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Vedānta

Subject: Religion

A Hindu philosophy based on the doctrine of the Upanishads, especially in its monistic form.

Vedanta

Vedanta   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

... Literally meaning “end or culmination of the Vedas ,” Vedanta is essentially a Hindu religious tradition based on the Upanishads . Vedanta stresses the inner spiritual life, the presence of Brahman as the absolute that is everywhere and nowhere and yet present in the material and personal world as the eternal Self, or Atman . Vedanta also relies on the wisdom contained in the Brahma Sutra , or Vedanta Sutra , and the great philosophical book of the Mahabharata known as the Bhagavadgita . In the latter, Krishna , as the Pandava hero ...

Vedanta

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Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

... (Sanskrit, ‘end of the Veda’) The upanishads or philosophy of the Upanishads, the system of Hindu philosophy based on the vedas...

Vedānta

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A Dictionary of Asian Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

... Literally meaning end or culmination of the Vedas ( see Vedas ), Vedānta is essentially a Hindu ( see Hinduism entries) religious tradition based on the Upaniṣads ( see Upaniṣads ). Vedānta stresses the inner spiritual life, the presence of Brahman ( see Brahman ) as the absolute that is everywhere and nowhere and yet present in the material and personal world as the eternal Self, or Ātman ( see Ātman ). Vedānta also relies on the wisdom contained in the Brahmā Sūtra , or Vedānta Sūtra , and the great philosophical book of the Mahābhārata (...

Vedanta

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The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
71 words

... The school of Hindu philosophy most concerned to protect the literal truth of the Upanishads , and therefore most critical of the dualistic and realistic tendencies in other Indian philosophical schools. The purest monism ( advaita or non-duality) recognizes only brahman (identified with atman , as the Upanishads require), and is especially associated with the philosopher Shankara . http://www.vedanta.org/wiv/overview.html An overview of the Vedanta with links to other...

Vedānta

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The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Religion
Length:
132 words

... (Skt., ‘Veda’ + ‘end’). The end, i.e. culmination, of the Vedas , especially as contained in the last section of the Veda , the Upaniṣads . However, Vedānta understood as the culmination of the Vedas in ordered reflection (i.e. as a philosophical and religious tradition) rests also on the Bhagavad-gītā and on the Brahma Sūtra of Bādarāyaṇa (also known as Vedānta Sūtra ) which attempted to bring order and harmony to the scattered reflections in the Upaniṣads on the nature of Brahman and the relation of Brahman to the created order, in...

Vedanta

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World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
95 words

... (Sanskrit, ‘conclusion of the Vedas ’) Best known and most popular form of Indian philosophy; it forms the foundation for most modern schools of thought in Hinduism . One of the most influential Vedanta schools was that expounded by the 7th-8th-century philosopher Sankara. This school holds that the natural world is an illusion. There is only one self, Brahman -Atman; ignorance of the oneness of the self with Brahman is the cause of rebirth. The system includes a belief in the transmigration of souls and the desirability of release from the cycle of...

Vedānta

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A Dictionary of Hinduism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
502 words

... (‘ the conclusion, essence, or culmination of the Veda ’) 1 A term for the Upaniṣads . 2 A highly influential theological and philosophical tradition, also known as Uttara Mīmāṃsā—‘Later Exegesis’. The Vedānta tradition incorporates a number of different schools, although in modern works it is listed (as a composite) as one of the six ‘orthodox’ darśanas or ‘schools of philosophy’, where it is paired with Pūrva Mīmāṃsā (‘Prior Exegesis’), which it both complements and succeeds. Vedānta derives its name from its basic dependence on the teachings...

Vedānta

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The Oxford Companion to Philosophy (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
403 words

...life after death, re-embodiment, and the state of liberation, and they prescribe techniques of meditation leading to that state. Competing commentaries on the Brahma Sūtras engendered schools of Vedānta such as the non-dualism of Śaṇkara , the qualified monism of Rāmānuja , the dualism of Madhva , the identity-in-difference of Nīmbarka , etc. Non-dualist Vedānta upholds absolute subjective consciousness as the only reality, regards the external world of plurality as false appearance, and establishes that the individual self is strictly identical with that...

Neo-Vedānta

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A Dictionary of Hinduism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
56 words

...Vedānta A term used to designate the Advaita Vedānta -derived teachings of Vivekānanda . These provided the material for the Vedānta Society and the Rāmakrishna Mission to promote ‘Hinduism’ (essentially Advaita Vedānta) as a (in some sense the ) world religion—one based on what were perceived to be universally valid, and scientifically consonant, ethical principles. See also Neo-Hinduism...

