You are looking at 1-20 of 8,688 entries  for:

  • All: Well of the Saints x
clear all

View:

Overview

Well of the Saints

Subject: Literature

(1905), a play by J. M. Synge. Set in Co. Wicklow, it tells of a blind couple whose sight is restored by a travelling ‘saint’.

Well of the Saints, The

Well of the Saints, The   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Companion to Irish Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Literature
Length:
30 words

... of the Saints, The ( 1905 ), a play by J. M. Synge . Set in Co. Wicklow, it tells of a blind couple whose sight is restored by a travelling ‘saint...

Well of the Saints, The

Well of the Saints, The   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Irish Phrase & Fable

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

... of the Saints, The . A play by J.M. Synge , first produced by the Irish National Theatre Society in the Abbey Theatre on 4 February 1905 to a less than enthusiastic reaction. Since the staging of In the Shadow of the Glen the Nationalist press had treated all Synge's work with suspicion. Accusations that his work was un-Irish or a slur on the decent people of the country were common, and they were to reach their climax with the response to The play-boy of the western world . Though relatively inoffensive, the theme of this, Synge's first...

Well of the Saints

Well of the Saints  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1905), a play by J. M. Synge. Set in Co. Wicklow, it tells of a blind couple whose sight is restored by a travelling ‘saint’.
Historic Churches

Historic Churches   Quick reference

David Hey

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,420 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...stone, the walls would have been plastered over and decorated with paintings, which were used both for devotional purposes and as visual aids to the story of Christianity as depicted in the Bible and the lives of saints ( see wall painting ). Over the chancel arch would have been a representation of the Day of Judgement. Images of the Virgin Mary and other saints, stained‐glass windows, painted screens, roof bosses, and memorials all added to the display of colour. Most of this was swept away at the Reformation. In his Description of England ( 1577 )...

22 The History of the Book in France

22 The History of the Book in France   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
10,032 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...near Saint-Omer; Saint-Riquier, in Picardy; Fleury (now Saint-Benoît), on the Loire near Orléans; Jumièges, on the Seine south of Rouen; Chelles, to the northeast of Paris; Corbie, near Amiens. These, along with cathedral schools in the cities named above, as well as Arles, Auxerre, Bordeaux, Laon, Lyons, Toulouse, and others, became and remained the principal centres of book production in the country until the creation of universities in the 13 th century. Their *scriptoria were among the most important of medieval Europe. While many of these made books...

25 The History of the Book in Switzerland

25 The History of the Book in Switzerland   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
1,936 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...early centre of book production before the end of the 15 th century was Geneva, where printing started in 1478 , with the Livre des saints anges , printed by Adam Steinschaber (a rare copy of which belongs to the *British Library ’s strong collection of incunables printed in Geneva). Louis Cruse (from 1479 ), Jean Belot (from 1497 ), and Wigand Köln (from 1521 ) were the chief Geneva printers in the following decades; but the Geneva book trade would no doubt have remained in the shadow of that of Lyons if it had not been for the Reformation....

Popular Culture

Popular Culture   Quick reference

Charles Phythian-Adams

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
6,654 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...from 1102 , the growing association of wells with particular saints—especially whether or not these were linked to churchyards—in fact left open the retention of personal beliefs in whatever may have been seen to lie behind their assumed curative properties, for example (see James Rattue , The Living Stream: Holy Wells in Historical Context (1995) ). The crying need for solutions to disease or physical handicaps, indeed, suffused the medieval belief system with its emphases on semi‐sacred, semi‐magical charms, and the tangible efficacy of saintly relics...

5 The European Medieval Book

5 The European Medieval Book   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
9,862 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...into the biblical canticles, and a Litany; at the end was the Office of the Dead followed by additional prayers to the Virgin Mary and the saints. The supplementary section at the very end gradually assumed ever-greater importance, consistent with the growing cult of the Virgin. It evolved into a series of eight daily occasions for devotion to the Virgin, with selections of appropriate psalms and short hymns. These were named ‘hours’ after the eight daily services of the monks: Matins, Lauds, Prime, Terce, Sext, None, Vespers, and Compline. By the third...

23 The History of the Book in the Low Countries

23 The History of the Book in the Low Countries   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
6,998 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
3

...the leading centres for the production of luxurious MSS of the highest quality after the fashion of Flemish mannerism. Many of these MSS found their way into collections of highly placed patrons and bibliophiles in the Low Countries as well as abroad, especially in France and England. The names of the artists involved are often unknown; they are referred to by such titles as the ‘Master of Mary of Burgundy’ or the ‘Master of the Dresden Hours’. Their highly specialized art continued well into the 16 th century, as can be seen in the work of one of the most...

Place-Names

Place-Names   Quick reference

Margaret Gelling

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,757 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...instances of the use as a settlement‐name of the name of the saint to whom the church is dedicated. There is a contrast with England, where it was quite rare for new names to be formed referring to minsters or churches or saints. Norse kirkja is quite common, however, especially in the compound with bý which becomes Kirby or Kirkby; and in the adjacent parts of north‐west England and south‐west Scotland kirk became an English dialect word which was used by ecclesiastical authorities there and in the Isle of Man in the naming of parishes. The ubiquitous...

