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ash

1 The mineral content of a product that remains after complete combustion, which consists mainly of minerals in oxidized form. See also fly ash. 2 ...

ash

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A Dictionary of Geology and Earth Sciences (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

... Tephra less than 2 mm in...

ash

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A Dictionary of Chemical Engineering

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

...ash The non-volatile products and residues that remain after a combustion process. Electrostatic precipitators are used to remove ash particles from flue gas streams. ...

ash

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World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
90 words

... Group of mainly deciduous trees of the genus Fraxinus growing in temperate regions, usually having leaves made up of many small leaflets, and winged fruits. The wood is elastic, strong and shock-resistant, and is widely used for furniture. Species include manna ash, F. ornus , the flowering ash of s Europe and Asia Minor; the European ash, F. excelsior , which grows to 45m (148ft) tall; and F. floribunda , a native of the Himalayas. Family Oleaceae. The mountain ash of Europe and Asia ( Sorbus aucuparia ) comes from a different...

Ash

Ash   Reference library

Concise Oxford Dictionary of Family Names in Britain

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2021
Subject:
Names studies
Length:
66 words

... 1881: 4918; widespread in England: especially London; Devon; Staffs. English: locative name from one or more of the many places called Ash (Derbys, Devon, Dorset, Herefs, Kent, Shrops, Somerset, Surrey), or Ashe (Devon and Hants), or topographic for someone who lived by an ash-tree. All are from Middle English ash , aish , esh ‘ash-tree’ (Old English æsc ). See also Nash , Rash , Tash , and compare Aske...

ash

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A Dictionary of Food and Nutrition (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

... The residue left behind after all organic matter has been burnt off, a measure of the total content of mineral salts in a...

‘ash’

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The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Linguistics (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Linguistics
Length:
21 words

...ash’ The digraph ‘æ’, devised originally in the spelling of Old English, for a vowel that was phonetically [a] or...

ash

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A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

... [OE aesc ]. A tree regarded with awe in Celtic countries, especially Ireland. The ash may be any of the various trees of the genus Fraxinus , which usually grow quite tall and have close-grained wood; the mountain ash, rowan , or quicken tree, a smaller tree of the genus Sorbus aucuparia , is usually considered separately in the Celtic imagination. There are several recorded instances in Irish history in which people refused to cut an ash, even when wood was scarce, for fear of having their own cabins consumed with flame. The ash tree itself might be used...

Ash

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The Oxford Companion to the English Language (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...Ash ( æsc , aesc ) . The scholarly name for the ligature (upper case Æ , lower case æ or æ ) of a and e , used in old english orthography for a sound related to but distinct from the sound represented by each letter separately. The form æ is used in IPA for a not quite open, front unrounded vowel, higher than Cardinal 4 and lower than Cardinal 3, as in many pronunciations of cat /kæt/. Ash is also the name of the Old English rune symbol, (ᚨ), meaning ‘ash’ or ‘ash tree’, which represents both the word ‘ash’ and the sound /æ/ ( see ...

Ash

Ash   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Religion
Length:
114 words

... or ashes . . In Western religions, ashes generally represent human frailty and mortality. Thus in Christianity, ashes are smeared on the forehead during the Ash Wednesday ritual. The words of committal in the Anglican Book of Common Prayer are, ‘We commit this body to the ground, earth to earth, ashes to ashes, dust to dust.’ But in Indian religions, and especially among Hindus, ash represents the pure substance left when the impure accidents of life have been removed. Ash is therefore smeared on the body as a mark of commitment to the process of...

ash

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A Dictionary of Environment and Conservation (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

... 1. The mineral content of a product that remains after complete combustion, which consists mainly of minerals in oxidized form. See also fly ash . 2. Volcanic dust that erupts from a volcano , and either flows out (as a pyroclastic flow ) or forms a...

ash

ash   Reference library

Sister Noella Marcellino and David R. Benson

The Oxford Companion to Cheese

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Society and culture, Cookery, Food, and Drink
Length:
450 words
Illustration(s):
1

...with ash, which is often mixed with salt, to help protect and develop their rinds. See loire valley . The practice of coating goat cheese with ash has also been adopted by several artisanal cheesemakers in the United States. Some varieties have a striking black line in the curd that comes from ash layered in during the molding process. The ash itself may be derived from various sources, from grapevine clippings to wood, with the more recent adoption of activated charcoal. Dye is also used by some cheesemakers to give a similar appearance. Ash is assumed...

ash

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Mike Allaby

Dictionary Plus Science and Technology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Science and technology
Length:
84 words

... 1. The powdery solid residue from combustion of coal, peat, wood, etc. 2. ( volcanic ash ) Mineral particles smaller than 2 mm that are ejected in large quantities by explosive volcanic eruptions. Such eruptions occur when volatile compounds expand violently as they approach the surface, ejecting magmatic rock as foam that condenses as it cools. 3. One of 63 species (genus Fraxinus ) of trees that occur throughout temperate regions of the northern hemisphere. Many are grown for their timber or for ornament. Mike...

Ash

Ash   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...in 1711 , had attempted to murder Robert Harley . Ash tree or Tree of the Universe See yggdrasil . Ash Wednesday The first day of lent , so called from the Roman Catholic custom of sprinkling on the heads of penitents the consecrated ashes of palms remaining from the previous palm sunday . The custom is of uncertain date but is commonly held to have been introduced during the pontificate of gregory the great ( r.590–604 ). See also abstinence . Dust and ashes See under dust . Oak before the ash See under oak . Wear sackcloth and ashes, To See...

ash

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The Oxford Dictionary of Idioms (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
104 words

... ash dust and ashes : see dust . in sackcloth and ashes : see sackcloth . rake over the ashes : see rake . ...

ash

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Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2021
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
251 words

...ash [OE] The two meanings of ash, the powder and the tree, started out as two completely different words. In Old English æsce or æxe referred to the powder, and æsc referred to the tree. The origins of something turning to ashes in your mouth can be traced back to John de Mandeville’s Travels , a 14th-century work claiming to be an account of the author’s travels in the East, where there is a description of a legendary fruit known as the Dead Sea fruit, sometimes also called the apple of Sodom. Although the fruit was appetizing to look at, it...

Ash

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Dictionary of American Family Names (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Names studies
Length:
135 words

... US frequency (2010): 21030 1 English: from Middle English asche ‘ash tree’ (Old English æsc ), hence a topographic name for someone living by an ash tree or a habitational name from any of the many places in southern and central England named with this word (Derbyshire, Dorset, Hampshire, Herefordshire, Kent, Surrey, Shropshire, Somerset, and elsewhere). 2 Americanized form of German Asch and Esch , the latter ultimately also of Swiss German origin (see Oesch ). 3 Americanized form (translation into English) of French Dufresne , with the same...

Ash Wednesday

Ash Wednesday   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
6 words

... Wednesday First day of ...

ash cone

ash cone   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Environment and Conservation (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

... cone A steep‐sided volcano composed of fine volcanic ash erupted from the...

ash fall

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A Dictionary of Geography (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2023

... fall The precipitation of volcanic ash (tephra) during and after a volcanic...

Ash protein

Ash protein   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
6 words

... protein another name for Grb2...

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