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antinomianism

Subject: Religion

The belief held by various sects, but particularly by radical protestant movements of the 16th and 17th centuries, that certain chosen Christians are by faith or by predestination unable ...

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The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
56 words

... The belief held by various sects, but particularly by radical protestant movements of the 16th and 17th centuries, that certain chosen Christians are by faith or by predestination unable to sin, and are hence set free from the requirement to obey any moral law. Antinomianism is frequently associated with unconventional life styles and sexual...

antinomianism

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The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
96 words

... (Greek, anti ‘against’ + nomos ‘law’) The belief that God’s grace liberates Christians from an obligation to moral law. The teaching of antinomianism was primarily an early church phenomenon. From 500–1500 it occurred occasionally, usually in combination with *mysticism or Gnosticism. Some groups, condemned as heretical, practised sexual licence—at times even including *prostitution —as an expression of Christian freedom. Antinomianism was rare within Judaism or Islam. See also free spirit, doctrine of the ; heresy . John C....

antinomianism

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The Oxford Dictionary of the Renaissance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early Modern History (1500 to 1700)
Length:
136 words

... , A medieval Latin coinage from the Greek (literally ‘against law’) used to denote the doctrine that Christians are exempted from the moral law, and are instead subject only to the law of grace. At the Reformation, antinomian teaching emerged as a corollary of Luther 's doctrine of justification by faith alone. The German reformer Johann Agricola advocated antinomianism, which caused him to become involved in heated controversy with Luther. There was also an antinomian strain in Thomas Müntzer 's doctrine of inner revelation, which derived...

antinomianism

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The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 rev. ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
142 words

...antinomianism . A general name for the view that Christians are by grace set free from the need of observing any moral law. It was attributed to St Paul by his opponents ( Rom. 3: 8 ) because of his disparagement of the Mosaic Law in favour of the Law of the New Covenant ‘written in the heart’—an internal impulse towards good—and strenuously repudiated by him. The charge of antinomianism was plausibly made against many of the Gnostic sects, e.g. the Carpocratians , who held that, as matter was so sharply opposed to spirit, bodily actions were...

Antinomianism

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The Concise Oxford Companion to American Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002
Subject:
Literature
Length:
72 words

...Antinomianism , any theory that holds that moral law as such, or the Old Testament legal system specifically, is not binding upon Christians. In America the Antinomian controversy was precipitated by Anne Hutchinson , who was supported, in her protest against the legal system of the Massachusetts Puritans, by her brother-in-law John Wheelwright , Governor Vane , and other Bostonians. She was opposed by John Winthrop and by the people and clergy of the rural...

antinomianism

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The Concise Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
68 words

... . A general name for the view that Christians are by grace set free from the need to observe any moral law. Various Gnostic sects held that, as matter was sharply opposed to spirit, bodily actions were indifferent and therefore licentiousness was admissible. At the Reformation antinomian teaching was revived, e.g. by the Anabaptists , as following from the Lutheran doctrine of justification by...

ANTINOMIANISM

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The Oxford Dictionary of the Jewish Religion (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Religion
Length:
515 words

...Concerns about antinomianism are common in medieval Jewish literature. All who ventured into the field of taʿamei ha-mitsvot (suggesting reasons for the commandments [ see Commandments, Reasons for ]) had to confront this issue. Some scholars, including Maimonides, thought that without a rational basis, people would reject the law (agnostic antinomianism), whereas others believed that by offering reasons, obedience to the law would be undermined (philosophical antinomianism). Mystical and messianic movements were often suspected of antinomian tendencies....

Antinomianism

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The Oxford Companion to American Literature (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Literature
Length:
148 words

... , any theory that holds that moral law as such, or the Old Testament legal system specifically, is not binding upon Christians. In America the Antinomian controversy was precipitated by Anne Hutchinson , who was supported, in her protest against the legal system of the Massachusetts Puritans, by her brother-in-law John Wheelwright , Governor Vane , and other Bostonians. She was opposed by John Winthrop and by the people and clergy of the rural districts. The theological dispute became a political one, and, in 1637 , when Winthrop was elected...

antinomianism

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A Dictionary of Sociology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Social sciences, Sociology
Length:
145 words

