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abaft

Towards the stern of a ship, relative to some other object or position. Abaft the beam is any bearing or direction between the beam of a ship and its stern. See also aft; but ‘abaft’ is ...

abaft

abaft   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Travel and Tourism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Social sciences
Length:
10 words

... At the back end or stern of a...

abaft

abaft adv.   Reference library

The Oxford Essential Dictionary of the U.S. Military

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

... adv. in or behind the stern of a ship. prep. nearer the stern than; behind: the yacht has a shower just abaft the...

abaft

abaft   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
52 words

... , towards the stern of a ship, relative to some other object or position. Abaft the beam is any bearing or direction between the beam of a ship and its stern. See also aft ; but ‘abaft’ is always relative, e.g. abaft the mainmast (opposite to ‘before’); ‘aft’ is general (opposite to...

abaft

abaft   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
21 words

... (esp. naut.) in or to the rear (of). XIII. ME. o(n) baft , i.e. ON , A- 1 and baft , OE. beæftan ...

abaft

abaft   Quick reference

New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
134 words

... • Taft • abaft , aft, craft, daft, draft, draught, engraft, graft, haft, kraft, raft, shaft, understaffed, unstaffed, waft • backdraft • handcraft • aircraft • stagecraft • spacecraft • statecraft • needlecraft • priestcraft • witchcraft • kingcraft • handicraft • woodcraft • Wollstonecraft • bushcraft • watercraft • hovercraft • crankshaft • camshaft • layshaft • driveshaft • turboshaft • countershaft • bereft , cleft, deft, eft, heft, klepht, left, reft, theft, weft • adrift , drift, gift, grift, lift, rift, shift, shrift, sift, squiffed,...

abaft

abaft   Quick reference

Oxford Dictionary of English (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
75 words
abaft

abaft   Quick reference

New Oxford American Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
63 words
abaft

abaft   Reference library

Australian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
36 words
abaft

abaft   Reference library

The Canadian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
37 words
abaft

abaft   Reference library

The New Zealand Oxford Dictionary

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
39 words
abaft

abaft  

Towards the stern of a ship, relative to some other object or position. Abaft the beam is any bearing or direction between the beam of a ship and its stern. See also aft; but ‘abaft’ is always ...
abaft the wheel-house

abaft the wheel-house phr.   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
110 words

... the wheel-house phr. [naval imagery, abaft , behind, towards the stern] 1 ( US ) just below the small of the back; thus a euph. for the buttocks. a. 1909 in J. Ware Passing Eng. of the Victorian Era 262/2: The next instant a huge bull charged out of the door, and, catching the hero of Valley Forge abaft the wheelhouse, incontinently slammed him into a big apple tree. 2 ( also aft to the wheel-house ) crazy. 1902 Ade Girl Proposition 109: She sprang a new Series of Curves on him every Week or two. Sometimes he suspected that she had gone...

manger

manger  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
A small space in the bows of a ship immediately abaft the hawsepipes and bounded on the after side by a low coaming called a manger-board. Its purpose was to prevent any water from running aft along ...
bridle-port

bridle-port  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
A square port cut in the bows on either side of the stem of wooden ships on main deck level through which mooring bridles were led. The same ports were used in sailing warships for guns, moved up ...
running free

running free  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
The situation of a sailing vessel when the wind is either well abaft the beam and within a point or two of blowing from directly astern or blows directly from that direction. The term comes from the ...
overtaking light

overtaking light  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
A white light displayed at the stern of a vessel under way at night, forming part of the compulsory navigation lights which a ship must display under the regulations laid down by the International ...
points of sailing

points of sailing  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
The headings of a sailing vessel in relation to the wind. When a vessel is sailing as near to the wind as it can, it is said to be close hauled, i.e. with its sails sheeted (hardened) well in and ...
aft

aft  

At or towards the stern or after part of a ship, as a word describing either position or motion. A gun may be mounted aft (an expression of position), and seamen sent aft to man it (an expression of ...
flowing

flowing  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
1 The situation of the sheets of a sail in a fore-and-aft-rigged sailing vessel when they are eased off as the wind comes from broad on or abaft the beam, and the yards of a square-rigged ship when ...
snow

snow  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
A two-masted merchant vessel of the 16th–19th centuries, the largest two-masted ship of its period with a tonnage of up to 1,000 tons or so. It was rigged as a brig, with square sails on both masts. ...

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