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analogic communication

1. Meaning ‘given off’ (Goffman) through body language. Such communication is typically unintentional, and unavoidably ‘gives us away’, revealing such things as our moods, ...

analogic communication

analogic communication   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Media and Communication (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Media studies
Length:
102 words

... communication 1. Any communication through modalities based on graded relationships on a continuum rather than being based on discrete elements such as words. See also analogue ; media forms ; compare digital . 2. Meaning ‘given off’ (Goffman) through body language . Such communication is typically unintentional, and unavoidably ‘gives us away’, revealing such things as our moods, attitudes , intentions, and truthfulness (or otherwise). See also communicative behaviour ; leakage . 3. In some contexts (e.g. therapy), an emphasis on process...

analogic communication

analogic communication  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Media studies
1. Meaning ‘given off’ (Goffman) through body language. Such communication is typically unintentional, and unavoidably ‘gives us away’, revealing such things as our moods, attitudes, intentions, and ...
Language

Language   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,614 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...Walker was writing was associated with men like Joseph *Priestley , innovators in language as well as in politics. Priestley's approach to questions of correctness was a flexible one. He was prepared to appeal to rational analogy which would make the language consistent with itself in questions of disputed usage, although analogies with the classical languages were explicitly ruled out in his Rudiments of English Grammar ( 1768 ). But the final decision had to wait until ‘all-governing custom shall declare in favour of the one or other’. Priestley's...

Natural Philosophy (Science)

Natural Philosophy (Science)   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,186 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...matter—as both Blake and *Wordsworth saw it—by evincing the dynamic and opposing powers and qualities of nature. Here the chemistry of Humphry Davy—who discussed poetry with Coleridge—was the great hope because, in contrast with the atomism of John Dalton, it stressed analogies between the forces of electricity, galvanism, and chemical affinity. Combining this with his German reading, Coleridge elaborated a transcendental philosophy in which nature was a system of polar forces interacting in a historical sequence culminating in the human mind, which in...

Poetry

Poetry   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,432 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...of opposite and discordant qualities’. An artist of the grotesque, Blake sees black where they see white. Neither is the Lake view Byron's view, who like Blake also refuses to spiritualize nature. One of his typical moves, for example, is to study natural phenomena for moral analogies: the remarkable *epic similes in The Giaour ( 1813 ) provide good examples of this procedure. On the other hand, the sharp accuracy of Byron's descriptions, so pleasing to Ruskin, indicate the fundamentally scientific spirit of his Romanticism. Under other circumstances, of...

unintentional communication

unintentional communication  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Media studies
Compare intentional communication.1. Meanings ‘given off’ (Goffman) by an individual’s body language through nonverbal leakage, or unconsciously signified by their appearance, dress, or behaviour, ...
analogy

analogy  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Philosophy
A respect in which one thing is similar to another. The analogical extension of terms is the way in which a term covers similar things: people, bottles, and rivers have mouths. Shops, boxes, ...
entertainment function

entertainment function  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Media studies
A function of both interpersonal and mass communication in which the sender seeks to please and the receiver is expected to enjoy. For Schramm, entertainment is one of the key functions of ...
product-symbol format

product-symbol format  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Media studies
A style of advertising that tends to feature abstract symbolic associations (e.g. with status, glamour, beauty, or health). The product is depicted within a context, though typically natural or ...
analogical thinking

analogical thinking  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Media studies
1. (analogical reasoning, metaphorical thinking) Generating ideas through making analogies between different phenomena.2. According to Lévi-Strauss, the way that people make connections between the ...
media grammar

media grammar  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Media studies
1. A concept drawn from an analogy with language in relation to patterns structuring form and content in a particular medium.2. In media production, a set of conventions, understood as rules, ...
Claude Elwood Shannon

Claude Elwood Shannon  

(1916–2001) American mathematicianBorn in Gaylord, Michigan, Shannon graduated from the University of Michigan in 1936. He later worked both at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Bell ...
masthead

masthead  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Media studies
(by analogy with the flag at the head of a ship's mast)1. In popular usage, the title of a newspaper or magazine displayed at the top of the front page (technically the flag or title).2. In ...
language games

language games  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Philosophy
An analogy made by Wittgenstein between speaking a language and playing a game. Different uses of language (e.g. apologies or requests) have different rules which do not exist outside of social ...
law of social impact

law of social impact  

A proposition introduced by the US psychologist Bibb Latané (born 1937) in an article in the journal American Psychologist in 1981, designed to explain social influence effects, including persuasion, ...
inoculation theory

inoculation theory  

A theory of resistance to persuasion according to which most ordinary attitudes and beliefs are more or less resistant to change through having been exposed to repeated mild attacks. The theory ...
connectivity

connectivity  

1 of a computer network. A rather loosely defined property referring either to the extent to which sites wishing to connect to the network are actually equipped with a network connection, or to the ...
deep structure

deep structure  

Reference type:
Overview Page
1. (deep grammar) In linguistics, following Chomsky, a fundamental abstract level of grammatical organization underlying the surface structure of sentences, which are generated by applying ...
systems theory

systems theory  

Reference type:
Overview Page
An interdisciplinary approach that analyses structures as interrelated webs of interacting parts performing particular functions. See also bottom-up processing; communication network; cybernetics; ...
polysemy

polysemy  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Media studies
The property of a word or lexeme of having several different meanings, a typical English example being the word kind, which can mean type (a different kind of food); quality (a difference of kind ...

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