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wave

N.a formation of forces, landing ships, craft, amphibious vehicles or aircraft, required to beach or land about the same time. According to type, function, or order, a wave may ...

waves

waves   Quick reference

M. V. Angel

The Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
459 words

...(70-ft) wave that smashed windows and sent water cascading through six of its decks. In the open ocean waves do not result in flows of water. A cork floating in the water just bobs up and down and does not move laterally. However, as a wave approaches a shore, the frictional drag of the bottom slows its speed, so its leading face steepens and the distance between it and the wave before and after shortens. Eventually the wave crest overtakes the base of the wave and it breaks. Waves predominantly travel in the direction of the prevailing wind. When waves approach...

WAVES

WAVES   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to World War II

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

... , Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service , the US naval women's service, established in June 1942 . More than 900 shore stations were staffed by 86,000 of...

WAVES

WAVES   Reference library

The Oxford Essential Dictionary of the U.S. Military

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

... wāvz plural n. the women's section of the U.S. Naval Reserve, established in 1942 , or, since 1948 , of the U.S. Navy. acronym from Women Appointed (later Accepted ) for Volunteer Emergency Service...

WAVES

WAVES   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to American Military History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...(female) who served temporarily during World War I. WAVES worked at naval shore establishments across the United States as chauffeurs, cryptologists, recruiters, and stenographers. They also filled nontraditional billets as air traffic controllers, link trainers, mechanics, and parachute riggers. About one‐third of the WAVES served in the communications and aviation communities. By 1944 , the need to relieve men stationed in Alaska and Hawaii led the navy to amend the original bill that had limited WAVES to duty within the continental United States. Nothing...

beta waves

beta waves   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Biomedicine (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019

...beta waves Waves of brain electrical activity at ~15–60...

millimetre waves

millimetre waves   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Astronomy (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...waves Electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths in the approximate range 1–10 mm. Wavelengths shorter than 1 mm are known as submillimetre waves...

Alfvén waves

Alfvén waves   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Geology and Earth Sciences (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

...waves Magnetohydrodynamic waves that are produced by coupling forces between the geomagnetic field and highly conductive fluids. Alfvén waves travel along magnetic field lines when jets of highly conductive fluid or charged particles flow across the field lines. The waves were discovered by the Swedish astrophysicist Hannes Olof Gösta Alfvén ( 1908–95...

seismic waves

seismic waves   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Physics (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Science and technology, Physics
Length:
215 words

...seismic waves Vibrations propagated within the earth or along its surface as a result of an earthquake or explosion. Earthquakes generate two types of body waves that travel within the earth and two types of surface wave. The body waves consist of primary (or longitudinal) waves that impart a back-and-forth motion to rock particles along their path. They travel at speeds between 6 km per second in surface rock and 10.4 km per second near the earth’s core. Secondary (or transverse or shear) waves cause rock particles to move back and forth perpendicularly...

delta waves

delta waves   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Biomedicine (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019

...delta waves Waves of high amplitude and low frequency (1–3 Hz) that can be detected in electroencephalographic recordings and that are characteristic of deep sleep. Delta-type sleep can be induced by delta sleep-inducing peptide...

lee waves

lee waves   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Geology and Earth Sciences (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

...waves Air waves in the lee of a mountain barrier, where a stable layer of air, after displacement by movement over the barrier, returns to its original level. This process results in a series of stationary (‘standing’) waves extending downwind on the lee side of the barrier. Clouds often form along the wave crests in lenticular form: they may appear stationary, due to condensation of water vapour at the upward side, caused by the upward air movement, and evaporation on the downward side of the wave. The wavelength can be up to 40 km and the wave amplitude is...

gravitational waves

gravitational waves   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Physics (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Science and technology, Physics
Length:
296 words

...waves, so the acceleration of a massive body generates gravitational waves. The existence of gravitational waves was predicted by Albert Einstein in 1916 , very soon after he formulated the general theory of relativity. It is much more difficult to detect gravitational waves than electromagnetic waves, because the interaction between a gravitational wave and a detector is so much weaker. The very small vibration of the detector due to gravitational waves makes it necessary that great care is taken to avoid the effects of external disturbances and thermal...

millimetre waves

millimetre waves   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Electronics and Electrical Engineering (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...waves Electromagnetic radiation at frequencies between 30 and 300 gigahertz, which result in wavelengths of millimetre dimensions. ...

