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astynomoi

(‘city magistrates’), an office found mostly in the Ionian states (see Ionians). In Athens there were five for the city and five for the Piraeus, appointed by lot for one ...

astynomoi (‘city magistrates’)

astynomoi (‘city magistrates’)   Reference library

Arnold Wycombe Gomme and P. J. Rhodes

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
109 words

... (‘city magistrates’) , an office found mostly in the Ionian states ( see ionians ). In Athens there were five for the city and five for the Piraeus , appointed by lot for one year. Their principal duties were to keep the streets and sanctuaries clean and free from obstructions, and they enforced certain sumptuary laws ( Ath. pol. 50. 2). In many states they also had harbour and market duties. An inscription of the 2nd cent. ad gives a law governing the duties of the astynomoi at Pergamum , enacted in the 2nd cent. bc ( SEG 13. 521). Arnold...

astynomoi

astynomoi  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(‘city magistrates’), an office found mostly in the Ionian states (see Ionians). In Athens there were five for the city and five for the Piraeus, appointed by lot for one ...
police

police   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Classical Literature (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Classical studies
Length:
181 words

...law did not exist. At Athens there were minor officials, astynomoi , whose responsibility it was to keep streets clean and supervise the markets, etc. There was also a corps of 300 Scythian archers who kept order in the assembly and law-courts, but there was no body with powers to investigate, arrest, or prosecute. These activities were left to private citizens who with neighbours and kin practised a kind of self-help. At Rome the aediles had functions similar to those of the Athenian astynomoi . There were also officials who supervised the city gaols and...

Pergamum

Pergamum   Reference library

Antony J. S. Spawforth and Charlotte Roueché

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
639 words

...focus the royal palace—a remarkable statement of royal absolutism ( see urbanism ); an inscription ( SEG 13. 521; Eng. trans. in M. M. Austin no. 216) preserves a royal law on municipal administration showing the efforts made to keep the city clean and in good repair ( see astynomoi ). This royal programme aimed at transforming Pergamum into a Hellenistic cultural capital, for which the model was Athens , recipient of generous Attalid patronage in the 2nd cent. bc . Declared free in his will by Attalus III , Pergamum lost its Roman status of allied city...

police

police   Reference library

Tim J. Cornell

The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
855 words

...of social control have been centralized and monopolized by the state. On the other hand, ancient city-states recognized the need for publicly appointed officials to carry out functions of social regulation. For example, in Classical Athens annual boards of magistrates ( astynomoi (streets), agoranomoi (markets), sitophylakes (corn supply), etc.) were charged with keeping the streets clean, supervising market transactions, and controlling grain prices ( Ath. Pol. 50–1, with Rhodes CAAP ). Officials of this kind are attested in Greek cities...

police

police   Reference library

Tim J. Cornell

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
1,005 words

...of social control have been centralized and monopolized by the state. On the other hand, ancient city-states recognized the need for publicly appointed officials to carry out functions of social regulation. For example, in Classical Athens annual boards of magistrates ( astynomoi , agoranomoi , sitophylakes , etc.) were charged with keeping the streets clean, supervising market transactions, and controlling grain prices ( Ath. Pol. 50–1, with Rhodes CAAP ). Officials of this kind are attested in Greek cities throughout the Hellenistic and Roman...

Prostitution in Ancient Greek Law

Prostitution in Ancient Greek Law   Reference library

The Oxford International Encyclopedia of Legal History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law, History
Length:
1,994 words

...prostitutes as well. A further rule, intended to prevent fights, stated that in case of quarrel among two or more men concerning the “lease” of the same woman, the polis would decide which was the person to be preferred. The officials in charge of this decision were the astynomoi (Arist., Ath. Pol . 50, 2). Male prostitution ( hetairesis ) was socially perceived and legally regulated in a very different way. This difference is tied to the importance and the role of paiderastia (pederasty), the relationship between an adult citizen, called erastēs ...

Commercial Law

Commercial Law   Reference library

The Oxford International Encyclopedia of Legal History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law, History
Length:
9,196 words
Illustration(s):
2

...enforced a law against defaming those working in the agora. In the fifth century they regulated the weight of loaves of bread offered for sale, but this duty was transferred to the sitophylakes in the fourth century (see below). There was also a board of officials called the astynomoi (city controllers), who helped to maintain order and enforced regulations for the city of Athens ( Constitution of the Athenians 50.2). One of their duties was to supervise the hiring of women who played the flute, harp, or lyre and to limit their fees to no more than 2...

Property

Property   Reference library

The Oxford International Encyclopedia of Legal History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law, History
Length:
35,301 words
Illustration(s):
3

...are permitted to build drains through their neighbor's land provided they are covered and do not exceed half a meter in width. Those who own cisterns must make them watertight and not allow them to become clogged. All cisterns must be registered with officials called the astynomoi , who have the power to levy fines, to be paid to injured parties, for any damage they cause. Certain Greek communities placed other restrictions on the rights of owners. In Gortyn gifts of property made by a debtor, a defendant in a trial, or someone sentenced to pay a fine...

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