... The belief that one's religious commitments or faith exempt one from the legal or moral codes of the wider society (hence ‘anti-norms’). Antinomianism has been a characteristic of particular sects throughout the history of Christianity. Most notably, certain radical Protestant sectarians of the 16th and 17th centuries extended the Calvinist doctrine of predestination in this way, arguing that those who possessed an inner certainty of their own election are no longer capable of sin and are therefore freed from the restrictions of conventional...

antinomianism

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Clyde Binfield

The Oxford Companion to British History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
112 words

... ( ‘against the law’ ) held that the moral law was not a rule of life for believers, the opposition of matter and spirit implying the indifference of bodily functions. It was an occupational hazard of Lutheranism and Calvinism alike, lurking in the doctrine of justification by faith alone and the righteousness implied by such faith. Propounded during the Reformation by the Lutheran John Agricola , it was taken up by some anabaptists , and championed in England by Tobias Crisp ( 1600–43 ), flourishing in the 1650s. Its most egregious...

antinomianism

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A Dictionary of the Bible (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Religion
Length:
138 words

... The doctrine held by a group of Christians taught by Paul that Christ has freed us from slavery under the * Law , as if implying freedom from any restraints at all. This travesty of his view is repudiated by Paul in Rom. 6; and Matt. 5: 17–18 also asserts the principle that laws and customs have a continuing validity in regulating private and public existence. Antinomianism was not an intellectual justification of human frailty but a serious claim that the Christian * life was a life of the * spirit , not of the * body ; the Christian was above...

Antinomianism

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The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Religion
Length:
68 words

... (Gk., anti , ‘against’, + nomos , law) A tendency in all religions, for some among those who believe to regard themselves as so possessed of grace/salvation/enlightenment, etc., that existing laws are no longer applicable. It may also apply to an attitude which regards the keeping of rules and laws as an impediment on the way to freedom/release/salvation, etc., because it produces a legalistic understanding of actions and...

Antinomianism

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The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Reformation

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Religion
Length:
2,357 words

... . Throughout the sixteenth century disputes occurred over the place of the law in Protestant theology and practice. In its broadest application antinomianism means simply license. John Calvin accused his libertine opponents of wanting to do away with the law ( Institutes , II.vii.13). This same usage occurred in Puritan disputes in early seventeenth-century England and surfaced at nearly the same time in clashes between Anne Hutchinson and John Cotton in New England. In its narrower definition, antinomianism describes one set of disputes...

Antinomianism

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James D. G. Dunn

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Bible and Ethics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Religion, Philosophy
Length:
2,218 words

... “Antinomianism” is a coinage from ancient Greek— anti (“against”), nomos (“law”). It appears to have been first used by Martin Luther to designate a sectarian interpretation of his doctrine on “justification by faith”: that as salvation is by grace and through faith alone, the Christian was not obligated to obey the moral law. Luther strongly refuted such antinomian teaching, but ironically it continued to be provoked by the sharp antithesis that Lutheranism set between “gospel” and “law,” and the Antinomian controversy bubbled up in...

antinomianism

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Australian Law Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Law
Length:
42 words

...antinomianism The opposite of legalism . In law, an antinomian approach advocates freedom from rules in a code; it does not imply lawlessness, but rather that decisions are better made with unfettered discretion . In evidence the doctrine of free proof is an...

antinomianism

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The New Zealand Oxford Dictionary

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
44 words
antinomianism

antinomianism noun   Reference library

Australian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
89 words
antinomianism

antinomianism  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
The belief held by various sects, but particularly by radical protestant movements of the 16th and 17th centuries, that certain chosen Christians are by faith or by predestination unable to sin, and ...
antinomian

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The Oxford Companion to English Literature (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature
Length:
57 words

... One who maintains, through a misreading of arguments in Paul 's Epistles, that the moral law is not binding upon Christians under the law of grace. The term was coined by Luther to attack Agricola (see Robert Browning 's ‘Johannes Agricola in Meditation’), and it was often used against radical Protestants. See Hutchinsonians ....

Antinomian

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Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

... (Greek anti , ‘against’, and nomos , ‘law’) A name for one who believes that Christians are not bound to observe the ‘law of God’, but ‘may continue in sin that grace may abound’. The term was first applied to John Agricola ( 1492–1566 ) by Martin Luther ( 1483–1546 ), and was given to a sect that appeared in Germany about 1535 . It was put forward as an excuse for immorality by extremist sects from early Christian times and appeared in England during the commonwealth period....

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