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Overview

amphibia

A class of anamniote vertebrate animals in the superclass Tetrapoda. They are characterized by having gills during the larval stage; these are typically replaced by lungs in the adults. ...

Amphibia

Amphibia   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
37 words

... a class of anamniote vertebrate animals in the superclass Tetrapoda. They are characterized by having gills during the larval stage; these are typically replaced by lungs in the adults. The skin is moist, glandular, and...

Amphibia

Amphibia   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Zoology (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
153 words

...is soft, naked (non-scaly), rich in mucous and poison glands, and important in cutaneous respiration . There are about 7000 extant species. Most are found in damp environments and they occur on all continents except Antarctica. https://www.shsu.edu/~bio_mlt/AMPHIBIA.html Description of the class Amphibia...

Amphibia

Amphibia   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Geology and Earth Sciences (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

... ( amphibians ) Class that appeared first in the Devonian , having evolved from rhipidistian (lobe-finned) fish ( see rhipidistia ). They flourished in the Carboniferous and Permian . During the Triassic some forms, e.g. Mastodontosaurus , grew to 6 m long, and the first modern types were established. Today the amphibians are represented by just three groups, of which the Urodela (salamanders) and Anura (frogs and toads) are the best known (the third group, the caecilians (Apoda), are worm-like and burrowing). Most amphibians are found in damp...

Amphibia

Amphibia   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Biology (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
194 words

...Amphibia The class of vertebrate chordates ( see chordata ) that contains over 7000 known species of frogs, toads, newts, and salamanders. The amphibians evolved in the Devonian period (about 370 million years ago) as the first vertebrates to occupy the land, and many of their characteristics are adaptations to terrestrial life. All adult amphibians have a passage linking the roof of the mouth with the nostrils so they may breathe air and keep the mouth closed. The moist scaleless skin is used to supplement the lungs in gas exchange. They have no diaphragm,...

Amphibia

Amphibia   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Ecology (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... ( amphibians ) A chordate class represented today by just three groups, of which the salamanders (Urodela) and frogs and toads (Anura) are the best known. They are poikilothermic vertebrates. The majority are terrestrial but develop by a larval phase (tadpoles) in water. The skin is soft, naked (non-scaly), rich in mucous and poison glands, and important in cutaneous respiration. There are about 3000 extant species. Most are found in damp environments and they occur on all continents except Antarctica. The class was formerly much more varied and in...

Amphibia

Amphibia   Reference library

The New Oxford Dictionary for Scientific Writers and Editors (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009

... (cap. A) A class of vertebrates containing the frogs, toads, newts, and salamanders. Individual name and adjectival form: amphibian ( compare amphibious...

amphibia

amphibia  

A class of anamniote vertebrate animals in the superclass Tetrapoda. They are characterized by having gills during the larval stage; these are typically replaced by lungs in the adults. The skin is ...
cutaneous respiration

cutaneous respiration  

Breathing through the skin; in some vertebrates the body surface has become highly vascularized for gaseous exchange. Such exchange is of particular importance in the class Amphibia, where mucous ...
mesolecithal

mesolecithal  

Applied to an egg that has a yolk of intermediate size and strongly concentrated in one hemisphere, typical of Petromyzonidae, Acipenseridae, Amiidae, Lepidosirenidae, and Amphibia. Compare ...
neuromast

neuromast  

In fish and some Amphibia, the basic receptor units of the acoustico-lateralis system. The receptor cells are surrounded by a clump of supporting cells, the units being covered by a gelatinous ...
newt

newt  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Any of numerous species of tailed amphibians of Europe, Asia, and North America. The common European newt, Triturus vulgaris, is terrestrial, except during the breeding season, when it is aquatic ...
buccal force pump

buccal force pump  

Respiratory system, typical of the Amphibia, whereby air is forced into the lungs by raising the floor of the mouth while the valvular nostril is closed. Compare costal respiration.
Eusthenopteron

Eusthenopteron  

(class Osteichthyes, subclass Crossopterygii)A genus of lobe-finned fish, known from the Devonian of Europe and N. America, that exhibited a number of advanced characters (e.g. lungs and strong ...
precoracoid

precoracoid  

A bone of the pectoral girdle, present as an element of the coracoid in some Amphibia and as a separate bone in many Reptilia and some Monotremata, but which is vestigial or absent as a distinct ...
lateral line

lateral line  

A system of receptors, often embedded in special grooves in the skin of an animal, that is capable of detecting vibrations (and therefore movements) in the water surrounding the animal. In most fish, ...
aquatic resources

aquatic resources  

The living resources of aquatic habitats, which include fish, invertebrates, and amphibians.
Ascaphidae

Ascaphidae  

; class Amphibia, order Anura)A monotypic family (Ascaphus truei) of amphibians, found in mountain streams in western N. America, that, like Leiopelmatidae, have nine amphicoelous vertebrae and free ...
Atelopodidae

Atelopodidae  

(class Amphibia, order Anura)A family of small, brightly coloured, often poisonous, tree frogs. The Bidder's organ found in males indicates a bufonid relationship. Like toads, most walk rather than ...
Pseudidae

Pseudidae  

(class Amphibia, order Anura)A small family of amphibians which are related to the aquatic tree frogs (Hylidae). The vertebrae are procoelous, they have an extra phalanx on each digit, and the thumb ...
Peodytidae

Peodytidae  

(class Amphibia, order Anura)A family of amphibians that are related to the spadefoot toads (Pelobatidae) but have long, leaping, hind limbs, which lack digging structures. There are two species, ...

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