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Yew Sunday

Subject: Religion

A medieval name for Palm Sunday, so called because branches of yew were carried in the liturgical procession.

Yew Sunday

Yew Sunday   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 rev. ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
21 words

...Yew Sunday . A medieval name for Palm Sunday , so called because branches of yew were carried in the liturgical...

Yew Sunday

Yew Sunday  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
A medieval name for Palm Sunday, so called because branches of yew were carried in the liturgical procession.
Painswick Feast and Church Clipping

Painswick Feast and Church Clipping  

Reference type:
Overview Page
This Gloucestershire town is noted for several traditions, which cluster around the old Feast day. The church is dedicated to the Virgin Mary, and on the first Sunday after her Nativity on 19 ...
Palm Sunday

Palm Sunday   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
65 words

...Sunday The commemoration of Christ’s triumphal entry into *Jerusalem . The *liturgy featured the blessing of palm, yew, or willow branches, which were then carried in *procession before *Mass . Elizabeth C. Teviotdale J. M. Pierce , ‘Holy Week and Easter in the Middle Ages’, in Passover and Easter: Origin and History to Modern Times , ed. P. F. Bradshaw and L. A. Hoffman (1999),...

Palm Sunday

Palm Sunday   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

...Sunday . In the late Middle Ages, this was one of the most vivid festivals of the year. Before Mass, the priests blessed ‘palms’ (twigs of sallow, box or yew) which the congregation carried in procession and later took home. During Mass people made crosses, either from their ‘palms’ or from sticks and string they had brought to the church; these too were blessed, and taken home to ward off evil ( Duffy , 1992 : 23–7). Echoes remained in the secular folk custom of ‘going a-palming’, common from the 18th century until the mid-19th century. Groups of young...

‘PALM’. protects

‘PALM’. protects   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Superstitions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Society and culture, Customs and Traditions
Length:
419 words

...box and yew, were solemnly blessed and some of the branches burnt to ashes, and used by the priests on the Ash-Wednesday in the following year; while other boughs … were distributed among the pious, who bore them about in … processions … The youth in many places yet preserve some vestiges of the custom of the day and gather willow flowers or buds, or such others as happen to be in a forward state of vegetation. 1858 DENHAM North of England ( 1895 , 57) Palm Crosses … are still often seen in the hands of children … on Palm Sunday. The remaining...

Painswick Feast and Church Clipping

Painswick Feast and Church Clipping   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

...that the bun and/or payment is a remnant of a scrambling custom , previously carried out at the vicarage, but this is guesswork. The word ‘clipping’ means ‘embracing’, but at Painswick it has been confused with the physical clipping of the 99 yew trees in the churchyard. It used to be believed that only 99 yews would grow in the churchyard, and that all attempts at planting more would be unsuccessful. The other tradition for which Painswick is known is the baking of Puppy-Dog Pies. Writers differ quite sharply in describing these delicacies and it is as...

Palm

Palm   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...hand The inner area of the hand, between the wrist and the fingers. To have someone in the palm of one’s hand is to have them at one’s mercy or command. Palm Sunday The Sunday preceding easter , so called in memory of Christ’s triumphant entry into jerusalem , when the multitude strewed the way with palm fronds ( John 12:12–19 ). In medieval England ‘palms’ were often made from willow, box and yew. Palmistry Palmy days Prosperous or happy days, as those were to a victorious gladiator when he went to receive the palm branch as the reward of his prowess....

Versailles, Château de

Versailles, Château de   Reference library

Patrick Taylor

The Oxford Companion to the Garden

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Society and culture, Lifestyle, Home, and garden, Art & Architecture
Length:
2,982 words
Illustration(s):
2

...that has not changed is the problematic water supply—the fountains flow only on Sundays. The garden is still rich in marvellous works of art, constituting the finest collection of garden ornaments in the world. The broad layout—the chief parterres, the Grand Canal, the Bassin de Latone, the Bassin d'Apollon, the orangery with its garden, and some of the bosquets are still in place. The overwhelming change is that much intricacy of detail has been lost. Some elaborate yew topiary (of which 17th-century drawings survive) has been reinstated to line the walk...

poetry

poetry   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Hardy

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
5,197 words

...for the living, as in the marvellous poem ‘Lying Awake’, which metamorphoses subjective selves into objective tombstones: You, Meadow, are white with your counterpane cover of dew,  I see it as if I were there; You, Churchyard, are lightening faint from the shade of the yew,  The names creeping out everywhere. The articulations of these patterns, enclosing the mind and the life in obsolete forms stretching out from the past, is rendered in ‘The Prospect’, one of a series of poems where Hardy explores the patterns of pattern: here, inner patterns of...

London

London   Reference library

The Oxford Guide to Literary Britain & Ireland (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature, Society and culture
Length:
76,697 words

... Milton , for Young's Night Thoughts , and Blair's The Grave . The novelist Simon Raven was born in 1927 at 27 Welbeck Street . Mitcham, district to the S. John Donne lived ( 1606–10 ) in a two‐storey house (gone) in Whitford Lane , with overhanging gables and a row of yews in the garden. His letters from his ‘hospital’ and sometimes his ‘prison’ show his anxiety at his lack of a place at court to provide for his increasing family, and his reluctance to accept the only alternative, ordination. Pseudo‐Martyr ( 1610 ), Biathanatos (written 1607–8...

precipitous

precipitous   Reference library

Fowler’s Dictionary of Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
642 words

