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Walter Bradford Cannon

(1871–1945) American physiologist Cannon, who was born in Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, graduated from Harvard in 1896 and was professor of physiology there from 1906 to 1942. His ...

Cannon, Walter Bradford

Cannon, Walter Bradford (1871–1945)   Reference library

Tulley Long

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the History of American Science, Medicine, and Technology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

..., Walter Bradford ( 1871–1945 ), physiologist . Walter Bradford Cannon was born in 1871 in Wisconsin. His high school teachers in Saint Paul, Minnesota, recognized his scholastic abilities and encouraged him to attend Harvard College, even helping him to obtain a much-needed scholarship. Although punctuated by loneliness, Cannon’s time at Harvard broadened his interests considerably. Zoology proved especially compelling for Cannon, and his high marks afforded him the opportunity to conduct biological research with Charles B. Davenport. This propensity...

Cannon, Walter Bradford

Cannon, Walter Bradford   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Scientists

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Science and technology
Length:
131 words

..., Walter Bradford (1871–1945) American physiologist Cannon , who was born in Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, graduated from Harvard in 1896 and was professor of physiology there from 1906 to 1942 . His early work included studies of the digestive system, in particular the use of x-rays to study stomach disorders. For this he introduced the bismuth meal . Most of his working life, however, was spent studying the nervous system, particularly the way in which various body functions are regulated by hormones. As early as 1915 he showed the connection...

Cannon, Walter Bradford

Cannon, Walter Bradford (1871–1945)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Mind (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Science and technology, Psychology, Philosophy
Length:
207 words

..., Walter Bradford ( 1871–1945 ). American physiologist , born at Praire du Chien, Wisconsin, and educated at Harvard, where he was George Higginson Professor of Physiology at the Harvard Medical School from 1906 until 1945 . As a student of medicine he started by studying the phenomenon of swallowing; this led him to observe the motions of the stomach and intestines, and his observations were summarized in The Mechanical Factors of Digestion ( 1911 ). He gradually moved towards studies of emotion as related to bodily changes, and this resulted in...

Walter Bradford Cannon

Walter Bradford Cannon (1871–1945)   Reference library

Francis Crick

Oxford Dictionary of Scientific Quotations

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
992 words

...Walter Bradford Cannon 1871 – 1945 American physiologist Since the stomach gives no obvious external sign of its workings, investigators of gastric movements have hitherto been obliged to confine their studies to pathological subjects or to animals subjected to serious operative interference. Observations made under these necessarily abnormal conditions have yielded a literature which is full of conflicting statements and uncertain results. The only sure conclusion to be drawn from this material is that when the stomach receives food, obscure...

Walter Bradford Cannon

Walter Bradford Cannon  

(1871–1945) American physiologistCannon, who was born in Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, graduated from Harvard in 1896 and was professor of physiology there from 1906 to 1942. His early work included ...
Cannon-Bard theory

Cannon-Bard theory  

The proposition that the quality of an emotion is determined by the pattern of stimulation sent from the thalamus to the cerebral cortex, and that the bodily expression of emotion is governed by ...
fight-or-flight response

fight-or-flight response  

A term introduced by the US physiologist Walter Bradford Cannon (1871–1945), and popularized in his book Bodily Changes in Pain, Hunger, Fear and Rage (1929), for the syndrome of physiological ...
James-Lange theory

James-Lange theory  

The proposition that emotions are caused by bodily sensations. It was first propounded by the US psychologist William James (1842–1910) in the journal Mind in 1884 and most famously expounded in his ...
Reform Acts

Reform Acts  

The transition from the unreformed system of 1830 to full democracy in the 20th cent. was effected by seven franchise measures—the Acts of 1832, 1867, 1884, 1918, 1928, 1948, and 1969—supported by a ...
homeostasis

homeostasis  

Reference type:
Overview Page
n. the physiological process by which the internal systems of the body (e.g. blood pressure, body temperature, acid-base balance) are maintained at equilibrium, despite variations in the external ...
emotion

emotion  

(i-moh-shŏn)a state of arousal that can be experienced as pleasant or unpleasant. Emotions can have three components: for example, fear can involve an unpleasant subjective experience, an increase in ...
Cannon–Bard theory

