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ablation

The removal or excision of a piece of tissue, usually by surgery. Surface ablation of the skin may be carried out by chemicals or laser.

ableism

ableism n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... n. Discrimination against people who are not able-bodied, or an assumption that it is necessary to cater only for able-bodied people. The term was coined by US feminists in the 1980s and was later used by the Council of the London Borough of Haringey in a press release in 1986 . Also spelt ablism . Compare ageism , ethnocentrism , fattism , heterosexism , racism , sexism , speciesism . ableist or ablist n. 1. One who practises or advocates ableism. adj. 2. Of or relating to ableism. [From able + Greek -ismos indicating a...

ableism

ableism   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Philosophy (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
117 words

... . Prejudice against people with disabilities, which can take many forms. It can take the form of a prejudice against using sign language with those who are deaf even when only a small percentage of them can master the alternatives of lipreading and speaking. It also shows itself as a prejudice against the use of Braille with the blind or visually impaired even when this makes them less efficient readers than they might be. In general, it is a prejudice against performing activities in ways that are better for disabled people. Prof. James P. Sterba See...

Ableism

Ableism   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Modern Phrase & Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

... . Discrimination in favour of able-bodied people or against the disabled (the latter also being termed ‘disablism’). The concept arose in the 1980s. See also Political correctness...

ableism

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Fowler’s Concise Dictionary of Modern English Usage (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... , meaning ‘discrimination in favour of the abled’ (i.e. against people with disabilities), is first recorded in the US from the early 1980s. There is a corresponding adjective and noun ableist : The cover design appears to be rather male-dominated, white, ableist — Rouge , 1990 . So far, the spelling with -le- is much more common, with little evidence for the less satisfactory spellings ablism and ablist . See -ism...

ableism

ableism   Reference library

Fowler’s Dictionary of Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...ableism , meaning ‘discrimination in favour of the abled’ (i.e. against people with disabilities), is first recorded in the US from the early 1980s. There is a corresponding adjective and noun ableist : The cover design appears to be rather male-dominated, white, ableist — Rouge , 1990 . Spelling both words with - ei - is preferable to the spellings ablism and ablist : at first glance they could make it look as if ab - sounds as it does in abdomen , and, presumably for that reason, are rather...

ableism

ableism noun   Quick reference

New Oxford American Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
30 words
ableism

ableism noun   Reference library

Australian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
14 words
ableism

ableism noun   Reference library

The New Zealand Oxford Dictionary

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
14 words
ableism

ableism noun   Quick reference

Oxford Dictionary of English (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
44 words
ableism

ableism  

Discrimination against people who are not able-bodied, or an assumption that it is necessary to cater only for able-bodied people. The term was coined by US feminists in the 1980s and was later used ...
-able

-able   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
777 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...upset purists: dependable ( depend-on-able ), indispensable ( in-dispense-with-able ), laughable ( laugh-at-able ), listenable ( listen-to-able ), reliable ( rely-on-able ), and unaccountable ( un-account-for-able ). They’re indispensable to the modern writer—not at all laughable. See reliable . D. Converting -ate Verbs into -able Adjectives. When -able is added to a transitive polysyllabic verb ending in the suffix -ate , that suffix is dropped. Hence accumulable , calculable , regulable , etc. ( See -atable .) Exceptions,...

ablation

ablation   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Dentistry (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Medicine and health, Dentistry
Length:
27 words

... n. The removal or excision of a piece of tissue, usually by surgery. Surface ablation of the skin may be carried out by chemicals or laser...

ablation

ablation   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Geography (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... Loss of snow and ice from a glacier by sublimation , melting, and evaporation; and from the calving of icebergs, and avalanches. In temperate and subpolar regions melting is the major form of ablation; in the Antarctic, it is calving. The rate of loss varies with air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, insolation, aspect, and the nature of the surface. In snowfields, ablation includes snow removed by the wind, and is affected by aspect, depth of snow, and the nature of the underlying surface. The ablation sub-system , where annual ablation...

ablation

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A Dictionary of Geology and Earth Sciences (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

... 1. Removal of snow and ice by melting and by direct alteration from the solid to the gaseous phase (sublimation). The rate of loss is controlled chiefly by air temperature, wind velocity, humidity , rainfall, and solar radiation . Ablation on snowfields is also influenced by aspect, depth of snow, and the nature of the underlying surface. Ablation till is the glacial debris that may be released. The ablation zone of a glacier is that area in which losses, including calving , exceed additions. 2. Removal of rock material, especially by wind...

ablation

ablation n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Nursing (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Medicine and health
Length:
56 words

...ablation [ăb- lay -shŏn] n. the removal or destruction of tissue or an abnormal growth by surgery, heat, hormones, or other drugs. radiofrequency a. the destruction of abnormal conducting tissue in the heart in patients with supraventricular tachycardia by the use of radiofrequency energy delivered via catheter under X-ray and electrocardiographic guidance. See also endometrial (ablation)...

ablation

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A Dictionary of Weather (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008

... The removal of surface snow or ice by sublimation , melting, or evaporation . The term is sometimes extended to include snow removed by the wind ( deflation ) and also the calving of glaciers...

ablation

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A Dictionary of Astronomy (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... The wearing away of the outer layers of a body by melting, erosion, vaporization, or some other process due to aerodynamic effects as the body moves at high speed through a planetary atmosphere. Ablation can affect natural bodies such as meteoroids, or artificial objects such as spacecraft. Ablation of a spacecraft’s protective heat shield prevents overheating of the spacecraft’s interior during atmospheric...

ablation

ablation n.   Quick reference

Concise Medical Dictionary (10 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Medicine and health, Clinical Medicine
Length:
152 words

...hormones, drugs, etc. For example, hormonal therapy is an alternative to surgery for the treatment of breast cancer when the patient is not fit for resectional surgery. In dentistry hard tissue can be removed by erbium laser ablation , with or without water spray. See also endometrial ablation ; radioiodine ablation...

ablation

ablation n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... n. Surgical removal of a structure or part of the brain or other organ of the body. ablate vb. [From Latin ab from + latum taken + -ion indicating an action, process, or...

ablation

ablation   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
52 words

... 1 (in surgery) the removal or destruction of tissue by a surgical procedure. 2 (in genetics) a technique for the removal of a tissue or a particular cell type during development. It depends on the tissue‐specific expression of a toxin gene such as diphtheria A ( dipA ) in a transgenic...

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