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Overview

Veneering, Mr and Mrs

Subject: Literature

In Dickens's Our Mutual Friend, types of flashy social parvenus.

Veneering, Mr and Mrs

Veneering, Mr and Mrs  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
In Dickens's Our Mutual Friend, types of flashy social parvenus.
Our Mutual Friend

Our Mutual Friend  

A novel by Dickens, published in monthly parts between May 1864 and Nov. 1865.John Harmon returns from the exile to which he has been sent by a harsh father, a rich dust‐contractor; he expects to ...
Our Mutual Friend

Our Mutual Friend   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Literature
Length:
352 words

...is thus facilitated; he assumes the name of John Rokesmith and becomes the secretary of the kindly, disinterested Mr Boffin, old Harmon's foreman, who, in default of young Harmon, inherits the property. He meets Bella, who is adopted by Boffin and whose wealth has made her a coldly disdainful young woman. Rokesmith nevertheless falls in love with her and is contemptuously rejected. Harmon's identity is now discovered by the amiable Mrs Boffin, and the Boffins, devoted to their old master's son and convinced of Bella's soundness of heart, contrive a plot to...

Our Mutual Friend

Our Mutual Friend   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to English Literature (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature
Length:
467 words

...is thus facilitated; he assumes the name of John Rokesmith and becomes the secretary of the kindly, disinterested Mr Boffin, old Harmon's foreman, who, in default of young Harmon, inherits the property. He meets Bella, who is adopted by Boffin and whose wealth has made her a coldly disdainful young woman. Rokesmith nevertheless falls in love with her and is contemptuously rejected. Harmon's identity is now discovered by the amiable Mrs Boffin, and the Boffins, devoted to their old master's son and convinced of Bella's soundness of heart, contrive a plot to...

servants and domestic work

servants and domestic work   Reference library

Valerie Purton

The Oxford Reader's Companion to Dickens

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
1,686 words

...The Pickwick/Sam relationship is parodied by that between Mr Jingle and Job Trotter ; in Barnaby Rudge John Grueby , the good servant of Lord George Gordon, is balanced by the sharp and shrewish Miggs, Mrs Varden 's servant and maid-of-all-work. Later novels have their share of discontented and even sinister servants. Jeremiah Flintwinch in Little Dorrit , a transgressive figure who ‘might … be a clerk or a servant’ ( LD 1.3) exercises a tyrannical power over his wife, Affery, and over the Clennam household. Hortense, the lady's maid in Bleak...

Our Mutual Friend

Our Mutual Friend   Reference library

Paul Schlicke

The Oxford Reader's Companion to Dickens

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
3,079 words

...to John Harmon , to live with them, and they adopt an orphan who dies. Patronized by the Veneerings, Mr and Mrs Lammle are married on the presumption of each other's wealth, only to discover that neither has any. They vow vengeance on society and befriend ‘the Young Person’, Georgiana Podsnap , daughter of the pompous and opinionated John Podsnap , and encourage a match between her and the mean and hypocritical Fascination Fledgeby. Gaffer Hexam , falsely accused by another riverside scavenger, Rogue Riderhood , of murdering Harmon , drowns. Eugene...

domesticity

domesticity   Reference library

Sally Ledger

The Oxford Reader's Companion to Dickens

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
2,415 words

...become a torture, as when Pip is subjected to Christmas Dinner with Mrs Gargery , his unfeeling older sister, and the reproving Uncle Pumblechook ( GE ). The absence of hot food at Paul's christening ( DS ) is likewise an indication of that family's frigid domestic arrangements. The domestic idyll features throughout Dickens's fiction. The wedding scene in Pickwick , where the reader is shown a stable, happy home in the midst of festivities, is another example. Mr and Mrs Toodles ( DS ) have ‘a clean parlour full of children’, their particular...

class and status

class and status   Reference library

Robin Gilmour

The Oxford Reader's Companion to Dickens

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
1,981 words

...'s realization that Dombey is a coming man, and in his subsequent successful attempts to bring Dombey and his aristocratic friends together at Leamington. Mr Dombey is not a complex character, but the issues of class and social change are touched on with a subtlety new in Dickens. ‘Despite their descents into the lowest class,’ Mrs Oliphant wrote in 1855 , ‘and their occasional flights into the less familiar ground of fashion, it is the air and breath of middle-class respectability which fills the books of Mr Dickens.’ This statement holds true of David...

Davys, Mary

Davys, Mary   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of British Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature
Length:
1,839 words

... are compelling and point to the seriousness that lies beneath the humorous veneer of Davys's work. Even though the comic outcome of Davys's novel avoids the tragic events that conclude the later text, the similarities of subject matter suggest that Richardson owed many debts of plot and situation to the amatory fiction written by women novelists of the early eighteenth century. Mary Davys is also important for the contribution her work makes to the history of pre-Richardson epistolary fiction. Throughout her novels she employs lively and believable letters...

drink and temperance

drink and temperance   Reference library

Robert Patten

The Oxford Reader's Companion to Dickens

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
2,467 words

...friends ‘Drinking to Mr Pell’ (there are 250 references to drink in Pickwick ; only the last is to abstinence), and David Copperfield giving his ‘magnificent order at the public-house’ for ‘a glass of the Genuine Stunning’. With John leech , he shows Scrooge and Bob Cratchit sharing a Christmas bowl of smoking bishop. John Willet 's Maypole Inn at Chigwell ( BR ), with its gables and huge zigzag chimneys and diamond-pane lattices, its ruddy fires and oak panelling and gleaming tankards, is the most elaborately described of Dickens's travellers' inns....