Cannon–Bard theory n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...–Bard theory n. The proposition that the quality of an emotion is determined by the pattern of stimulation sent from the thalamus to the cerebral cortex , and that the bodily expression of emotion is governed by signals from the thalamus to muscles and glands. Also called Cannon’s theory or the Bard–Cannon theory . Compare James–Lange theory . [Named after the US physiologist Walter Bradford Cannon ( 1871–1945 ) and the US psychologist Philip Bard ( 1898–1977 ) who were the first to suggest it in the...

sympathin

sympathin n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... n . An obsolete name for adrenalin , introduced by the US physiologist Walter Bradford Cannon ( 1871–1945 ) and the Belgian radiobiologist and inventor Zénon M(arcel) Bacq ( 1903–83 ) in an article in the American Journal of Physiology in 1931 : ‘Because the substance is derived from structures under sympathetic control, when they are influenced by sympathetic impulses, we suggest that it be called sympathin’ (p....

fight or flight reaction

fight or flight reaction   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Zoology (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
95 words

...animal, or to confront the danger and if necessary fight the aggressor. The responses include rapid breathing, increased heart rate, inhibition of stomach and intestinal movement, and sweating. The phenomenon was first described in 1915 by the American physiologist Walter Bradford Cannon ( 1871–1945 ). It is now recognized as the first stage of the general-adaptation syndrome...

homeostasis

homeostasis n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... n . The maintenance of equilibrium in any physiological, psychological, or social process by an automatic feedback mechanism compensating for disrupting changes. The word was coined by the US physiologist Walter Bradford Cannon ( 1871–1945 ) and became popular after the publication in 1932 of his book The Wisdom of the Body , in which the process is described in relation to the automatic maintenance of body temperature and components of blood, including water, salt, sugar, proteins, fat, calcium, oxygen, hydrogen ions—the list could be...

fight-or-flight response

fight-or-flight response n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...response n. A term introduced by the US physiologist Walter Bradford Cannon ( 1871–1945 ), and popularized in his book Bodily Changes in Pain, Hunger, Fear and Rage ( 1929 ), for the syndrome of physiological responses of an organism confronted with a situation that evokes fear, pain, or anger, such responses being mobilized by the secretion of adrenalin (epinephrine) from the adrenal medulla, preparing the organism to fight or to flee. It includes increased blood pressure, accelerated heart rate, deepened respiration, increased...

James–Lange theory

James–Lange theory n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...state, equating emotion with the bodily (especially visceral) events themselves. The main problem with the theory, first pointed out in 1927 by the US physiologist Walter Bradford Cannon ( 1871–1945 ), is that the physiological changes accompanying qualitatively different emotions are often very similar. See also cognitive‐appraisal theory , facial feedback hypothesis . Compare Cannon–Bard theory...

voodoo death

voodoo death n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... z’étoile (star of destiny) and the two components of the soul, namely the gros-bon-ange (great good angel) and the ti-bon-ange (little good angel), both of which survive death and are susceptible to sorcery. The term was brought to prominence by the US physiologist Walter Bradford Cannon ( 1871–1945 ) in an article entitled ‘ “Voodoo” Death’ in the journal American Anthropologist in 1942 . Also called thanatomania . See also Baskerville effect , nocebo effect , zombie ( 2 ) . [From Louisiana French voudou , from West African Ewe vodu a...

clinicopathological conference

clinicopathological conference   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Medicine and health
Length:
1,146 words

...of disease, the conference has served as an excellent teaching tool, emphasizing the importance of a well-taken medical history and investigation. As a form of continuing medical education, it is unparalleled. Cannon, Walter Bradford Cabot, Richard Clarke Sanjay A. Pai See also education ; grand rounds ; journals ; pathology Cannon, Walter Bradford ( 1871–1945 ). American physiologist . He was professor of physiology at Harvard Medical School from 1906 to 1945 . He carried out early studies of the upper gastrointestinal tract in animals and man using...

museums

museums   Reference library

J. A. Cannon

The Oxford Companion to British History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
691 words

...Museum ( 1852 ) and the Science Museum at South Kensington were part of a great complex triggered by the Great Exhibition of 1851 . Most of the national museums have branches: the Science Museum runs the railway museum at York and the Museum of Photography, Film, and TV at Bradford. In addition to the great national museums, municipal museums were founded, assisted by friendly legislation: an Act for encouraging the establishment of museums in large towns ( 1845 ) permitted the raising of a halfpenny rate. The Liverpool Museum opened in 1851 , the...

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