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agate ware

*Pottery made to resemble agate. Different coloured clays were combined to imitate the veining of the hard stone. It was made by the Romans and revived in the 18th century in ...

agate ware

agate ware   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Art Terms (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
37 words

... ware Pottery made to resemble agate . Different coloured clays were combined to imitate the veining of the hard stone. It was made by the Romans and revived in the 18th century in Staffordshire...

Agate ware

Agate ware   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
101 words

... ware . Pottery made of clays of different colours; as the clays spin on the potter's wheel, striations similar to those in natural agate are formed. A similar effect is sometimes achieved with surface slips. Agate ware was made in classical Rome, and was revived in 18th-century Staffordshire, notably in the Wedgwood and Whieldon factories. In the late 20th century the American potter Michelle Erickson ( b 1960 ) revived the tradition of agate ware. P. Philip : Achieving Agate , Cer. Rev ., cxvi (March–April 1989), pp. 8–11 R. Hunter : The Stylistic...

agate ware

agate ware  

Reference type:
Overview Page
*Pottery made to resemble agate. Different coloured clays were combined to imitate the veining of the hard stone. It was made by the Romans and revived in the 18th century in Staffordshire.
Design

Design   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
6,178 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...held belief that the Etruscans made the finest antique vases. By selling ‘Vases, Urns and other ornaments after the Etruscan, Greek and Roman modells’, he aimed to become ‘Vase Maker General to the Universe’. He produced glazes which imitated Roman stones—marble, granite, agate, lapis lazuli, porphyry—and transformed a traditional Staffordshire body known as ‘Egyptian black’ into the hard ‘Black Basalt’. In 1769 he took out a patent for ‘encaustic’ or matt enamel painting to emulate classical Greek red-figured vases. By the mid-1770s he had perfected...

Marbled ware

Marbled ware  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Pottery decoration resembling coloured marble or agate. The effect is achieved by twisting together clays of different colours, or by using a multi-coloured slip or by colouring the glaze with ...
Staffordshire

Staffordshire  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Is one of the counties most affected by the industrial revolution. The county town has never dominated the shire. In pre‐Conquest days, it was overshadowed by Tamworth and Lichfield, in modern times ...
Marbled ware

Marbled ware   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
57 words

...ware . Pottery decoration resembling coloured marble or agate. The effect is achieved by twisting together clays of different colours, or by using a multi-coloured slip or by colouring the glaze with metallic oxides. The first of these methods originated in antiquity in Tang period ( ad 618–907 ) pottery (initially in Henan) and in republican...

Bendigo Pottery

Bendigo Pottery   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
127 words

... ( 1808–1909 ), in the Victoria town of Bendigo. The factory made household wares, including acid bottles, bricks, clay pipes, roof tiles, and tableware. During World War I it also made portrait jugs of military commanders, and in the 1930s it made agate-ware vases that were marketed as Waverly ware. The pottery is still active, but since 1971 has also been a tourist destination with an excellent museum built around the largest surviving collection of wood-fired kilns (5 bottle kilns, 3 circular kilns and 2 rectangular kilns). The walls are glazed...

Cameron, Charles

Cameron, Charles (1745–1812)   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Architecture (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2021
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
526 words

...of Tsarskoye Selo (now Pushkin ), near St Petersburg (1779–85), including the colonnaded Cameron Gallery, the Cold Baths, the Agate Pavilion , the private apartments, and the Church of St Sophia , where he demonstrated his skill as a designer of refined Neo-Classical interiors, among the most beautiful of their kind and date in Europe. His use of colour is especially felicitous: in the Agate Pavilion, for example, the red-agate columns with gilt-bronze capitals set against a background of green-jasper walls create a stunningly opulent effect. He designed...

Whieldon, Thomas

Whieldon, Thomas (1719)   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
238 words

...in a clear, lead glaze, called ‘Whieldon’ or ‘Tortoiseshell’ ware. The forms were sometimes modelled by such eminent contemporary blockcutters as Aaron Wood and Greatbatch. Whieldon's account and memorandum book for 1749–53 mentions ‘creamcolr’ and ‘Glazd Images’ (figures), while Wedgwood's experiment book of 1759 lists white, salt-glazed wares as ‘the principle article of our manufacture’ as well as ‘an imitation of tortoiseshell’. Production at Fenton Vivian also included solid agate wares, red and black stoneware, green-glazed creamwares in...

Staffordshire

Staffordshire   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Art Terms (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
190 words

...as ‘The Potteries’. The area had rich deposits of different types of clays, plentiful fuel in the form of coal and wood, and a system of waterways to transport products around England. It was here that many of the best known types of pottery were created, such as slipware , agate ware , creamware , pearlware , jasper , and salt-glazed stoneware . Porcelain was also made, briefly in the mid-18th century, and then from the 19th century. Many celebrated names in ceramics worked in the area, such as Thomas Toft , John Astbury , Thomas Whieldon , ...

