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Overview

accent

Subject: Literature

The emphasis placed upon a syllable in pronunciation. The term is often used as a synonym for stress, although some theorists prefer to use ‘stress’ only for metrical accent. Three kinds ...

Accent

Accent   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

... Dart accent See under dart . Oxford accent See under oxford...

accent

accent   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... The emphasis placed upon a syllable in pronunciation. The term is often used as a synonym for stress , although some theorists prefer to use ‘stress’ only for metrical accent. Three kinds of accent may be distinguished, according to the factor that accounts for each: etymological accent (or ‘word accent’) is the emphasis normally given to a syllable according to the word’s derivation or morphology ; rhetorical accent (or ‘sense accent’) is allocated according to the relative importance of the word in the context of a sentence or question; metrical accent...

Accent

Accent   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to the English Language (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...Accent . 1. A way of speaking that indicates a person’s place of origin and/or social class: a working-class accent, a London accent, a working-class London accent ; a regional accent ; an American accent ; an American regional accent . In phonetic terms, an accent is a set of habits that make up someone’s pronunciation of a language or language variety. 2. In poetics and phonetics , the prominence of a syllable: in dogmatic , the accent (or stress) is on the second syllable, dogMAtic . 3. A diacritical mark, as over the first e in élite...

accent

accent   Reference library

A Dictionary of English Manuscript Terminology 1450–2000

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, History
Length:
90 words

... Accents in writing are marks (technically diacritical marks) qualifying certain letters to indicate particular meanings, sound values, or stresses on particular syllables. They are more common in continental languages such as French, Italian, Spanish, or German than in English: e.g., those in such words as été (acute accents), aperçu (cedilla), être (circumflex), omertà (grave accent), mañana (tilde), and über (umlaut). In early modern continental manuscripts the accents on letters are often omitted; in English manuscripts, especially when...

accent

accent (2)   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Linguistics (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Linguistics
Length:
47 words

... (2) A variety of speech differing phonetically from other varieties: thus, as in ordinary usage, ‘a Southern accent’, ‘Scottish accents’. Normally restricted by linguists to cases where the differences are at most in phonology: further differences, e.g. in syntax, are said to be between dialects...

accent

accent (1)   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Linguistics (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Linguistics
Length:
162 words

... (1) A phonological unit realized by prominence as perceived by a hearer, especially within a word. E.g. in morning the first syllable is perceived as more prominent than the second: in phonetic transcription, ['mɔːnɪŋ]. This distinguishes it as the accented syllable, or the one that ‘carries the accent’. Originally of pitch accents in Ancient Greek; thence of stress accents , e.g. in English; thence also applied to peaks of prominence in larger units, such as sentences. E.g. in He’ll talk to ′ me (‘to me, not someone else’), the ‘sentence accent...

Accent

Accent (1940–60)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to American Literature (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Literature
Length:
47 words

... ( 1940–60 ), eclectic “quarterly of new literature” published at the University of Illinois but not an official university organ. Contributors included Katherine Anne Porter , Kay Boyle , Kenneth Burke , Thomas Mann , Wallace Stevens , R.P. Blackmur , Irwin Shaw , and J.C. Ransom . A selection appeared in Accent Anthology ( 1946...

accent

accent   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Music (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Music
Length:
33 words

... 1. An emphasis on a particular note, giving a regular or irregular rhythmic pattern. For more detail, see rhythm . 2. The simplest forms of plainsong tones , i.e. very slightly inflected...

accent

accent   Reference library

Neal Peres Da Costa

The Oxford Companion to Music

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Music
Length:
234 words

...accent . 1 Emphasis given to a particular musical event by a sudden increase (or, occasionally, decrease) in volume (dynamic accent), a lengthening of duration (expressive lengthening), a slight anticipatory silence (articulation), or a combination of these. The dynamic accent is the most common type and may be indicated by any one of a number of signs or markings, for example >, –, fz , sf , sfz , fp , or the short slur. Expressive lengthening, which Hugo Riemann termed *‘agogic’ ( Musikalische Dynamik und Agogik , Leipzig, 1884 ), may also be...

