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abhaya-mudrā

Subject: Religion

(Skt., ‘fearlessness’ + mudra).

The gesture of being without fear (only acquired in full in the condition of mokṣa).

Abhaya-mudra

Abhaya-mudra   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Religion
Length:
20 words

...-mudra (Skt., ‘fearlessness’ + mudra ). The gesture of being without fear (only acquired in full in the condition of mokṣa...

abhaya-mudrā

abhaya-mudrā   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Hinduism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
42 words

...-mudrā (‘ gesture of fearlessness ’) In iconography a hand gesture ( mudrā ) in which the palm of a deity's or teacher's right hand is raised towards the devotee to inspire trust and dispel fear. Frequently represented on Hindu , Buddhist , and Jaina ...

abhaya-mudrā

abhaya-mudrā   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Buddhism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Religion
Length:
102 words
Illustration(s):
1

...-mudrā (Skt., gesture of fearlessness). Iconographic hand gesture ( mudrā ) whose purpose is to dispel fear and communicate protection, benevolence, and peace. Commonly found in representations of the Buddha and celestial Bodhisattvas, where the figure is usually depicted standing with the right arm bent, the palm raised and facing forwards, and the fingers joined. This gesture is rare among figures of lower status. There are many variations in which the left hand is also used, such as the double abhaya-mudrā found in south-east Asia, or in...

abhaya-mudrā

abhaya-mudrā  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(Skt., ‘fearlessness’ + mudra).The gesture of being without fear (only acquired in full in the condition of mokṣa).
ānandatāṇḍava

ānandatāṇḍava  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
From the 10th century ce, the standard sculptural representation in South Indian temples of Śiva Naṭarāja, the best-known example being at Cidambaram, where it represents Śiva wildly and ecstatically ...
mudrā

mudrā  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
Term denoting gesture in Hindu dancing. Béjart chose Mudra as the name for his school in Brussels.
Mudra

Mudra   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Religion
Length:
148 words

... (Skt., ‘seal’, ‘sign’). In both Hinduism and Buddhism, a sign of power, through the body, especially the hands. In Hinduism, the mudras of ritual worship ( pūjā ) are an outward and visible sign of spiritual reality which they bring into being. Thus mudras frequently appear in Hindu sculpture (as they do in Jain and Buddhist), especially dhyāna (meditation, hands linked in front of body with palms upward), abhaya, cf. abhaya-vacana (fear-repelling, hand lifted, palm outward), and varada (hand held out, palm upward, bestowing bounty). The añjali ...

mudrā

mudrā   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Buddhism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Religion
Length:
198 words
Illustration(s):
1

... (Skt. a seal) 1 A symbolic gesture of the hands or bodily posture communicating a specific meaning. From the earliest artistic representations onwards, Buddhas are always depicted with their hands in certain standard mudrās, the most important being the ‘wheel of the Dharma ’ ( dharma-cakra-mudrā ), the first finger and thumb of each hand forming a circle; the earth-touching mudrā ( bhūmi-sparśa-mudrā ), the right hand touching the earth calling it to witness the Buddha's enlightenment ( bodhi ); and the gesture of protection or fearlessness ( abhaya...

mudrā(s)

mudrā(s)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Hinduism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
153 words

...dance, and drama to indicate a particular characteristic or attitude assumed by a deity or character (e.g. the abhaya-mudrā ). 4 Parched grain; one of the ‘five Ms’ ( pañca-makāra ) used in Tantric ritual, and viewed as in some sense impure by Brahmanical religion, perhaps because of supposed aphrodisiac properties, or because it was typically offered by lower castes...

ānandatāṇḍava

ānandatāṇḍava   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Hinduism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
113 words
Illustration(s):
1

... of Śiva Naṭarāja , the best-known example being at Cidambaram , where it represents Śiva wildly and ecstatically dancing one world age ( yuga ) to destruction and ushering in the next. The figure is four-armed: the upper right hand holds a drum, the lower right makes the abhaya-mudrā , the upper left holds a flame, the lower left points to the god's raised left foot, beneath which the devotee may take refuge. With his right foot, Śiva is standing on the dwarf, Apasmāra , who symbolizes ignorance. The whole image is usually surrounded by a flaming...

Kālī

Kālī   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Hinduism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
358 words

...of skulls, and a skirt of severed arms; her distended tongue protrudes from her mouth, covered in the blood of sacrificial victims; in her four hands she usually holds various lethal weapons, and a severed human head; in some depictions she offers protection through the abhaya-mudrā . A well-known image of her absolute supremacy depicts her trampling on Śiva 's recumbent and passive body. In a variety of forms, Kālī's worship spread throughout India, although she continued to be, and remains, most popular in Bengal, where, since the mid 18th century the...

Viṣṇu

Viṣṇu   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Hinduism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
431 words

...kingly figure, wearing royal clothes and jewellery, and an elaborate, often cylindrical crown (kirīṭa). He carries a conch-shell (śaṅkha), a club ( gada ), a discus ( cakra ( 2 ) ) and a lotus ( padma ); alternatively, one hand may be raised in either the abhaya- or the varada - mudrās , another may rest on his hip. He wears the Brahmanical sacred thread (yajñopavīta), and, on his chest, a curl (sometimes a cruciform flower) called the śrīvatsa (‘beloved of Śrī ), as well as a jewel (kaustubha), obtained at the Churning of the Ocean. The...

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