..., precipitate . 1 The classic distinction. ( a ) precipitous . The core, literal meaning of precipitous is ‘sheer like a precipice; dangerously high or steep’, e.g. a half-buried beck where you can scramble past still pools…along precipitous ledges lined with wild yew trees—National Trust Mag ., 1992 . Derived from this is a metaphor to describe a change for the worse in a situation or condition, i.e. meaning ‘dramatic’. This meaning is often invoked by words such as decline, drop , and plunge , e.g. A number of factors might be responsible...

dago

dago adj. 1   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
1,029 words

...now [DA]. 1936 (con. 1920s) Dos Passos Big Money in USA ( 1966 ) 781: All we've got's this dago wine. 1942 N. Algren Never Come Morning ( 1988 ) 17: We drove you that time we fought the dago kid. 1967 L. Bruce Essential Lenny Bruce 67: Billi wants to know if yew can get him a deal on one o them Dago spawts cahs. 1976 P. Theroux Family Arsenal 74: Their idleness made this noble place a dago plaza. 1982 (con. 1970 ) J.M. Del Vecchio 13th Valley ( 1983 ) 477: I've got Dago blood in me. The oil keeps me up. 1990 S. Morgan ...

bent

bent adj.   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
1,824 words

...a thrill. 6 impoverished, penniless. 1960, 1975 Wentworth & Flexner DAS . 7 ( orig. US ) eccentric, acting oddly, behaving in a strange manner. 1964 Current Sl. ( 1967 ) I:4 3/2: Bent , adj. Uninhibited, mad, or insane. 1979 Lette & Carey Puberty Blues 118: Yews chicks are bent […] fuckin' bent. 1987 C. Hiaasen Double Whammy ( 1990 ) 158: [He] had skinned him like a mackerel and tried to sell the fillets […] It was one of those cases so bent as to be threatened by the sheer weight of law-enforcement bureacracy. 1997 E. Little ...

tail

tail n.   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
7,288 words

...1953 L. Uris Battle Cry ( 1964 ) 56: Put on your old red bustle / Get your tail out and hustle. 1960 C. Cooper Jr Syndicate ( 1998 ) 78: That crazy rat'll go after the tail before he eats! 1970 J. Conaway Big Easy 159: We don't care if yew want to knock off a little black tail, Dude – git yew a little poontang. 1980 E. Folb Runnin' Down Some Lines 150: Many of the same expressions are used for females […] and for the female genitalia ( pussy, cock, tail ), and for the act of sexual intercourse (to get some pussy/cock/tail ). 1998 J....

arse

arse n.   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
12,630 words

...in Chi! 1979 J. Morrow Confessions of Proinsias O'Toole 47: ‘Ah yer arse,’ I said colloquially; ‘don't believe everything you read.’ 1985 (con. 1968 ) D.A. Dye Citadel ( 1989 ) 66: Yer dyin' ass. 2001 N. Griffiths Sheepshagger 98: — Fuck off. Jealous. — Of yew ? Yewer arse. your face and my arse! see your face and my ass ! under face ...

Bibliography, Selected

Bibliography, Selected   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
54,714 words

... (New York/London 1979) Sullivan, John Only Fools and Horses [TV scripts] (London 1981–86) Sullivan, Joseph M. Criminal Slang (Chicago 1908) The Sun (London 1964– ) Sunday Express (London 1918– ) Sunday Independent (Johannesburg 1995– ) Sunday Mirror (London 1963– ) Sunday Telegraph (London 1961– ) Sunday Times (London 1822– ) Sunday Times (Johannesburg 1906– ) Sunday Tribune (Dublin 1980– ) Sun-Herald (Sydney 1953– ) Surr, Thomas Skinner Winter in London (London 1806) Surtees, Robert S. Ask Mamma (London 1858) —— Handley Cross ...

ass

ass n.   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
14,967 words

...1979 ) 160: If I'd followed him to the letter I'd have been out on my arse in no time. 1982 A. Maupin Further Tales of the City ( 1984 ) 188: She'd better report to me on Friday or she's out on her ass. 2000 N. Griffiths Grits 100: If it wuz me, now, ad av yer out on yewer fuckin arse arftyer a week, no, a fuckin dey . out the ass ( US ) excessively. 1987 Eble Campus Sl. Fall 6: out the ass – in large quantities: I have mid-terms out the ass this week. Also up the shit, out the butt, up the bazooka. 1999 Eble Campus Sl. Apr. 5: out the...

hell

hell n.   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
21,336 words

...eyes o' his'n are allus looking arter Simpson when he's dealing, as if he was doin' suthin' he'd no business to, and was afraid of catching hell for it. 1918 G. Bowerman diary 13 Sept. in Carnes Compensations of War ( 1983 ) 19: If you men had done this ten weeks later yewed have caught H-E-double L! 1929 W.R. Burnett Little Caesar ( 1932 ) 199: The prosecutor's in there now and you're gonna ketch hell. 1930 R. Whitfield Green Ice ( 1988 ) 167: I'll catch hell […] If the chief didn't tell you it was all right. 1945 R. Westerby Mad in...

Trees

Trees   Reference library

Oliver RACKHAM

Berkshire Encyclopedia of World History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
History
Length:
3,726 words

...like laurel in the triumphs of ancient Rome, holly at Christmas, and palms (or some northern substitute for palms) on the Christian Palm Sunday. Monotheistic religions celebrate specific sacred trees, at least unofficially. Jews, Muslims, and Christians venerated “Abraham’s Oak,” at Hebron in Palestine. England has its ancient churchyard yews, some dating from the early centuries of Christianity. In Wales, ancient yews are associated with the saintly hermits of the first millennium ce . Trees in parks and gardens—other than fruit trees—are a feature of many...

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