37 The History of the Book in Sub-Saharan Africa

37 The History of the Book in Sub-Saharan Africa   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
5,157 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...The Ge’ez syllabary, developed from a consonantal alphabet, is still the basis for the alphabet in use in many printed works in contemporary Ethiopia—a country unique in sub-Saharan Africa for its history of written literary production dating to the first centuries of the Common Era. While copying the MS, two scribes fall into sin: an 18 th -century Ethiopian MS of the *Smithsonian ’s Miracles of the Blessed Virgin Mary and the Life of Hanna (Saint Anne) , reproduced in E. A. Wallis Budge’s *facsimile edition (1900). The Bodleian Library, University of...

Landscape History: The Countryside

Landscape History: The Countryside   Quick reference

H. S. A. Fox

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
6,175 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...cent of them are purely Celtic. Another clue is provided by the very low frequency of place‐names with elements denoting natural vegetation: the taming of the land took place so long ago (certainly before 1086 , for the Domesday Book records little wood or pasture here) that its wild state is no longer remembered in its names. Ecclesiastical evidence provides further and firmer clues. A cult of St Kew flourished among the people of this landscape at least as early as ad 900 , when a list of saints, a very rare survival, in all probability locates it...

Popular Culture

Popular Culture   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,520 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...only to the intervention of anxious ruling-class reformers. The dwindling of common land due to *enclosure limited the practice of public sports. The growth of towns and the attendant commercialization of leisure activities, as well as the regulation of work-rhythms through *industrialization [14] , also played some part in restricting open-air activity, contributing to the importance of the pub, coffeehouse, dramshop, and other venues of primarily masculine social drinking. At the same time an element within the working class began in the early...

Utopianism

Utopianism   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
4,929 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...including the abolition of war, of exploitative systems of trade, and of the domination of man over woman, white over non-white, and the powerful over the weak, resulting from the diffusion of its principles. The term ‘utopian socialism’, developed later in the writings of Marx and Engels , was used to distinguish their ‘scientific socialism’ from, for instance, *Saint-Simonianism in France and Owenism in Britain. The distinction was primarily based on the faith such movements showed in public opinion as a means of changing society. The appeal to all...

14 Printed Ephemera

14 Printed Ephemera   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
7,034 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...products of print culture, the almanac was constructed around the calendar of saints’ days and holidays laid out in the preliminaries to the Bible or to the *Book of Common Prayer . By the mid-17 th century, it was produced and sold either as a small-format leaflet of up to 24 pages or as a *folio broadside printed on one side of a sheet for public display. The Stationers’ Company held the monopoly for the calendar, and it licensed production of a changing list of almanacs under approximately fifteen different titles. These were sold in November each...

4 The History of the Book in Byzantium

4 The History of the Book in Byzantium   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
2,204 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...lives of saints and sermons by the Cappadocian Fathers and St John Chrysostom survive in considerable numbers. There was also a steady production of texts for use in school, most of which were the classics of ancient pagan literature. Some of these have come down to us in numerous copies, but this is not true of all—the frequently made assumption that each pupil owned a copy of every text in the syllabus is by no means secure. Members of the professions needed their manuals and specialized treatises; higher education, however, was much less well organized...

16 The History of Illustration and its Technologies

16 The History of Illustration and its Technologies   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
5,930 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
3

...since the plates are full of drama, including sections devoted to volcanoes—the plate by Robert of Vesuvius erupting in 1779 is especially striking. Some of the plates were engraved after Saint-Non’s own designs, and something of his devotion to creating this book can be gauged by his motto: ‘What flowers are to our gardens, the arts are to life.’ In 18 th -century England, black-and-white illustration in books became increasingly sophisticated with the growing mastery of the various metal techniques. In the first half of the century, the Opera of Horace...

Folklore, Customs, and Civic Ritual

Folklore, Customs, and Civic Ritual   Quick reference

Charles Phythian-Adams

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
6,037 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...in the medieval carvings of the so‐called Green Man ) and forces that had thus to be dealt with correctly. The human body itself was likewise regarded as a repository of forces peculiar to it. Leaving aside the power of saints’ relics or the ability of monarchs to heal by touching, even the unconsecrated hand of a newly drowned or hanged man might be wiped across someone's face to cure swellings or eye troubles. The ‘horizontal’ dichotomy between ‘culture’ and ‘nature’ at the plane of human existence was complemented by a ‘vertical’ positional hierarchy of...

26 The History of the Book in the Nordic Countries

26 The History of the Book in the Nordic Countries   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
5,145 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...the lives and miracles of local saints, annals, and registers of donations. European influence was also evident in the field of law. Legal books in Latin were imported, providing additional inspiration for the composition of provincial laws in the vernacular. As early as 1117/18 , Icelandic laws were recorded in writing. Many vernacular laws from the 12 th and 13 th centuries bear witness to strong royal powers in mainland Scandinavia; in 1274 King Magnus Lagabøtir (‘Law-amender’) promulgated a legal revision that provided a uniform law for the whole of...

Surnames

Surnames   Quick reference

David Hey

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,649 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...the time of Christ. As elsewhere, the influence of Christianity on naming patterns has been profound. The names of Irish saints, especially Patrick, Calum, and Bridget, have been widely adopted. See Donnchadh Ó Corráin and Fidelma Maguire , Gaelic Personal Names (1981) , and Patrick Hanks , Kate Hardcastle , and Flavia Hodges , A Dictionary of First Names ( 2006 ). Edward MacLysaght's The Surnames of Ireland (6th edn, 1989 ) provides the foundation for studies of Irish surnames. This contains an introduction to the subject, a dictionary of...

View: