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acid shock

A sudden increase in the level of acidity of surface waters (lakes, streams, and rivers) in mid‐latitude areas, caused by the melting in spring of snow that has accumulated through the ...

acid shock

acid shock   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Environment and Conservation (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

... shock ( acid surge ) A sudden increase in the acidity of surface waters (lakes, streams, and rivers) in mid‐latitude areas, caused by the melting in spring of snow that has accumulated through the winter, and stored dry fallout of acid precipitation. An acid shock can cause significant damage to freshwater species and...

acid shock

acid shock  

A sudden increase in the level of acidity of surface waters (lakes, streams, and rivers) in mid‐latitude areas, caused by the melting in spring of snow that has accumulated through the winter, and ...
organic acids in geochemistry

organic acids in geochemistry  

Organic acids are integral to many geochemical processes in the atmosphere, soils, sea water, sedimentary basins, and hydrothermal systems. Atmospheric levels of carboxylic acids are generally not ...
toxic shock syndrome toxin-1

toxic shock syndrome toxin-1  

abbr.: TSST‐1; a protein (193 amino acids) secreted by certain strains of Staphylococcus aureus, that is responsible for the toxic shock syndrome. It is a potent inducer of interleukins 1 and 2 and ...
TNT

TNT  

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Overview Page
Explosive organic compound (C7H5N3O6) made from toluene by using sulphuric and nitric acids. Its resistance to shock (requiring a detonator to set it off) makes it one of the safest high ...
Alexander disease

Alexander disease  

Rare and usually fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the development of megalencephaly in infancy accompanied by progressive spasticity and dementia. The features are similar to those ...
origin of Life

origin of Life  

The process by which living organisms developed from inanimate matter, which is generally thought to have occurred on earth between 3500 and 4000 million years ago. It is supposed that the primordial ...
Neumann lines

Neumann lines  

A rectangular pattern of fine striations appearing when a slice of hexahedrite iron meteorite is cut, polished, and etched with dilute nitric acid; also called Neumann bands. The pattern is aligned ...
food, adverse reactions

food, adverse reactions  

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1 Food aversion, unpleasant reactions caused by emotional responses to certain foods rather than to the foods themselves, which are unlikely to occur in blind testing when the foods are disguised.2 ...
silicon(IV) oxide

silicon(IV) oxide  

A colourless or white vitreous solid, SiO2, insoluble in water and soluble (by reaction) in hydrofluoric acid and in strong alkali; m.p. 1713°C; b.p. 2230°C. The following forms occur naturally: ...
ubiquitin

ubiquitin  

A small protein (consisting of 76 amino acid residues), found universally in eukaryotes, that tags proteins destined for degradation by proteasomes or alters the protein's function, location, or ...
explosive

explosive  

A compound or mixture that, when ignited or detonated, undergoes a rapid violent chemical reaction that produces large amounts of gas and heat, accompanied by light, sound and a high-pressure shock ...
burn

burn  

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Overview Page
An injury caused by heat. First degree burns affect only the surface of the skin. Second degree burns damage the full thickness of the skin. Third degree burns cause damage to deeper tissues as well ...
aspirin

aspirin  

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Overview Page
The chemical has powerful anti-inflammatory properties that make it an effective agent to relieve pain and reduce fever. It also helps to inhibit blood clotting, so in small daily maintenance doses ...
nitric oxide

nitric oxide  

Reference type:
Overview Page
An important member of the group of gaseous mediators, which – together with amine mediators (e.g. adrenaline, noradrenaline, histamine, acetylcholine) and lipid mediators (e.g. prostaglandins) – ...
toxic shock syndrome toxin‐1

toxic shock syndrome toxin‐1   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
40 words

...shock syndrome toxin‐1 abbr. : TSST‐1; a protein (193 amino acids) secreted by certain strains of Staphylococcus aureus , that is responsible for the toxic shock syndrome . It is a potent inducer of interleukins 1 and 2 and tumour necrosis...

TNT

TNT   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
34 words

... ( 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene ) Explosive organic compound (C 7 H 5 N 3 O 6 ) made from toluene by using sulphuric and nitric acids. Its resistance to shock (requiring a detonator to set it off) makes it one of the safest high...

picric acid

picric acid   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Forensic Science

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Science and technology, Law
Length:
42 words

...acid A historically important compound in the chemistry of drugs, dyes, and explosives. Originally synthesized as a dye (it is yellow), it was found to be shock sensitive and explosive and is still used as a reference in explosive power...

buffer

buffer   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Construction, Surveying and Civil Engineering (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

...1. A shock absorber, e.g. a railway buffer. 2. A solution that resists changes in pH when a small quantity of acid or alkali is added to the solution. 3. A temporary data storage area on a computer, where data is held before being transmitted to an external device such as a...

organic acids in geochemistry

organic acids in geochemistry   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Earth

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

...complexes can account for a large percentage of some trace metals in rivers, groundwater, and sea water, but are typically of less importance in concentrated sedimentary-basin brines, even though the concentrations of carboxylic acids can approach 10 000 ppm. E. ...

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