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ambulatory

1 Any place in which to process, walk, or promenade, whether partially or totally covered or uncovered, such as an ambulatio or a cloister. 2 Aisle ...

ambulatory

ambulatory ([Co])   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Archaeology (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2021
Subject:
Archaeology
Length:
11 words

... [Co] Covered portico surrounding the inner shrine of a...

ambulatory

ambulatory   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Art Terms (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
41 words

... A covered place in which to walk, such as a cloister . It is more specifically used to describe the aisle , used for processions, enclosing a sanctuary and joining two chancel-aisles behind the high altar—as in an ambulatory...

ambulatory

ambulatory   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
40 words

...ambulatory The ‘walking-space’ which arises when an apsidal sanctuary is surrounded by continuous aisles . The ambulatory is bounded on one side by the arches of the sanctuary, and on the other may give access to a series of...

ambulatory

ambulatory   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
21 words

... . The ‘walking-space’ created when an apsidal sanctuary in certain churches of the Norman period is surrounded by continuous aisles...

ambulatory

ambulatory   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
104 words

... A walkway surrounding the *apse or *chancel end of a church, usually a continuation of the aisles, serving to facilitate circulation behind the sanctuary. Ambulatories existed already in the early Christian period (for example, S. Sebastiano , *Rome ). From the Romanesque period onwards they could be extended by means of radiating *chapels (for example, Cluny III , late 11th century). See also art and architecture: romanesque . Sible de Blaauw J. Herschman , ‘The Norman Ambulatory of Le Mans Cathedral and the chevet of the Cathedral of...

ambulatory

ambulatory adj.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Nursing (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2021
Subject:
Medicine and health
Length:
24 words

... [am-bew- layt -er-i] adj. relating to walking. a. treatment treatment that enables or encourages a patient to remain on his or her...

Ambulatory

Ambulatory   Reference library

William Loerke and Katherine M. Kiefer

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
139 words

... , a passage around a major space. Prokopios of Caesarea ( Buildings 1.1.58) uses the term aule (aisle?, lit. “courtyard”) for the colonnaded spaces around the naos (nave) of Hagia Sophia , Constantinople. Ambulatories facilitate movement in a church without disturbing central and sacred areas; they can give independent access to the pastophoria or lead to a contiguous church ( Lips monastery , Constantinople; Hosios Loukas ). The ambulatories also served as spaces for ecclesiastical gatherings and for burials. The “ambulatory church” type...

ambulatory

ambulatory   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Christian Art and Architecture (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
120 words

... (Lat. ambulare , to walk) The passageway behind the choir of a medieval church, surrounding the area of the high altar, and designed usually as an extension from the aisles. It was of particular use in pilgrimage churches, since it gave easy access to shrines and to subsidiary chapels without disturbing services in the choir itself ( see altarpiece ). An ambulatory with three, five, or occasionally seven (though this is rare) chapels projecting from it, so as to increase the number of side chapels and therefore the number of altars, was common...

Ambulatory

Ambulatory   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Medieval Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...to the development of the ambulatory was the introduction of the double ambulatory. It occurs at Saint-Denis Abbey ( c . 1140), where the shallow radiating chapels emerge without subdivision from the outer ambulatory, each chapel and aisle bay covered by a single vault, and at the contemporary church of St Martin-des-Champs, Paris, where the plan is repeated apart from a large axial chapel in the form of a trefoil. Notre-Dame ( 1163–1250 ), Paris, was built with a double ambulatory. The awkwardly shaped ambulatory bays were vaulted in a particularly...

ambulatory

ambulatory   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Architecture (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2021
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
60 words

... 1. Any place in which to process or promenade, whether partially or totally covered or uncovered, e.g. ambulatio or cloister . 2. Aisle linking the chancel -aisles behind the high-altar in a large church: it can be canted, semicircular, or straight on plan, with chapels to the east and the sanctuary to the west....

ambulatory

ambulatory (of a will)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Law (10 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Law
Length:
48 words

... adj . ( of a will ) Taking effect not from when it was made but from the death of the testator. Thus descriptions of property bequeathed or of beneficiaries are taken to refer to property or persons existing at that time. The will remains revocable until...

ambulatory

ambulatory   Reference library

Anthony Quiney

The Oxford Companion to Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
106 words

... A walkway, usually in the form of an aisle , around a sanctuary. It originated in France as a processional passage around a shrine accommodated within a crypt, e.g. at Chartres Cathedral (after 858). It typically leads around an apse, providing access to chapels opening off it. This pattern was established at St Philibert, Tournus, France ( c .979–1019 ), and adopted for the churches of the pilgrimage road, starting with St Martin, Tours (after 997 ), and including Santiago de Compostela (Galicia, Spain). Widely adopted for Romanesque churches,...

ambulatory

ambulatory   Reference library

Australian Law Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Law
Length:
214 words

...ambulatory ( adj ) (Latin ambulatorius , of or pertaining to a walker; moveable) Capable of ‘moving on’ – being changed to account for later developments. In statutory interpretation courts perform an ambulatory role when they construe provisions dynamically, in a way that amends or expands the original intention, if the text allows it (e.g. to cover new technology or social practices). See R v Gee (2003) 212 CLR 230. Dynamic or ambulatory interpretation is now orthodox but was once considered illegitimate (e.g. by austin , who called it ‘spurious...

ambulatory church

ambulatory church   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Architecture (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2021
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
52 words

... church 1. Church with an ambulatory between the sanctuary and chapels to the east. 2. Early-Christian or Byzantine church with a domed area bounded on at least three sides by aisles and galleries , so forming a cross on plan, also known as a cross-domed church ....

ambulatory care

ambulatory care   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Public Health (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...ambulatory care Literally, medical care of persons who are able to walk in and out of a clinic. The care may be primary, episodic, or part of continuing care for an existing condition. Typically, physicians providing ambulatory care are working under time pressure, which is unfortunate if it leaves no time for initiatives aimed at opportunistic early disease detection. ...

ambulatory

ambulatory   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
18 words

... XVII. — L. ambulātōrius (in medL. ambulātōrium as sb. ), f. pp. stem of ambulāre walk; see -ORY 1 , -ORY 2...

ambulatory

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New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
1,323 words

... • beery , bleary, cheery, dearie, dreary, Dun Laoghaire, eerie, eyrie ( US aerie), Kashmiri, leery, peri, praemunire, query, smeary, teary, theory, weary • Deirdre • incendiary • intermediary • subsidiary • auxiliary , ciliary, domiciliary • apiary • topiary • farriery • furriery • justiciary • bestiary , vestiary • breviary • aviary • hosiery • diary , enquiry, expiry, fiery, friary, inquiry, miry, priory, spiry, wiry • podiatry , psychiatry • dowry , floury, flowery, loury, showery, towery • brewery • jewellery ( US jewelry) • ...

ambulatory

ambulatory   Quick reference

Oxford Dictionary of English (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
109 words
ambulatory

ambulatory   Quick reference

New Oxford American Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
114 words
ambulatory

ambulatory   Reference library

Australian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
47 words

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