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Acclimatisation societies

Were established in several Australian colonies in the mid-nineteenth century to colonise the indigenous Australian environment with exotic flora and fauna. Advocates of acclimatisation ...

acclimatization

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The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007

... A reversible physiological adaptation to environmental changes, e.g. a change of altitude or climate. See also altitude acclimatization , heat acclimatization...

acclimatization

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A Dictionary of Weather (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008

... The process by which animals (including humans) and plants adjust to changes in their environment. Such alterations may be the result of climatic change or arise from variations in the range of a particular...

acclimatization

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A Dictionary of Biology (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
43 words

...acclimatization The progressive adjustments in the biochemistry and physiology of an organism that occur in response to changes in its natural environment, for example seasonal changes in temperature or changes in oxygen concentration at different altitudes. See acclimation . Compare adaptation (sense 1 )...

acclimatization

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A Dictionary of Plant Sciences (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
65 words

... ( acclimation , hardening ) The changes involving the synthesis of proteins , membranes , and metabolites that occur in a plant in response to chilling or freezing temperatures, which protect tissues or confer tolerance to the cold. The term may also be applied to a range of physiological adjustments which occur in a plant when it is subjected to unusual environmental...

acclimatization

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A Dictionary of Zoology (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
62 words

... A reversible, adaptive response that enables animals to tolerate environmental change (e.g. seasonal climatic change) involving several factors (e.g. temperature and availability of food). The response is physiological, but may affect behaviour (e.g. when an animal responds physiologically to falling temperature in ways that make hibernation possible, and behaviourally by seeking a nesting site, nesting materials, and food). Compare acclimation ....

acclimatization

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A Dictionary of Sports Studies

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Social sciences, Society and culture
Length:
205 words

... Refers to the biological adaptations that take place in the body in response to extremes of pressure, heat, and cold. The body adapts acutely and chronically. The extent of the adaptation depends on the environmental factor involved and the level of exposure. An acute adaptation, for example, would be peripheral vasodilatation in response to a hot environment. The response is rapid, a matter of seconds or minutes, and the increased flow of blood close to the body surface allows an increased heat loss. An example of a chronic adaptation would be...

acclimatization

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A Dictionary of Animal Behaviour (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
63 words

... A form of reversible * adaptation by which an animal is able to alter its * tolerance of environmental factors. Under natural conditions acclimatization usually occurs in response to seasonal changes in climate. For example, temperature tolerance in fish is often directly correlated with monthly changes in their habitat temperature. Many fish also show temperature preferences that are related to their state of acclimatization...

acclimatization

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Food and Fitness: A Dictionary of Diet and Exercise (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

... Acclimatization is the reversible process by which a person becomes adapted to a change in the environment. It requires adaptations to a variety of factors (e.g. temperature, humidity, and atmospheric pressure). Acclimation, by contrast, involves an adaptation to a single factor (e.g. temperature). See also altitude and heat acclimatization...

acclimatization

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A Dictionary of Ecology (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... A reversible, adaptive response that enables animals or plants to tolerate environmental change (e.g. seasonal climatic change) involving several factors (e.g. temperature and availability of food). The response is physiological, but may affect behaviour (e.g. when an animal responds physiologically to falling temperature in ways that make hibernation possible, and behaviourally by seeking a nesting site, nesting materials, and food). Compare acclimation ( 1 )...

acclimatization

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A Dictionary of Public Health (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...acclimatization The process of physiological and psychological adjustment to unaccustomed climatic conditions that initially are perceived to be extreme: too hot, too cold, too humid. A similar process of adaptation to social and cultural conditions, acculturation , may occur also when individuals relocate in another country or locality. Either process can have adverse effects on health because of poor physiological adjustment to altogether different climatic conditions or exposure to pathogens to which there is no acquired immunity, or for other reasons. ...

Acclimatisation societies

Acclimatisation societies   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Australian History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
195 words

... societies were established in several Australian colonies in the mid-nineteenth century to colonise the indigenous Australian environment with exotic flora and fauna. Advocates of acclimatisation believed themselves deprived of ‘useful’ birds, animals and plants, and regarded the native flora and fauna as ugly. Accordingly, they sought to create an ‘improved’ natural environment—ideally, one that was comparable with ‘home’. By setting free introduced species—traditional targets for hunting, such as rabbits, deer and foxes, and ‘singing’ birds,...

cold acclimatization

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The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007

...acclimatization Physiological adaptations to repeated, prolonged exposure to low temperatures. Changes in peripheral circulation may keep exposed skin warm and improve cold tolerance, but cold acclimatization has not been thoroughly...

sludge acclimatization

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A Dictionary of Construction, Surveying and Civil Engineering (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

...acclimatization The preservation of sludge in specific environmental conditions, generally aerobic and/or anaerobic, where a substrate (organic food) is regularly provided to help microbes nurture and grow. The acclimatization can take one month in case of an aerobic environment and two to three months in an anaerobic...

heat acclimatization

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The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Science and technology, Medicine and health
Length:
155 words

...acclimatization Physiological adaptations associated with prolonged exposure to high environmental temperatures. The adaptations that improve heat tolerance include an increase in blood volume, increase in sweating rate with the sweat containing a lower concentration of sodium, decrease in heart rate and lowering of core temperature at a given work load, and a reduction in the perceived intensity of exercise. In addition, heat-acclimatized individuals tend to suffer less from nausea, dizziness, and discomfort in hot temperatures than those who are...

altitude acclimatization

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The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Science and technology, Medicine and health
Length:
184 words

...content and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate content increases with altitude. Acclimatization to avoid altitude sickness , generally takes 1–3 days at a given altitude. For example, if a person goes to 10,000 feet (3048 m) and spends several days at that altitude, their body acclimatizes to 10,000 feet (3048 m). If the person then climbs to 12,000 feet (3658 m), the body needs to acclimatize once again, taking another 1–3 days. For athletes preparing for competition at altitude, full acclimatization to medium altitudes (greater than 1829 m above sea level) may take...

heat acclimatization

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Food and Fitness: A Dictionary of Diet and Exercise (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

...acclimatization If you give your body sufficient time, it will gradually become adapted to living and working in a hot environment. The process by which you become physiologically more tolerant to high environmental temperatures is called heat acclimatization. During the process, resting pulse rate decreases, blood flow to the skin improves, and sweating increases. Sweat becomes more watery so that heat loss from the body can be maximized without losing too much salt. Heat-acclimatized individuals suffer less from nausea, dizziness, and discomfort in hot...

acclimatisation,

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Pocket Oxford German Dictionary: English German (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Bilingual Dictionary
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Bilingual dictionaries
Length:
5 words
acclimatization

acclimatization   Reference library

The New Oxford Dictionary for Scientific Writers and Editors (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009

... The adaptation of an organism to a change in its environment, especially its natural environment. Compare acclimation...

acclimatization

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Pocket Oxford Italian Dictionary: English-Italian (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Bilingual Dictionary
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Bilingual dictionaries
Length:
5 words
acclimatization

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Pocket Oxford German Dictionary: English German (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Bilingual Dictionary
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Bilingual dictionaries
Length:
8 words

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