Bread-Making Tools

Bread-Making Tools   Reference library

Linda Campbell Franklin

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...the Civil War. Although loaves were traditionally “cast” directly on the oven floor, cast-iron bread pans saw occasional use during the eighteenth century. Nineteenth-century cookstoves required bread pans, first manufactured in earthenware and tin. By the 1880s, enameled tin (agate ware, for example) had eliminated problems of breakage, rust, and cleaning (though not chipping); this was followed by twentieth-century improvements in aluminum and, later, Pyrex. The real change came when inventors in the third quarter of the nineteenth century patented tin and...

Casket

Casket   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
543 words
Illustration(s):
2

...at the front to reveal small drawers. They were commonly owned by the aristocracy and royalty (e.g. jewel casket of Mary II , c. 1690 ; London, V&A) and were frequently depicted in European painting of the period. In the 19th century English caskets were also produced in agate ware and contained animal figures on the lid in a manner typical of Romantic art. See also Cabinet and Reliquary...

Wedgwood

Wedgwood   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
2,232 words
Illustration(s):
2

...‘Frog’ service ( 1773–4 ), which comprised 952 pieces each hand-painted in enamels in ‘mulberry’ monochrome with a topographical scene of the English countryside based on contemporary engravings, and the frog emblem in green enamel. Queen's Ware could also be manufactured to imitate such hardstones as agate, porphyry, granite and Blue John . The effects were produced by three methods: by mixing or ‘wedging’ different stained clays; by dusting metallic oxides on to the surface; or by trailing or painting the surface with coloured slips. In 1767 ...

Japanning

Japanning   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
1,526 words

...with a well-worn brush. The raised work was usually painted with gold or silver pigments, although it may have been leaf gilded or silvered, and the details were accentuated with a colour that contrasted with or matched the background. Following burnishing with a dog’s tooth or agate, the decoration was coated with two or three coats of seed lac varnish. For polychrome work it was usual to use watercolour, sealed and prepared for polishing by the application of several coats of seed lac varnish. Such ground colours as red or black were mixed with seed lac...

Advertising Cookbooklets and Recipes

Advertising Cookbooklets and Recipes   Reference library

Andrew F. Smith

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...products, and these recipes were often reprinted in newspapers, magazines, and cookbooks. Among the early producers of advertising cookbooklets were manufacturers of cookery equipment. In the 1870s Granite Iron Ware distributed cookery booklets that encouraged the use of the company's pots and pans. Granite Iron Ware was followed by Agate Iron Ware, whose cookbooklets were particularly attractive. Other manufacturers followed, including makers of meat grinders, stoves, and electrical appliances, such as refrigerators, freezers, bread machines, and microwave...

Metalwork

Metalwork   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Islamic World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion, Social sciences, Regional and Area Studies
Length:
1,688 words
Illustration(s):
2

...chalcedony, topaz, hematite, red and green jasper, amethyst, rose-cut and square diamonds, amber, spinels, rubies, garnet, sapphire, coral, and agate (the most common), as well as seed and baroque pearls, blue and green glass, plaster beads, imitation stones, and enamel-backed jewelry. Many of these gemstones were used for seals, current until the mid-twentieth century, and talismans, but cornelian and agate predominated, as well as turquoise for talismans, which were also made in mother-of-pearl, quartz, metal, and jade. Bezels were made and mounted in...

Palestine

Palestine   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
1,156 words

...the Rock in Jerusalem, but also the folk arts and crafts traditionally practiced by Palestinians, such as pottery, jewelry and textiles. Ramallah ware is a thin-walled earthenware painted in red with simple geometric and plant designs. Palestinian folk jewelry includes bridal headdresses covered with coins, chokers, chains, bracelets and amulets, most of it made of silver, sometimes studded with coral, amber or agate. Textiles and embroidery have long played a major role in all walks of Palestinian life, from townsfolk and villagers to Bedouin. Dresses and...

Uluburun

Uluburun   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Archaeology, History
Length:
1,572 words
Illustration(s):
1

...the heads of rams or, in one case, a woman. Canaanite jewelry includes silver bracelets, or anklets, and gold pendants, one with a nude goddess in relief holding gazelles and another with a falcon grasping hooded cobras. A gold goblet is of uncertain origin. Assorted beads are of agate, gold, faience, glass, and Baltic amber. Other artifacts include two duck-shaped ivory cosmetics boxes with hinged-wing lids, copper caldrons and bowls, a trumpet carved from a hippopotamus tooth, and more tin vessels than had previously been found throughout the Bronze Age Near...

Cyprus

Cyprus   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Classical Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Classical studies
Length:
27,628 words
Illustration(s):
8

...Painted Wheelmade vessels show Syrian or Palestinian influences, and Black Lustrous Wheelmade ware has connections with Palestine and Egypt . 6. Late Bronze Age pottery from Cyprus, c. 1600– c. 1050 bc : (a) White Painted IV ware, h. 37 mm; (b) Bichrome Wheelmade ware, h. 51 mm; (c) Base Ring I ware, h. 36 mm; (d) White Slip I ware, h. 22 mm (all Stockholm, Medelhavsmuseum); (e) White Slip II ware, h. 28 mm (Larnaca, Archaeological Museum); (f) Base Ring II ware, h. 59 mm (Stockholm, Medelhavsmuseum) Dictionary of Art Around 1600 bc several new wares...

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