Rossby waves

Rossby waves   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Geology and Earth Sciences (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

...waves Named after the Swedish-American meteorologist Carl-Gustav Rossby ( 1898–1957 ), Rossby waves are equatorward troughs and poleward ridges forming long waves in the circumpolar flow of the upper air, particularly in the mid and upper troposphere , with a typical wavelength of around 2000 km. Three or four waves usually occur in the circumpolar westerly wind flow over mid latitudes. They may remain stationary (as standing waves ) when wind speed and wavelength have a given relationship. The waves may be initiated by lower winds over mountain...

electromagnetic waves

electromagnetic waves   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Space Exploration (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...electromagnetic waves Oscillating electric and magnetic fields travelling together through space at a speed of nearly 300 000 kps. Visible light is composed of electromagnetic waves. The electromagnetic spectrum is a family of waves that includes radio waves, infrared radiation, visible light, ultraviolet radiation, X-rays, and gamma rays. All electromagnetic waves are transverse waves. They can be reflected, refracted, diffracted, and polarized. Radio and television waves lie at the long wavelength–low frequency end of the spectrum, with wavelengths longer...

submillimetre waves

submillimetre waves   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Chemistry (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Science and technology, Chemistry
Length:
46 words

...waves Electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths below one millimetre (and therefore frequencies greater than 300 gigahertz), extending to radiation of the far infrared. A source of submillimetre radiation is a medium pressure mercury lamp in quartz. Submillimetre waves can be detected by a Golay cell...

submillimetre waves

submillimetre waves   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Physics (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Science and technology, Physics
Length:
46 words

...submillimetre waves Electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths below one millimetre (and therefore frequencies greater than 300 gigahertz), extending to radiation of the far infrared. A source of submillimetre radiation is a medium pressure mercury lamp in quartz. Submillimetre waves can be detected by a Golay cell...

radio waves

radio waves   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Astronomy (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...waves Electromagnetic radiation of wavelength longer than about 1 mm (30 GHz). The longest radio waves observable by radio astronomers have a wavelength of about 30 m (10 MHz) ( see radio window ). The shortest radio wavelengths, from about 1 mm to 30 cm, are known as microwaves...

new waves

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A Dictionary of Film Studies (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Media studies
Length:
403 words

.... The term ‘new wave’ was first applied to the Nouvelle Vague —the French New Wave—in 1959 , and the following decade saw the rise of new cinemas in a number of other countries, among them Britain ( see british new wave ), Czechoslovakia ( see czech New Wave ), India ( see new indian cinema ), Japan , Latin America , Poland , Switzerland , and West Germany ( see new german cinema ). In filmmaking terms, the movement has had enormous international impact, inspiring further new waves the world over: the 1980s and 1990s, for example, saw the...

Rossby Waves

Rossby Waves   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Climate and Weather (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Science and technology, Earth Sciences and Geography, Social sciences, Environment
Length:
3,716 words
Illustration(s):
1

...the dynamics of Rossby waves are also present in the stratosphere. Assuming that waves propagating upward provide a constant vertical flux of wave energy, the amplitude of the waves must increase as the waves propagate away from the troposphere into a region of falling air density. When the wave amplitude becomes too large, the waves break like water waves crashing on a beach. Observations of such wave breaking in the stratosphere have been reported in the scientific literature. Theoretical understanding of the dynamics of Rossby waves is brought to bear when...

gravitational waves

gravitational waves   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Cosmology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Science and technology, Astronomy and Cosmology
Length:
1,838 words
Illustration(s):
2

...waves Gravitational waves are ripples in space-time , which propagate as waves at the speed of light. They are predicted by Albert Einstein 's theory of general relativity . They have never been directly observed, but their existence has been inferred indirectly through studies of binary pulsar systems. In the context of cosmology , they are sometimes referred to as tensor perturbations . Properties of gravitational waves Gravitational waves are described in Einstein's theory as wave-like configurations in the curvature of space-time....

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