accent

accent n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... n. 1. A characteristic pronunciation of a language, especially one associated with a geographical region or social group, to be distinguished from a dialect . 2. The stress ( 2 ) or prominence given to a spoken syllable, usually through a rise in pitch, loudness, or sound quality, or a written mark to indicate this. [From Latin ad to + cantus a...

accent

accent v.t.   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

... , v.t. ; accentuate . These synonyms have a good latent distinction. H.W. Fowler noted that accent is more common in literal senses, accentuate in figurative senses ( FMEU1 at 7). Hence one properly accents the second syllable of the word insurance , but accentuates the advantages of buying life insurance from a reputable...

Accent

Accent   Reference library

C. O. Hartman

The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies - poetry and poets
Length:
1,658 words
Illustration(s):
1

... . In Eng., accent is the auditory prominence perceived in one syllable as compared with others in its vicinity. Accent and stress are often treated as synonymous, though some literary scholars and linguists distinguish the two terms according to a variety of criteria. Disagreements persist about the source and acoustical nature of syllabic prominence—loudness, volume, pitch , duration , or some combination of factors—but they are arguably of peripheral relevance to the understanding of accent within Eng. poetics. The phenomena of accent vary among langs....

dynamic accent

dynamic accent   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Music

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Music
Length:
10 words

...dynamic accent . An *accent produced by an increase in...

morphological accent

morphological accent   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Linguistics (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Linguistics
Length:
23 words

...accent Word accent linked to an affix or determined by a morphological process: e.g that of devastátion as derived from dévastate...

false accent

false accent   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Music (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Music
Length:
17 words

...accent When the accent is removed from 1st beat of a bar to 2nd or...

Standard Accent

Standard Accent   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to the English Language (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...Standard Accent . An accent that is (taken to be) standard for a language or variety of a language: ‘The standard accent—the one that is regionless rather than regional—is the accent of a minority … and those who speak it are associated with high status, socially, politically and economically’ (J. K. Chambers, in In Search of the Standard in Canadian English , 1986 ). ...

tonic accent

tonic accent   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Music

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Music
Length:
27 words

...tonic accent . The effect of an *accent , produced not by emphasis but simply by a note falling on a higher pitch than those following or preceding...

accent-sensitive

accent-sensitive   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Computer Science (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

...-sensitive Requiring or making a distinction between accented and unaccented forms of a letter and between different accents. In any situation where a computer program is reading characters, a decision has to be made whether to treat each accented form of a letter as a different character. In most cases it is appropriate to do so; however, accents are often ignored in alphabetical sorting and in indexed searches. Modern database management systems generally offer extensive facilities to specify which data is accent-sensitive and which is...

pitch accent

pitch accent (1)   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Linguistics (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Linguistics
Length:
113 words

...accent (1) An accent ( 1 ) which is primarily realized by differences of pitch between accented and unaccented syllables. E.g. that of Ancient Greek, where, for instance, the accented syllable of ánthro:pos ‘human being’ was distinguished by a relatively high pitch; that of anthrô:pu: ‘of (a) human being’ by an initially high pitch which then fell. See stress for the contrasting term ‘stress accent’. See also tone ; tone language . In the strictest usage a tone language is one in which all syllables are distinguished equally: in languages...

recessive accent

recessive accent   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...accent A stress placed on the first syllable of a two-syllable word that is normally pronounced with the stress on its second syllable. This sometimes occurs in English verse when such a word is followed by a stressed syllable: for the sake of conformity to the metre , the stress is shifted to the initial position, as in John Donne’s line But éxtreme sense hath made them desperate The recessive accent is thus a specific type of ‘wrenched accent’ ( see accent...

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