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Tyche

Fate, fortune both good and bad. Like Moira (see fate), Tyche gives everything to mortals from birth. The mightiest of the Moirai in Pindar, she is the child of Zeus Eleutherius. A ...

Tȳchē

Tȳchē (‘Chance’, ‘Fortune’, good or bad)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Classical Literature (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Classical studies
Length:
123 words

... (‘Chance’, ‘Fortune’, good or bad) In Greek religious thought the incalculable element in life. In popular belief each person and city had its own tyche , much like a daimon . Pindar calls Tyche one of the Fates, stronger than her sisters, and the child of Zeus Eleutherios, but she is not mentioned in Homer and never became fully personified or a subject of myth. On the whole she is favourable, but Sophocles has Oedipus dangerously calling himself ‘the child of Tyche’. In New Comedy she is capricious and senseless; in the novels a useful expedient for a...

Tychē

Tychē   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
158 words

... , fate, fortune both good and bad. Like Moira ( see fate ), Tyche gives everything to mortals from birth. The mightiest of the Moirai in Pindar , she is the child of Zeus Eleutherius . A splendid lyric fragment praises noble Tyche who dispenses more good than evil from her scales: grace shines about her golden wing, and she lights up the darkness. Though ambivalent by nature, she tends to be favourable, comparable with the agathos daimōn . The popular view of a capricious, malignant Tyche emerges from New Comedy : she was dangerous, senseless,...

Tyche

Tyche   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
744 words

... (τύχη), fate, fortune, or chance, a complex concept inherited from antiquity. As a symbol of prosperity and success, tyche (as popular superstition) was often connected with cities, including Constantinople ( Janin , CP byz. 438). The emperors were also considered to have their tyche , the survival of the Roman concept of an individual's genius, as embodiment or special protector. Hagiography developed the topos of martyrs who refused to swear an oath to the imperial tyche . At the same time there were some attempts to adjust the pagan concept of ...

Tyche

Tyche   Reference library

Noel Robertson and B. C. Dietrich

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
921 words

... , fate, fortune both good and bad. The connection with τυγχάνειν always remains evident, reinforcing the sense of sudden change and fortuitous happenings in the individual's life. Like Moira ( see fate ), Tyche gives everything to mortals from birth (Archil. fr. 16; Eur. IA 1136; Philemon, in Stob. 1. 6. 11). The mightiest of the Moirai in Pindar (Hymn to Tyche in Paus. 7. 26. 8), she is the child of Zeus Eleutherius (Pind. Ol. 12. 1 f.). A splendid lyric fragment praises noble Tyche who dispenses more good than evil from her scales: grace shines...

Tyche

Tyche  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Fate, fortune both good and bad. Like Moira (see fate), Tyche gives everything to mortals from birth. The mightiest of the Moirai in Pindar, she is the child of Zeus Eleutherius. A splendid lyric ...
Eutychides

Eutychides  

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Sicyonian sculptor, pupil of Lysippus (2), active c. 330–290 bc. Famed for his Tyche for Antioch (1) (founded in 300), known in many copies and widely imitated by other cities ...
Adventus

Adventus  

(ἀπάντησις), ceremonial arrival rooted in ancient society and religion. Although Byz. adventus ceremonies were held to greet bishops, officials, and saints' relics, the most spectacular adventus ...
Esquiline Treasure

Esquiline Treasure  

A hoard of mostly domestic objects made in the 4th C., unearthed on the Esquiline Hill in Rome in 1793. The precise contents of the treasure are a matter of ...
tychism

tychism  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Philosophy
(Greek, tychē, luck or chance)The view associated with Peirce that chance is a real force in the universe; more recently, the view that chance mutations are the basis of evolutionary adaptation.
Marriage Belt

Marriage Belt  

Apparently one of the customary gifts from groom to bride. Unlike the marriage ring and marriage crown, it was associated with the nuptial chamber, rather than the wedding ceremony (A. ...
Tabula Peutingeriana

Tabula Peutingeriana  

A parchment map of the 12th or early 13th C., now in Vienna (ÖNB, Vindobon. 324), named after its former owner, Konrad Peutinger (1465–1547), a humanist of Augsburg. It is ...
Doukas

Doukas  

(c.1400–after 1462),Byzantine historian. His baptismal name is not known, though historians sometimes assume that he was called Michael, which was his grandfather's name. Doukas first appears in the ...
Basilikos Logos

Basilikos Logos  

(βασιλικòς λόγος), a variety of enkomion addressed to an emperor on some notable occasion. Menander Rhetor (pp.76–94) set out the form and the sentiments considered appropriate; the major points were ...
Chalcondyles (Chalcocondylas), Laonicus

Chalcondyles (Chalcocondylas), Laonicus  

(c.1423–after 1461) Historian; only a few details of his life are known.In 1447 he was a pupil of Georgius Gemistus Pletho at Mistra. He wrote a history about the ...
Leo the Deacon

Leo the Deacon  

Historian; born ca.950 in Kaloe at Tmolos (Asia Minor), died after 992 or 994. Leo received his education in Constantinople and became a palace deacon. His History encompasses 959–76 and ...
John VI Kantakouzenos

John VI Kantakouzenos  

Emperor (8 Feb. 1347–3 Dec. 1354 [A. Failler, REB 29 (1971) 293–302]); born ca.1295, died Mistra 15 June 1383.The son, probably posthumous, of a Peloponnesian governor of the aristocratic ...
Silver Stamps

Silver Stamps  

State control marks impressed on some silver objects between the 4th and 8th (?) C. In the early 4th C. such stamps, giving the place of manufacture (e.g., Nikomedeia, Antioch) ...
Pronoia

Pronoia  

Pronoia, literally “forethought,” “care,” or “provision,” was the common Byzantine theological term for divine providence. To speak of imperial pronoia was to liken the emperor’s care for his ...
school of Lysippus

school of Lysippus  

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Overview Page
According to Pliny (1), Naturalis historia 34. 66, Lysippus (2) left three sons and pupils, Laippus (probably Daippus, misreading the initial Δ as Λ), Boedas, and Euthycrates. Elsewhere, he adds ...
Board Games

Board Games  

History of board games in Africa.Africa is associated with two groups of board games, mancala and draughts. Chess is the first board game on record that has been connected ...

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