attainder

attainder noun   Quick reference

New Oxford American Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
127 words
attainder

attainder noun   Reference library

The Canadian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
52 words
attainder

attainder noun   Reference library

The New Zealand Oxford Dictionary

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
58 words
attainder

attainder noun   Reference library

Australian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
58 words
attainder

attainder  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
The extinction of civil rights and powers when judgement of death or outlawry was recorded against a person convicted of treason or felony. It was the severest English common law penalty, for an ...
bill of attainder

bill of attainder noun   Quick reference

New Oxford American Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
14 words
bill of attainder

bill of attainder  

Reference type:
Overview Page
A law that indicates the guilt of an individual without trial. In effect, this transfers the functions of ascertaining guilt and sentencing from the judiciary to the legislature. Under Article One, ...

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