Advaita Vedānta

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A Dictionary of Asian Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

...Vedānta One of several interpretations of Vedānta Hinduism ( see Vedānta ), Advaita Vedānta ( see Advaita ) was developed probably in the eighth and ninth centuries ce by the philosopher Śaṇkara. For followers of this branch of the religion, Brahman ( see Brahman ) is the Absolute, the undifferentiated reality underlying all apparent reality. Even the differentiation between the individual (or self) and Brahman is ultimately illusory. The proper path for humans is to discover the oneness of the self ( see Ātman ) and Brahman. With this realization...

Advaita Vedanta

Advaita Vedanta   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

...Vedanta One of several interpretations of Vedanta Hinduism, Advaita Vedanta was developed probably in the eighth and ninth centuries c.e. by the philosopher Sankara . For followers of this branch of the religion, the closest concept to a supreme deity is Brahman , the absolute undifferentiated principle underlying all apparent reality. Even the differentiation between the individual, or self, and Brahman is ultimately illusory. The proper path for humans is to discover the oneness of the self ( Atman )— what some in other cultures might call the...

Vedānta Society

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A Dictionary of Hinduism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
37 words

... Society An organization founded by Svāmī Vivekānanda in New York in 1895 , during a two-year visit to the West. It became the parent body for the propagating the teachings of the Rāmakṛṣṇa Mission in the...

Dvaita Vedānta

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A Dictionary of Hinduism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
153 words

...Vedānta (‘ Brahmasampradāya ’ ( N. India ) (‘ Dualistic Vedānta ’) One of the four major Vaiṣṇava sampradāyas , a theistic school of Vedānta founded by Madhva . It is dualistic in so far as it maintains, in contrast to Śaṅkara 's Advaita Vedānta and Rāmānuja 's Viśiṣṭādvaita , an absolute and irreducible distinction between the world and Brahman , its creator and Lord (equated with Viṣṇu by Madhva ). Madhva develops this further by positing a fundamental distinction—five differences, or pañcabheda—between Brahman and individual selves...

Vedanta Society

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The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Religion
Length:
63 words

... Society . A Hindu movement formed in New York in 1896 by Swami Vivekananda , a disciple of Sri Ramakrishna . It is the W. branch of the Ramakrishna Math (monastery), based at Belur near Calcutta, and was established for the purpose of acquainting the West with the spiritual heritage of India in return for the scientific, educational, and other material benefits of the...

Advaita Vedānta

Advaita Vedānta   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Religion
Length:
160 words

...Vedānta . One of the three major philosophical/theological systems in Hindu Vedānta , whose leading protagonist was Śaṅkara . Brahman is the Absolute and underlying ground of all appearance: for those with (trained) eyes to see, Brahman can be perceived as the real and the unchanging lying within or behind the manifold appearances which the senses encounter. There cannot, therefore, be any truth in the human propensity to differentiate objects, or parts of objects, as though they have the reality of their superficial appearance. There is only...

Viśiṣṭādvaita-vedānta

Viśiṣṭādvaita-vedānta   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Religion
Length:
145 words

...vedānta . The teaching and school, in Hinduism, of qualified non-duality, in contrast to Advaita . The name is derived from viśiṣṭa (‘distinct’, ‘particular to’) and advaita (‘not-dual’). Although introduced by the Vaiṣṇava writer, Yamunācārya, the school is usually associated with Rāmānuja . The world, selves, and God are all real, but the world and self depend on God, since God creates the cosmos out of his subtle body by transforming it into a gross one—though he does not prevent faults or blemishes occurring. Selves depend in such a...

Advaita Vedānta

Advaita Vedānta   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Hinduism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
786 words

...Vedānta (‘ Non-dualistic Vedānta ’, ‘ non-dualism ’) One of the major theological cum philosophical schools of the Vedānta darśana , now closely associated with the teachings of Śaṅkara (Śaṅkarācārya). The earliest identifiable Advaita text, the Gauḍapādīya Kārikā , was said to have been composed by Śaṅkara's paramaguru (his teacher's teacher), Gauḍapāda . The Kārikā propounds the non-dual (advaita) nature of ultimate reality ( brahman (neut.), and the complete identity of brahman and ātman . It regards the world of apparent change and...

Vedanta

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The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

... a Hindu philosophy based on the doctrine of the Upanishads, especially in its monistic...

Vedanta

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New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
114 words

... • barter , Bata, cantata, carter, cassata, charter, chipolata, ciabatta, darter, desiderata, errata, garter, imprimatur, Inkatha, Jakarta, Magna Carta, Maratha, martyr, Odonata, passata, persona non grata, rata, Renata, Río de la Plata, serenata, sonata, Sparta, starter, strata, taramasalata, tartar, Tatar, Zapata • after , drafter, grafter, hereafter, laughter, rafter, thereafter, whereafter • chanter , enchanter, granter, planter, supplanter, transplanter, Vedanta • blaster , caster, castor, faster, grandmaster, headmaster, master, pastor,...

Vedanta

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Oxford Dictionary of English (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
64 words

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