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Overview

absolute address

A unique number that specifies a unique location within the address space where an operand is to be found/deposited, or where an instruction is located. It generally specifies a memory ...

absolute address

absolute address   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Mathematics (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

... address In spreadsheets a formula which is to appear in a number of cells may wish to use the contents of another cell or cells. Since the relative position of those cells will be different each time the formula appears in a new location, the spreadsheet syntax allows an absolute address to be specified, identifying the actual row and column for each cell. When a formula is copied and pasted to another cell, a cell reference using an absolute address will remain unchanged. A formula can contain a mixture of absolute and relative addresses...

absolute address

absolute address   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Computer Science (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

... address A unique number that specifies a unique location within the address space where an operand is to be found/deposited, or where an instruction is located. It generally specifies a memory location but in some cases specifies a machine register or an I/O device. In the case of a binary machine, it is an n -bit number specifying one of 2 n locations. The result of calculating an effective address is usually an absolute address...

absolute address

absolute address  

A unique number that specifies a unique location within the address space where an operand is to be found/deposited, or where an instruction is located. It generally specifies a memory location but ...
1 Writing Systems

1 Writing Systems   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
6,152 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
7

...will choose to emphasize the intelligence and inventiveness of human societies; the pessimist, who takes a more conservative view of history, will tend to assume that humans prefer to copy what already exists, as faithfully as they can, restricting their innovations to cases of absolute necessity. The latter is the favoured explanation for how the Greeks (at the beginning of the 1 st millennium bc ) borrowed the alphabet from the Phoenicians, adding in the process signs for the vowels not written in the Phoenician script ( see 3 ). There are many other...

War

War   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
4,919 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...the massive escalation of European war that occurred between the eighteenth and twentieth centuries. As descriptive categories ‘limited’ and ‘total’ war may serve well enough, but to conceptualize them is exceedingly difficult, if not impossible. One problem is that there is no absolute against which to measure ‘totality’. What is a ‘total’ threat to a society? What is ‘total’ mobilization? What is ‘total’ victory or defeat? Another problem is that war and preparation for war, modern war at least, is dynamic rather than stable, as states constantly seek to...

Family and Society

Family and Society   Quick reference

Ralph Houlbrooke

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
6,144 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

... surrender and regrant, surrender to the use of the will, and feoffment to uses eventually gave landholders at most levels some freedom to decide what should happen to their land after their deaths, while continuing to enjoy the income from it until then. This freedom was not absolute, however. Many men did not use it at all, and one of the main aims of those who did was to make better provision for younger sons and daughters than was otherwise possible. There has been a vigorous debate between historians who emphasize ‘individualism’ as reflected in a...

Novels

Novels   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
6,137 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...) and Robert Cadell 's ( 1788–1849 ) remarketings of Scott's Waverley novels. Meanwhile, the physical form of the novel moved towards a greater standardization, the dominance of the three-volume octavo work (commonly known as a ‘three-decker’ in the 1830s) becoming more absolute from the early 1820s. The demand for the novel was also affected by the expansion of that new concept, the ‘reading public’, estimated at 1,500,000 in 1780 and 7,000,000 in 1830 . The ways in which this public had access to novels affected their reception and construction....

Political Economy

Political Economy   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,138 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...market opportunities had replaced ‘servile dependency’. As a result, modern commercial society was increasingly characterized by a ‘gradual descent of fortunes’. In this respect it differed from both its feudal predecessor and the ancient slave economies by gradually reducing absolute, if not relative, inequalities of wealth and income. For reasons partly connected with the constitutional arrangements that resulted from the *Glorious Revolution of 1688 , England had so far been able to benefit most from these Europe-wide developments. On this more secure...

Central Government, Courts, and Taxation

Central Government, Courts, and Taxation   Quick reference

R. W. Hoyle

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
7,753 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...for instance in rentals , probate inventories , or account books; rather they were prepared, often by estimation, using criteria which applied for taxation purposes only. It is probably best to think of the sum assessed for taxation purposes—of whatever sort—as not an absolute statement of wealth, but a relative description, to be viewed in comparison with that of contemporaries. The majority of the surviving returns for the lay subsidies and the hearth taxes are in The National Archives, E 179. This is an artificial class containing a wide range of...

Class

Class   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
6,846 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...of persuasion and an emollient of relations between these social groups. Many developments were already leading in this direction: agrarian capitalists were organizing their production of crops for free movement and profitable sale in the market-place, statute law was enshrining absolute powers of ownership rather than differential use rights to property, and employers were imposing new work disciplines and redefining as theft what artisans regarded as customary perquisites of their trade. But the French Revolution and the fear of an English replay led the...

Sensibility

Sensibility   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
7,039 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...all the heart. That Ryves's heroine's response was a sexual one is confirmed by the hastily following qualification: ‘yet her reason was sufficiently strong to regulate not only her conduct, but her wishes; and though she felt the thrills of sensibility, she always preserved an absolute dominion over herself.’ Here we have an implementation of the code, usually termed ‘delicacy’, that was required to offset sensibility's dangers. Delicacy implied that, somehow, inhibition inhered in the female nervous system, a gendered expression of the ‘moral sense’. ...

2 The Sacred Book

2 The Sacred Book   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
9,978 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...utility. The Buddhist attitude towards scripture is grounded in its understanding of language, which it views as an impermanent human product. Since it is a basic Buddhist philosophical presupposition that everything within the world is impermanent, the impermanent and non-absolute nature of language means that it does not possess an enduring structure or metaphysical status. Lacking any intrinsic value, words are only valuable in an instrumental way. Thus, the value of words resides in their ability to accomplish something. During the formative period of...

48 The History of the Book in America

48 The History of the Book in America   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
12,975 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...commercial sector, university presses and other entities such as the New Press, which André Schiffrin founded in 1990 , uphold their mandate to bring new knowledge to the reading public. Even the disaffected former Random House editor Jason Epstein conceded in 2001 that, in absolute numbers (rather than as a percentage of total output), more ‘valuable’ books were being published than ever before. Yet these trends and the diversity they preserve do not counteract the disproportionate influence of the media giants on the choices available to American...

Punctuation

Punctuation   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
7,703 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...breakfast[,] I went for a walk.”/ “The sermon over [or being over ], the congregation filed out.”/ “Fellow priests[,] the clergy must unite in reforming the system of electing bishops.” Note, however, that no comma is needed within an absolute construction—e.g.: “The sermon [no comma] being over, we all left.” ( See absolute constructions .) Nor is a comma needed with restrictive expressions such as “my friend Professor Wright” or “my son John” (assuming that the writer has at least one other son— see appositives ). Eighth, in informal letters the comma...

augmented addressing

augmented addressing  

A method of expanding a short specified address by concatenating the specified address (as low-order address bits) with the contents of the augmented address register (as high-order bits) to produce ...
address mapping

address mapping  

Use of one of the addressing schemes to convert an address that is specified in an instruction into an absolute address. Virtual memory and cache memory use forms of address mapping for additional ...
direct addressing

direct addressing  

The “normal” mode of addressing in which the address specified in the instruction is the absolute address to be used. See also addressing schemes.
effective address

effective address  

An absolute address that is either a direct address or has been computed by one of the addressing schemes such as augmenting, relative addressing, or indexing.
address space

address space  

The total range of distinct locations that may be referred to with the absolute address. For most (i.e. binary) machines it is equal to 2n, where n is the number of bits in the absolute address. The ...
addressing schemes

addressing schemes  

The wide variety of schemes developed in order to provide compact or convenient address references in cases where the absolute address is too large to be accommodated in an instruction (see ...

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