London

London   Reference library

Andrew Sanders, Andrew Sanders, Andrew Sanders, Andrew Sanders, Paul Schlicke, David Parker, Andrew Sanders, David Parker, Andrew Sanders, Andrew Sanders, Anne Humpherys, and David Parker

The Oxford Reader's Companion to Dickens

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
12,756 words

...Belgrave Square’ ( NN 21). Mr and Mrs Wititterly are among the occupants of Cadogan Place, who do not claim to be ‘on precisely the same footing as the high folks of Belgrave Square and Grosvenor Place’, but who ‘look down upon Sloane Street, and think Brompton low. They affect fashion too, and wonder where the New Road is’ ( NN 21). ‘Stucconia’, Dickens's term for the streets and squares north of Oxford Street, is where he lodges his successful businessmen, such as Mr Veneering ( OMF 1.10) and Mr Dombey ( DS 3). Miss Tox and Major Bagstock , with their...

Shaw, George Bernard

Shaw, George Bernard   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of British Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature
Length:
6,010 words
Illustration(s):
1

...cultural elitism and a sexism bordering on misogyny. While this is a genteel kind of darkness—if moral darkness can ever be genteel—and it is generally hidden beneath a veneer of civility (whereas Kurtz's darkness had broken through any facade of civilization), there is something rotten in the state of England, and Shaw knows it. And in Pygmalion , he tries to show it. Shaw's style of writing stands in bold contrast to the devious narrative tactics made popular in the work of his modernist colleagues Conrad, Joyce, and Ford Madox Ford ; and while it is...

Vaudeville

Vaudeville   Reference library

The International Encyclopedia of Dance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Dance, Music
Length:
3,045 words

...film engagements, Mae Murray and Clifton Webb toured in Society Dances , disseminating throughout the provinces such urban fads as a “Valse d'Arlequin,” a “Brazilian Maxixe,” a “Cinquante-Cinquante Tango,” and a “Barcarole Waltz.” Other popular teams included Mr. and Mrs. Carter De Haven , the “Beau Ideals”; the French Mitty and Tillo; the English Ted Trevor and Diane Harris ; the suave and syncopated Tony and Renée De Marco; and Fred and Adele Astaire . The Astaire siblings played vaudeville as early as 1908 (Hudson Theater, New York City) in an...

Domestic Fiction

Domestic Fiction   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of British Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature
Length:
3,038 words

...manual, the cookbook, and the home design journal, in which the idea of home was gradually developed. We learn from these texts lessons about the material culture of home and the symbolic fine points of domesticity: the “bran-new” stuff of the Veneering family or the excessively heavy plate of the Podsnaps in Dickens's Our Mutual Friend ( 1865 ) provides us with a handy index of arriviste excess; the few pieces of “old mahogany” furniture Jane Eyre purchases for her cousins’ home are an example of restrained good taste. And although we imagine economic...

The Criminalization of Homosexuality in Popular Cinema

The Criminalization of Homosexuality in Popular Cinema   Reference library

Derek Dalton

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Crime, Media, and Popular Culture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Social sciences
Length:
15,058 words

...Ripley is eventually confronted by Marge, Mr. Greenleaf, and the private detective. Certain sordid details about Dickie’s life have come to light and Mr. Greenleaf now wants the investigation dropped. Marge furiously accuses Ripley of being involved in Dickie’s disappearance before Greenleaf and the private detective drag her away. Mr. Greenleaf offers to pay Ripley a substantial portion of Dickie’s trust fund in exchange for his silence. Protecting the family name from the involvement of the Italian police and scandal appear to be more important to...

Frames

Frames   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of American Art

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
8,079 words

.... They stated that “it could be got in London cheaper and better than with us.” In comparing the Rococo frames on two portraits by John Singleton Copley there is a marked difference between the frame on the painting of Mrs John Scollay ( 1763 ; New York, Kennedy Gals) and the frame on Mr Isaac Smith ( 1769 ; New Haven, CT, Yale U. A.G.). The profile on the earlier portrait is quite simple and consists of two flat boards that have been joined at an angle and later carved with typical foliate designs and piercing. The profile on the later portrait is an...

Popular Romance

Popular Romance   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of British Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature
Length:
5,501 words

...and thus a thin veneer of formal respectability. Manley justifies her innovation by devaluing romance ideals and most particularly the “Extraordinary Virtues of their Heroins, exempted from all the Weakness of Humane Nature, and much above the Infirmities of their Sex” accordingly the seduction plots in such chronicles as The New Atalantis ( 1709 ) are brought quickly to their climax, each following another in rapid succession. As in the French romances, though, the adventures are plentiful, and their digressive sequence lacks the cause and effect...

brand-new

brand-new   Reference library

Fowler’s Dictionary of Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

.... Correctly so spelt, with a hyphen, being (in the 16c.) formed from brand ‘burning (wooden) torch’ + new (i.e. fresh as from the furnace). Because the - d - is frequently not pronounced, the spelling bran-new was a common variant almost from the beginning, e.g. Mr. and Mrs. Veneering were bran-new people in a bran-new house (Dickens, 1865 ), but brand-new is the standard...

Under Milk Wood

Under Milk Wood (1944–53)   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Plays (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...the nymphomaniac Mae Rose Cottage; Bessie Bighead, slovenly hired help; Ocky Milkman; Dai Bread; Mr Pugh, schoolmaster; 85-year-old Mary Ann Sailors; eccentric Lord Cut-Glass with his collection of clocks; several others, and, of course, the gossiping neighbours. Revd Eli Jenkins greets the new spring day with a song; Mr Pugh, who hates his nagging wife, brings her tea, while plotting to poison her; Mr and Mrs Cherry Owen laugh about his drunken escapades; and everyone goes about their daily business until it is night once more. Originally written for radio,...

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