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Overview

abduction

Subject: Law

N.

Wrongfully taking away or detaining another person, usually by force or fraud. See child abduction; false imprisonment; kidnapping.

abduction

abduction (1)   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Linguistics (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Linguistics
Length:
24 words

... (1) Movement away from a central line. The vocal cords are thus abducted when they are drawn apart. The opposite of...

abduction

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A Dictionary of Law (9 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Law
Length:
20 words

...abduction n. Wrongfully taking away or detaining another person, usually by force or fraud. See child abduction ; false imprisonment ; kidnapping...

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A Dictionary of Dentistry (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Medicine and health, Dentistry
Length:
20 words

...abduction n. Movement away from the midline ; e.g. the lateral rectus muscle is an abductor of the...

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A Dictionary of Zoology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
12 words

... Movement away from the midventral axis of the body. Compare adduction . ...

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The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
64 words

... Term introduced by Peirce for the process of using evidence to reach a wider conclusion, as in inference to the best explanation . Peirce described abduction as a creative process, but stressed that the results are subject to rational evaluation. However he anticipated later pessimism about the prospects of confirmation theory , denying that we can assess the results of abduction in terms of...

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A Dictionary of Media and Communication (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Media studies
Length:
57 words

... A form of logical inference involving the generation of a hypothesis that, if true, would be a plausible explanation for some otherwise unexplained phenomenon. Peirce argues that abduction is necessarily prior to both induction and deduction . In artificial intelligence , abduction is commonly employed in detecting faults in systems. See also heuristics . ...

Abduction

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The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

... The abduction motif in myth usually involves the malicious capture of a girl or young woman by an evil force or lustful deity or hero . In Greek mythology Persephone is abducted and raped by the underworld god Hades ; Helen of Troy is abducted by Paris , leading to the Trojan War; and Zeus in the form of a bull abducts Europa . Sita , the wife of the Vishnu avatar Rama , is abducted by the demon Ravana in the Indian epic the Ramayana . The hero Lemminkainen abducts Kylliki in the Finnish epic the Kalevala . A clue to a...

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A Dictionary of Computer Science (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

... An inference process widely used in artificial intelligence , particularly in expert systems and production rule system . In diagnosis, for example, there may be a rule like ‘if measles then red spots’ so that, when the symptom red spots occurs, we may use the rule in reverse to conclude that measles is present. However, unlike deduction , abduction is not logically sound because of inherent uncertainty that can lead to false conclusions—note that measles is not the only cause of red spots. Abduction is an example of a plausible reasoning ...

abduction

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Encyclopaedic Dictionary of International Law (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law, International Law
Length:
149 words

... The Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction of 25 October 1980 ( 1343 U.N.T.S. 97 ) does not define abduction but refers, instead, to the wrongful removal or retention of a child which occurs where such removal or retention is ‘in breach of rights of custody [actually exercised] attributed to a person, an institution or any other body, either jointly or alone, under the law of the State in which the child was habitually resident immediately before the removal or retention’: art. 3. The Convention seeks to promote...

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The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Science and technology, Medicine and health
Length:
35 words
Illustration(s):
1

... Movement of a body segment (e.g. arm or leg) away from the midline of the body. The term also refers to the movement of fingers or toes when they are spread apart. Compare adduction...

abduction

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The Oxford Companion to Irish History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
129 words

... of heiresses became a major concern during the 18th century. Although some such episodes were collusive, intended to circumvent parental opposition, most were genuine kidnappings, intended to force the victim into an immediate wedding ceremony or to compromise her so thoroughly that marriage to the perpetrator became her only option. Froude 's allegations that abduction was an ‘act of war’ by Catholics against the Protestant landed class were rejected by Lecky in a celebrated controversy. Modern accounts support Lecky in attributing abduction...

abduction

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Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
428 words

... All the Germanic laws condemned the abduction of young girls, widows and nuns . Certain laws imposed separation, or else the return of the woman to whoever held her mundium (power over the woman). The Salic law condemned the ravisher to payment of a fine of composition and banishment, without imposing the restitution of the girl. Finally it authorized the family to take revenge. The Church equally firmly condemned abduction, which violated paternal authority and sapped social order . Hence the punishment of the ravisher was excommunication ...

abduction

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The Oxford Companion to Philosophy (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
154 words

... . Abductive reasoning accepts a conclusion on the grounds that it explains the available evidence. The term was introduced by Charles Peirce to describe an inference pattern sometimes called ‘hypothesis’ or ‘ inference to the best explanation’. He used the example of arriving at a Turkish seaport and observing a man on horseback surrounded by horsemen holding a canopy over his head. He inferred that this was the governor of the province since he could think of no other figure who would be so greatly honoured. In his later work, Peirce used the word...

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A Dictionary of Law Enforcement (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Law
Length:
148 words

... 1 Wrongfully taking away or detaining another person, usually by force or fraud. See also child abduction ; false imprisonment ; kidnapping ; people trafficking . 2 (in international law ) The seizure of a person in one country for the purpose of taking him to another country for trial avoiding extradition procedures. It is a breach of international law including human rights . The injured state can take action against the seizing state. Countries vary in their attitude to receiving such prisoners. UK courts will not accept jurisdiction ...

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The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Linguistics (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Linguistics
Length:
206 words

... (2) Used variously of forms of reasoning in which conclusions are no more than probable. Thus especially of one by which, e.g. from ‘All dogs bark’ and ‘This animal barks’, the conclusion is drawn: ‘This animal is a dog’. Central, in one view, when people learn their native language. E.g. they may learn that if a noun has the ending - s it is plural: so, as one premiss, ‘All noun forms in - s are plural’. They may then want to use some noun in the plural. Call the form required f : so, as a second premiss, ‘ f is plural’. By abduction, the...

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A Dictionary of Ophthalmology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Medicine and health, Clinical Medicine, Surgery
Length:
11 words

...abduction Horizontal movement of the eye outwards (away from the nose)....

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A Dictionary of Social Research Methods

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Social sciences, Sociology
Length:
110 words

...abduction A logical method of deriving conclusions from a range of observations. The principle is that one chooses the most likely or simplest explanation for an observed phenomenon. Abduction is contrasted with deduction, in which prior theories are tested. In anthropology and cultural studies, abduction involves getting inside the phenomenon, studying it from within its own social and cultural scene, and hence is tied up with participant observation . Abduction is the process of reasoning during the interpretation of the participant experience, whereas...

abduction

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Australian Law Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Law
Length:
118 words

...abduction (Latin ab -, away + ducere , to lead) (1) Abductive reasoning, ‘inference to the best explanation’. Inferential reasoning that starts with a set of accepted facts and infers the best (most likely) explanation for them. Abduction moves from data describing what happened to the hypothesis that best explains the data. It is the kind of reasoning used in law when a barrister constructs a case theory and presents it to the court, through evidence , to explain allegedly criminal conduct and argue about its guilt status. The adversarial...

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A Dictionary of Public Health (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...abduction 1. Illegal removal of a child or other dependent person from the family or legally designated provider of care. 2. A method of reasoning that arrives at the most logical inference after considering all the available evidence, then decides which solution is the best fit. This is used in artificial intelligence and is the basis for evidence-based diagnosis. ...

arm abduction

arm abduction   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007

...abduction Movement of the arm away from the midline of the...

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