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Yogacara

Subject: Religion

A Buddhist school arising in the 3rd to 4th centuries, that denies the existence of any reality independent of consciousness. Like Berkeley the school acknowledges a supreme consciousness, ...

Yogācāra

Yogācāra   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Buddhism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Religion
Length:
914 words

...Through a neglect of research based on the authentic Yogācāra texts combined with the distortions found in east Asian and Tibetan secondary literature, itself largely based on late Yogācāra trends, it was common to see Yogācāra as a Buddhist form of idealism but this understanding is gradually being revealed as misleading and inadequate by a new generation of scholars who suggest that early Yogācāra is actually an epistemological rather than ontological system. As its name suggests, the central Yogācāra doctrines and theories derive particularly from...

Yogācāra

Yogācāra (T.)   Reference library

The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

.... Vasubandhu’s most famous Yogācāra works are the Viṃśatikā and the Triṃśikā (his most famous work of all, the Abhidharmakośabhāṣya , is said to have been composed prior to his conversion to the Mahāyāna). Among the “five books of Maitreya ” ( see Byams chos sde lnga ), three are particularly significant in Yogācāra: the Madhyāntavibhāga , the Dharmadharmatāvibhāga , and the Mahāyānasūtrālaṃkāra . Important contributions to Yogācāra thought were also made by the logicians Dignāga and Dharmakīrti . Although Yogācāra and Madhyamaka engaged in...

Yogacara

Yogacara   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Philosophy (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
75 words

... A Buddhist school arising in the 3rd to 4th centuries, that denies the existence of any reality independent of consciousness. Like Berkeley the school acknowledges a supreme consciousness, or vijnana , and is also designated the Vijnanavada or Vijnana school. The supreme consciousness serves as a kind of storehouse for perceptions. By a process of meditation we can come to awareness of the truth, and eliminate the illusory distinction between subject and...

Yogācāra-Svātantrika-Madhyamaka

Yogācāra-Svātantrika-Madhyamaka (T.)   Reference library

The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

...Yogācāra-Svātantrika-Madhyamaka . ( T. Rnal ’byor spyod pa’i dbu ma rang rgyud pa ). According to Tibetan exegetes, who coined the term, one of the two branches of the Svātantrika school of Madhyamaka , together with the Sautrāntika-Svātantrika-Madhyamaka . Its main proponents include Śāntarakṣita and Kamalaśīla . Like Yogācāra , the school holds that external objects do not exist and that objects are of the nature of consciousness. Like Madhyamaka , the school holds that consciousness is empty of true existence. In its presentation of the three...

Yogacara

Yogacara  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
A Buddhist school arising in the 3rd to 4th centuries, that denies the existence of any reality independent of consciousness. Like Berkeley the school acknowledges a supreme consciousness, or ...
vijñapti

vijñapti  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(Skt.). Representation; a Yogācāra term which denotes the mentally generated projections of subject and object that are falsely believed to exist. In reality, according to Yogācāra teachings, they ...
pariniṣpanna

pariniṣpanna  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(Skt.). In Yogācāra philosophy, the level of ultimate truth or perfection, the highest of the three levels of truth recognized by the school. This is the condition of the storehouse consciousness ...
Paramārtha

Paramārtha  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(499–569).Also known by his Chinese name, Chen-ti, he was an Indian scholar-monk from the Avanti region of western India. He arrived in China by sea in 546 ce and took up residence in Chien-K'ang at ...
amala-vijñāna

amala-vijñāna  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(Skt.). The ‘unsullied consciousness’, a term used in Paramārtha's system of Yogācāra and equivalent in many repects to Buddha-nature or the tathāgata-garbha.
āśraya-parāvṛtti

āśraya-parāvṛtti  

Reference type:
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Subject:
Religion
(Skt.). ‘The manifestation of the basis’, a term used in Yogācāra works to describe the manifestation of inherent Buddha-nature once the mind has been cleared of adventitious impurities ...
mano-jalpa

mano-jalpa  

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Subject:
Religion
(Skt., mental chatter). A term especially used in Yogācāra to denote the process of mental designation that precedes verbal designation. Used synonymously with vikalpa or vicāra.
nirvikalpa

nirvikalpa  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(Skt.). The absence of the false dualistic division that is, according to Yogācāra.imposed upon reality, involving a belief in the existence of a perceiving subject and perceived objects (see also ...
nirvikalpa-jñāna

nirvikalpa-jñāna  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(Skt.). The awareness associated with enlightenment (bodhi) which is free from the overlay of dualistic concepts (vikalpa) found in ordinary unenlightened beings. This term is associated with, but ...
parikalpita

parikalpita  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(Skt.). The ‘imagined’, one of the three natures (tri-svabhāva) according to Yogācāra philosophy. It denotes the unreal (parikalpita) duality of a perceiving subject and perceived objects that has ...
Dharmapāla

Dharmapāla  

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Subject:
Religion
One of the leading exponents of the Yogācāra school in India.a contemporary of Bhāvaviveka, active during the early decades of the 7th century ce and dying young at the age of 32. Eventually based at ...
Mahāyāna-saṃgraha

Mahāyāna-saṃgraha  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
‘The Mahāyāna Compendium’, a key work of the Yogācāra school in eleven chapters attributed to Asaṇga. It introduces various Yogācāra concepts such as the storehouse consciousness (ālaya-vijñāna), the ...
Tri-svabhāva-nirdeśa

Tri-svabhāva-nirdeśa  

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Subject:
Religion
‘The Treatise on the Three Natures’, a key Yogācāra work in 38 verses by Vasubandhu, thought by some to have been his last work. It covers similar ground to his Triṃśikā but deals with his ...
Śīlabhadra

Śīlabhadra  

Reference type:
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Subject:
Religion
(529–645 ce).A renowned Indian master of the Yogācāra school, originally from Magadha. He was later based at Nālandā where he became the intellectual successor of Dharmapāla and his interpretation of ...
Asaṇga

Asaṇga  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
Along with Maitreyanātha, the historical co-founder of the Yogācāra school of Mahāyāna Buddhism and half-brother of Vasubandhu. Born in north-west India during the 4th century ce, he was originally a ...
three turnings of the wheel

three turnings of the wheel  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(Skt., tri-dharma-cakra-pravartana).1 Notion arising from the Buddha's first sermon where each of the Four Noble Truths is viewed from three perspectives: as a noble truth, as a truth to be realized, ...

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