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William Cranch Bond

(1789–1859) Americanastronomer, father of G. P. Bond. He founded the Harvard College Observatory, originally sited in his house but transferred to Harvard in 1838. He was ...

Bond, William Cranch

Bond, William Cranch (1789–1859)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Astronomy (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

..., William Cranch ( 1789–1859 ) American astronomer , father of G. P. Bond . He founded the Harvard College Observatory, originally sited in his house but transferred to Harvard in 1838 . He was succeeded as its director by his son. The Bonds frequently worked together, discovering Saturn’s satellite Hyperion in 1848 , and Saturn’s ‘crêpe ring’ (the C Ring) in 1850 . They also collaborated in the development of...

William Cranch Bond

William Cranch Bond  

(1789–1859)Americanastronomer, father of G. P. Bond. He founded the Harvard College Observatory, originally sited in his house but transferred to Harvard in 1838. He was succeeded as its director by ...
George Phillips Bond

George Phillips Bond  

(1825–65)Americanastronomer, son of W. C. Bond. He worked closely with his father in studies of the Solar System and in developing astrophotography. In 1850 they took the first good photographs of ...
William Lassell

William Lassell  

(1799–1880) British astronomerLassell, who was born at Bolton in Lancashire, was a brewer by profession who became interested in astronomy. He built an observatory for himself at Starfield near ...
Cannon, Annie Jump

Cannon, Annie Jump   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Scientists

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Science and technology
Length:
382 words

... Edward Pickering , to employ young well-educated women to do calculations. She worked there for the rest of her career, serving from 1911 to 1932 as curator of astronomical photographs. In 1938 , after nearly half a century of distinguished service, she was appointed William Cranch Bond Astronomer. One of the main programs of the observatory was the preparation of the Henry Draper Catalogue of a quarter of a million stellar spectra. Stars were originally to be classified into one of the 17 spectral types, A to Q, which were ordered alphabetically in...

observatory

observatory   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the History of Modern Science

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Subject:
Science and technology, History of Science
Length:
1,847 words

...in the face of congressional disapproval. President John Quincy Adams in his message to Congress of 1825 had lamented that Europe had 130 “light-houses of the skies” and America none. Soon the United States had observatories too, mostly in colleges. Harvard lured William Cranch Bond away from his private observatory to work for no salary and supply his own instruments. They pointed out windows until interest in the great comet of 1843 led to a public subscription to construct and endow the Harvard College Observatory. The municipal Cincinnati...

Contract for Delivery with Prepayment (Salam) in Islamic Law

Contract for Delivery with Prepayment (Salam) in Islamic Law   Reference library

The Oxford International Encyclopedia of Legal History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law, History
Length:
7,137 words
Illustration(s):
1

...and contract. William Graham Sumner wrote about the centrality of contract: “A society based on contract is a society of free and independent men” (p. 26). He summarized the differences between status and contract in his 1883 book What Social Classes Owe to Each Other : In the Middle Ages men were united by custom and prescription into associations, ranks, guilds, and communities of various kinds. These ties endured as long as life lasted. Consequently society was dependent, throughout all its details, on status, and the tie, or bond, was sentimental....

England

England   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Northern Renaissance Art

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
19,563 words
Illustration(s):
2

...London, 2002) R. L. Williams : Religious Pictures and Sculpture in Elizabethan England: Censure, Appreciation and Devotion (PhD thesis, University of London, 2003) Gothic: Art for England 1400–1547 (exh. cat. ed. R. Marks and P. Williamson ; London, V&A, 2003) D. Bentley-Cranch : The Renaissance Portrait in France and England: A Comparative Study (Paris, 2004) R. Marks : Image and Devotion in Late Medieval England (Stroud, 2004) S. Foister : Holbein in England (New Haven, 2006) R. Marks : Late Gothic England: Art and Display (Donington, 2007)...

Criminal Law

Criminal Law   Reference library

The Oxford International Encyclopedia of Legal History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law, History
Length:
26,592 words
Illustration(s):
5

...to doctrine continued to plague the substantive criminal law. In the 1790s, the existence or nonexistence of federal common-law crimes sparked controversy. The U.S. Supreme Court resolved the question in 1812 , holding in United States v. Hudson and Goodwin (11 U.S. [7 Cranch] 32 [ 1812 ]), that a political opponent could not be silenced with federal libel charges in the absence of a congressional act. The codification project thus shaped federal criminal law as well as state law. In the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, the universe of...

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