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amusements and recreation

Dickens had a profound interest in popular recreation, and reference to it suffuses his early fiction and his journalism throughout his life. His basic philosophy can be found in the ... ...

amusements and recreation

amusements and recreation   Reference library

Hugh Cunningham

The Oxford Reader's Companion to Dickens

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
2,891 words

...the liberating forces of fancy and imagination could and should be allowed free play; hence his defence of fairy tales (‘Frauds on the Fairies’, HW 1 October 1853 ), and his frequent invocation of the impact of reading on children. It was equally crucial that fancy and imagination, nourished by memories of childhood reading and events, should remain alive in adulthood. They were in a real sense what made life worth living; without fancy and imagination, you became a Scrooge. And it was through amusements and recreations that you could regain or maintain...

amusements and recreation

amusements and recreation  

Dickens had a profound interest in popular recreation, and reference to it suffuses his early fiction and his journalism throughout his life. His basic philosophy can be found in the ...
Theatre

Theatre   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,088 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...and literature in any kingdom, and the taste of the people, are best known by the amusements they follow: those of the theatre are the most rational in which the human mind can delight.’ The construction of a playhouse was often associated with the development of other cultural activities such as *circulating libraries , bookshops, *coffeehouses , and assembly rooms which not only proclaimed the civility of a town but also stimulated the local economy. Playgoing was an integral part of cultural and political rituals such as elections, the assizes, and...

quoits

quoits  

Reference type:
Overview Page
An outdoor game in which a ring, usually made of iron, is aimed at a target stuck in the ground, commonly a pin or a peg. It was played in England in the 14th century, and branded as illegal by a ...
character building

character building  

Reference type:
Overview Page
The process whereby a particular activity develops desirable values in an individual. Sport has frequently been claimed to be a way of character building. Through learning to play in teams, cooperate ...
MARCHANT, John

MARCHANT, John (fl. 1750)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Children's Literature (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Children's literature studies
Length:
96 words

...MARCHANT, John ( fl. 1750 ) English author of anti-papistical tracts who wrote two unusual books of verse for children: Puerilia: or, Amusements for the Young ( 1751 ) and Lusus Juveniles: or, Youth’s Recreation ( 1753 ). The first book begins with poems for ‘Little Misses’ and ‘Young Masters’, describing activities enjoyed by children of either sex, then comes a set of ‘Songs’ that include verses for each month of the year. Marchant’s second volume includes such unlikely pieces as ‘Decoy-Ducks: or, the Pleasures of a Brothel’, which warns young men...

Entertainment

Entertainment   Reference library

Apostolos Karpozilos

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
169 words

.... For amusement the Byz. enjoyed games and spectacles such as chariot races in the hippodrome, triumphal processions, visits of foreign dignitaries and ambassadors, religious festivities and panegyreis (see Fair ), banquets , and ceremonies that provided recreation and excitement. The streets were also the setting for various kinds of shows with exotic or strange animals and wild beasts. Performances were given by acrobats, jugglers, magicians, actors , and mimes . Apart from this kind of popular entertainment people found recreation in board ...

magic lanterns

magic lanterns   Reference library

Grahame Smith

The Oxford Reader's Companion to Dickens

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
112 words

...lanterns were a widespread medium for instruction and entertainment in the Victorian period, part of a movement towards visualization which forms an important context for Dickens 's work ( see amusements and recreation ). Writing Dombey and Son in Lausanne, he complained of the ‘absence of streets’ provided by the ‘magic lantern’ of London ( 30 August 1846 ). By Dickens's day they had achieved a high level of sophistication. Multiple projection made possible dissolves from one image into another and the simulation of such effects of movement as the...

Amusement Parks and Theme Parks

Amusement Parks and Theme Parks   Reference library

Lauren Rabinovitz

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Social History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...built and operated amusement parks. For example, in Nashville, Tennessee, the undertaker Preston Taylor ran Greenwood Park from 1905 to 1949 . His park featured a swimming pool, rides, and a baseball diamond. At these parks, swimming pools and exhibition baseball games were central, because these were the very recreations to which African Americans were otherwise denied access. Meanings. Amusement parks were important targets for debate about modern culture and a focus for defining what counted as social values. For some, the amusement park’s...

‘In the Hunting Field’

‘In the Hunting Field’   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
194 words

...understood the sport, supposing it to consist of jumping over five-barred gates. For Trollope it meant recreation and exercise. Hunting was a gracious social occasion with due courtesies at the meeting place before the whip led the way followed by the Master deeply aware of his responsibilities ‘for the amusement of a hundred and fifty gentlemen … who have turned out of bed at seven o'clock on a winter morning’. Farmer Rudge represented the slow and steady kind of hunting to which Trollope pledged his allegiance. ‘Fifty years of close study in any art...

Leisure.

Leisure.   Reference library

Paul S. Boyer

The Oxford Companion to United States History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
1,264 words

...developed, movies and recorded music made their appearance. Amusement parks modeled on the Midway Plaisance at the 1893 Chicago World's Fair sprang up, including three built by entrepreneurs at New York's Coney Island between 1895 and 1903 . Progressive-era reformers worried about this explosion of urban commercialized leisure. While some urged dance-hall regulation and movie censorship , others organized civic pageants to entertain and instruct the immigrant masses and established supervised playgrounds to provide recreation and moral guidance for...

fairs and itinerant entertainers

fairs and itinerant entertainers   Reference library

Paul Schlicke

The Oxford Reader's Companion to Dickens

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
589 words

...pleasures, and the suppression of the most famous of them, Bartholomew Fair , in 1840 by the Corporation of the City of London was widely seen as an attack on the rights of the common people ( see London: entertainment ). Always as interested in the spectators as in the spectacle, Dickens was convinced that ‘the many are at least as capable of decent enjoyment as the few’ (‘The Queen's Coronation’, Examiner , 1 July 1838 ) and throughout his career he defended people's right to ‘harmless recreations and healthful amusements’ ( SUTH ), as relief from...

Aboriginal games

Aboriginal games   Reference library

Colin Howell

The Oxford Companion to Canadian History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
339 words

...sport and gaming traditions reflected the requirements of a hunting and gathering society. Various competitions such as foot and horse racing, spear throwing, and archery competitions refined hunting skills, and widely played games of chance not only provided amusement but also taught an acceptance of fate and stoicism in defeat. Stick and ball games were also popular among Aboriginal peoples across North America, and often were connected with religious ceremonies. The Native game of baggataway, or lacrosse, for example, was thought to heal sickness and...

Baylis, Lilian

Baylis, Lilian (9 May 1874)   Reference library

The Continuum Companion to Twentieth Century Theatre

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
389 words

...Baylis eventually dedicated the Wells to opera and ballet and the Old Vic to drama, thereby laying the foundations of the English National Opera, the Royal Ballet and the National Theatre – a unique and outstanding achievement in the British theatre. Both theatre managements, however, maintained the mandate of The Sadler's Wells Foundation's Declaration of Trust ( 1932 ) that performances be ‘suited for the recreation and instruction of the poorer classes’ at prices that ‘will make them available for artisans and labourers’, reserving higher-priced engagements...

character building

character building   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Sports Studies

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Social sciences, Society and culture
Length:
359 words

...with others, and the like, it is seen as not just a reflection of wider social values, but as generative of such values. Although there is scepticism about the role of sport in character building, historical analyses have shown the place that sport played in this sphere. In Britain in 1864 the Clarendon Commission stated that ‘cricket and football pitches…are not merely places of amusement; they help to form some of the most valuable social qualities and manly virtues, and they hold, like the classroom and the boarding house, a distinct and important place...

Sunday Under Three Heads

Sunday Under Three Heads   Reference library

Paul Schlicke

The Oxford Reader's Companion to Dickens

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
340 words

...had been rejected by Parliament in 1833 and 1834 , and another was lost in 1837 when Parliament was prorogued on the death of William IV . In common with radicals in the House, such as William cobbett and Edward bulwer-Lytton , whose arguments the pamphlet closely followed, Dickens saw the bill as a piece of class legislation, cynically designed to forbid innocent amusements to the poor on their one day of rest, without interfering with the pleasures of the well-to-do ( Hansard , 29 March 1833 and 30 April 1834 ). Dickens dedicated Sunday...

quoits

quoits   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Sports Studies

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Social sciences, Society and culture
Length:
260 words

...century, and branded as illegal by a statute of 1388 . It was considered that the game undermined archery practice and other forms of martial preparation at a time of elongated war with the French. The game's popularity persisted, despite the legislation, and it was one of the activities common to the festivities of holiday times such as Easter in the later 18th century. In the early 1800s, as Robert Malcolmson documents, drawing on a source describing the ‘agriculture of Derbyshire’, ‘Quoits seemed a very prevalent amusement of the lower and more idle...

Zoos

Zoos   Reference library

Ryan T. Perry

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Cultural and Intellectual History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...the inadequate care provided by many zoos and questioned their ethical right to hold animals in captivity. With a renewed focus on conservation and education, zoos remained a touchstone for America's relationship with the natural world—mediating between scientific inquiry and popular recreation. [ See also Circuses ; Conservation Movement ; Conservatism ; Parks, Urban ; Smithsonian Institution ; and Urban Culture . ] Bibliography Hancocks, David . A Different Nature: The Paradoxical World of Zoos and Their Uncertain Future . Berkeley: University...

Brown, William Alexander

Brown, William Alexander (1820s)   Reference library

Desha Osborne

Dictionary of Caribbean and Afro–Latin American Biography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
876 words

...and poetry. Belizean playwright Sidney Mejia wrote Life and Times of Chatoyer: AKA “The Drama of King Shotaway” in 2012 as a recreation of Brown’s lost play. [ See also Chatoyer, Joseph . ] Bibliography “African Amusements.” National Advocate , 21 September 1821; 25 September 1821. Longworth’s American Almanac, New York Register, and City Directory . New York: David Longworth, 1815–1827. McAllister, Marvin . White People Do Not Know How to Behave at Entertainments Designed for Ladies and Gentlemen of Colour: William Brown’s African and...

leisure

leisure   Reference library

Douglas J. Allen

The Oxford Companion to British History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
486 words

...may be defined as the amusements, entertainments, and creative pursuits enjoyed by people in their non-working hours. Our modern understanding of leisure is different from the classical ideal of the worthwhile pursuit of the arts by a leisured class freed from the necessity of work. Contrary to its innocuous image, leisure is in fact one of the most controversial and contested areas of British social and cultural history, with a tradition of class-related disputes over how leisure time should be spent and how far it should be controlled. An underlying...

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