You are looking at 1-5 of 5 entries  for:

  • Early Modern History (1500 to 1700) x
clear all

View:

Sistine Chapel

Sistine Chapel  

The principal chapel of the Vatican Palace, so called because it was built for Sixtus IV (1471–84).
Faber, Johann

Faber, Johann   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Renaissance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early Modern History (1500 to 1700)
Length:
227 words

...and (from 26 July 1509 ) Freiburg im Breisgau. After taking his doctorate he became vicar of Lindau and Leutkirch, and was then appointed canon of Basel. In 1518 he became vicar-general of the bishop of Constance and papal protonotary of Pope Leo X . He was sympathetic to the call for reform, and in 1519–20 corresponded with Zwingli ; he was also willing to defend Luther against Eck , though he never adopted Lutheran views. In the autumn of 1521 Faber travelled to Rome, and by the conclusion of his visit he had become an opponent of...

Medici, Lorenzo de', Il Magnifico

Medici, Lorenzo de', Il Magnifico   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Renaissance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early Modern History (1500 to 1700)
Length:
375 words

... and Pulci ). His own writings include popular poetry, a play, and a treatise on falconry ( Caccia del falcone ). Lorenzo's six children by Clarice Orsini ( d. 1488 ) included three sons: Piero II de'Medici (who succeeded his father), Giovanni de'Medici (who became Pope Leo X ), and Giuliano de'Medici (later duke of Nemours). Lorenzo's namesakes include his grandson Lorenzo ( 1492–1519 ), duke of Urbino, his great-uncle Lorenzo ( 1395–1440 ), the brother of Cosimo il Vecchio , and his great-uncle's grandson Lorenzo ( d. 1503 ). Lettere , ed. ...

sumptuary laws

sumptuary laws   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Renaissance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early Modern History (1500 to 1700)
Length:
596 words

...in twelfth-century France and Italy; in the thirteenth century sumptuary laws were promulgated in Spain, in the fourteenth century in England and Switzerland, and in the fifteenth century in Germany and Scotland. At first such laws emanated from the Church: in 1274 Gregory X banned excessive ornamentation in clothing, and in 1279 the papal legate in Genoa regulated women's clothing. The Church retained an interest in sumptuary legislation relating to matters such as travel on Sundays, but by the fourteenth century most such legislation was...

Paul IV

Paul IV   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Renaissance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early Modern History (1500 to 1700)
Length:
959 words

...Hebrew) in the Roman household of his uncle Cardinal Oliviero Carafa , to whom he owed his subsequent ecclesiastical preferment. Giampietro was appointed bishop of Chieti (or ‘Theate’) in 1505 and served as the legate of Pope Leo X to King Henry VIII of England in 1513–14 . He was papal nuncio in Flanders and Spain 1515–20 , and in 1518 he was appointed archbishop of Brindisi. By this time Giampietro's most prominent characteristics were personal asceticism, a taste for humanist scholarship (he was one of Erasmus ' many correspondents), and a...

View: