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Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo

A treaty signed in Guadalupe-Hidalgo on February 2, 1848, to end the Mexican War (1846–48). The United States agreed to pay Mexico $15 million and assume $3 million in adjusted ...

Guadalupe-Hidalgo, Treaty of

Guadalupe-Hidalgo, Treaty of (1848)   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
37 words

...-Hidalgo, Treaty of ( 1848 ) Peace settlement ending the Mexican War . Mexico ceded the present US states of Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, California, Nevada, Utah, and parts of Colorado and Wyoming. The USA paid US$15 million in...

Guadalupe-Hidalgo, Treaty of

Guadalupe-Hidalgo, Treaty of   Reference library

The Oxford Essential Dictionary of the U.S. Military

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

...-Hidalgo, Treaty of a treaty signed in Guadalupe-Hidalgo on February 2, 1848 , to end the Mexican War ( 1846–48 ). The United States agreed to pay Mexico $15 million and assume $3 million in adjusted claims of U.S. citizens. It established a boundary for Texas at the Rio Grande, and the United States annexed Mexico's northern provinces. It included provisions ensuring the civil and property rights of Mexicans in the transferred territories, but the United States subsequently failed to honor...

Guadalupe‐Hidalgo, Treaty of

Guadalupe‐Hidalgo, Treaty of (1848)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to American Military History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...‐Hidalgo, Treaty of ( 1848 ). The treaty that ended the Mexican War with the United States was signed in GuadalupeHidalgo, a suburb of Mexico City, on 2 February 1848 . President James K. Polk had already discharged negotiator Nicholas P. Trist , but the U.S. envoy used his imminent departure to persuade a fragile Mexican provisional government to consent to a substantial loss of territory rather than continuing a disastrous war or risking a more draconian peace. U.S. forces already controlled the capital, the major ports, and the northern half ...

Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo

Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Latinos and Latinas in the United States

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
742 words

... of Guadalupe Hidalgo . The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, legally identified as the Treaty of Peace, Friendship, Limits, and Settlement with the Republic of Mexico, was signed on February 2, 1848, and terminated the U.S. war against the Mexican Republic. The international peace agreement linked the two republics in a contractual relationship. The treaty's twenty-three articles eased war entanglements, such as stopping the “blockading…of Mexican ports,” an exchange of prisoners of war, and geographical boundaries. It also provided Mexican citizens residing in...

Guadalupe-Hidalgo, Treaty of

Guadalupe-Hidalgo, Treaty of   Quick reference

Matthew Kilburn

Dictionary Plus History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
History
Length:
86 words

...Guadalupe-Hidalgo, Treaty of An agreement of 1848 which ended the Mexican War with the US. The treaty was named after the suburb of Mexico City in which it was signed. The US paid $15 million to Mexico and assumed the claims of US citizens against Mexico, in return for which it annexed Mexico’s northern provinces and extended the border of Texas to the Rio Grande. The annexed provinces became the states of California, Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah, and parts of Colorado and Wyoming. Matthew...

Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo

Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo  

A treaty signed in Guadalupe-Hidalgo on February 2, 1848, to end the Mexican War (1846–48). The United States agreed to pay Mexico $15 million and assume $3 million in adjusted ...
Las Gorras Blancas

Las Gorras Blancas  

In 1848 the United States–Mexican War ended with the signing of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. With the ratification of this treaty, areas formerly belonging to Mexico became territories of ...
People v. de la Guerra

People v. de la Guerra  

In People v. de la Guerra, the California Supreme Court held that the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo directly granted U.S. citizenship to those who elected to naturalize, even absent ...
Battle of Mexico City

Battle of Mexico City  

The final campaign of the Mexican War, won by the United States on September 14, 1848. In early 1847, President James K. Polk and Gen. Winfield Scott planned to occupy ...
María Amparo Ruiz De Burton

María Amparo Ruiz De Burton  

(1832–1895),writer. Novelist and playwright María Amparo Ruiz de Burton was born in Loreto, Baja Mexico, sixteen years before the signing of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. She was the ...
Richard Barnes Mason

Richard Barnes Mason  

(1797–1850) U.S. army officer and military governor, born in Fairfax County, Virginia. He received a U.S. Army commission as a second lieutenant of infantry in 1817. He served in the ...
Expansionism

Expansionism  

Expansionism—the desire of nations and empires to annex lands, peoples, or resources belonging to others—is a peculiar characteristic of a world order where boundaries are subject to the ambitions of ...
Mexican War

Mexican War  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
(1846–48) a war that vastly increased U.S. territory and contributed to the sectional crisis. Elected in 1844 on a platform of expansionism, James K. Polk moved quickly to fulfill his ...
Mexico

Mexico  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
Mexico is no longer a one-party state—elections are now fiercely contestedSome have suggested that Mexico's most important geographical feature is the 2,000-mile border it shares with the USA. But ...
Mexican Cession

Mexican Cession   Reference library

The Oxford Essential Dictionary of the U.S. Military

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

...Cession lands relinquished to the United States from Mexico in 1848 . The Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo ceded territory to the United States after the Mexican War ( 1846–48 ). California, Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah, Texas, and parts of Colorado were exchanged for $15 million. The United States also assumed citizens' claims against Mexico as part of the terms of the treaty...

Mexican War

Mexican War (1846–48)   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
87 words

...) War between Mexico and the USA. It broke out following US annexation of Texas ( 1845 ). The Mexicans were swiftly overwhelmed, and a series of US expeditions effected the conquest of the southwest. The war ended when General Winfield Scott , having landed at Vera Cruz in March 1847 , defeated the army of Santa Anna and entered Mexico City on September 8 . In the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo ( 1848 ), Mexico ceded sovereignty over California and New Mexico, as well as Texas north of the Rio...

Gorras Blancas, Las

Gorras Blancas, Las   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Latinos and Latinas in the United States

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
557 words

...ended with the signing of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. With the ratification of this treaty, areas formerly belonging to Mexico became territories of the United States. For Mexicans residing in newly appropriated lands, the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo offered U.S. citizenship. The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo also promised to recognize already existing land grants. Unfortunately not all land grants were recognized. The rights of property ownership were never fully extended to newly annexed Mexican Americans. As a result, a group of Mexicans formed Las...

Mexico City, Battle of

Mexico City, Battle of   Reference library

The Oxford Essential Dictionary of the U.S. Military

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

...of the final campaign of the Mexican War , won by the United States on September 14, 1848 . In early 1847 , President James K. Polk and Gen. Winfield Scott planned to occupy Mexico City in order to force Mexico to concede in the war. Slowed by Mexican troops, as well as disease, Scott's army reached the outskirts of Mexico City in mid August, and after a series of major battles, finally outflanked Gen. Antonio López de Santa Anna 's men. On February 2, 1848 , diplomats signed the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo , which granted the U.S. roughly half of...

Gadsden Purchase

Gadsden Purchase   Reference library

Norman Caulfield

The Oxford Companion to United States History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
367 words

...1854 ). The Gadsden Purchase was a wedge of land acquired by the United States from Mexico in 1854 . Named after James Gadsden ( 1788–1858 ), an American diplomat and railroad entrepreneur, the territory comprised a narrow strip of today's New Mexico and nearly a quarter of southern Arizona. The purchase resulted from disagreements between the United States and Mexico over the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, which ended the Mexican War . Besides defining the U.S.-Mexican border with an inaccurate map, the treaty obliged the United States to restrain...

United States v. Sandoval (1897)

United States v. Sandoval (1897)   Reference library

Guadalupe T. Luna

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Latinos and Latinas in Contemporary Politics, Law, and Social Movements

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics, Law
Length:
662 words

...determination of San Miguel’s “legitimacy” followed from the Court of Private Land Claims, which had already affirmed the pueblo ownership of communal lands. Yet in a decision that has alienated many to this day, the Supreme Court ruled that title to the commons was not vested in the pueblo but remained under the jurisdiction of the United States, which had acquired the lands through the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. Recognizing that several judicial errors tainted the ruling, legal scholars and historians have long joined the protests of the land grant...

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