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Tower of London

Built by William the Conqueror within the south‐east corner of the old Roman walls of London as one of three fortresses intended to secure the city. As London became increasingly important ...

Tower of London

Tower of London   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
56 words

... of London English royal castle in London . Begun by William the Conqueror in 1078 , later monarchs added and extended the Tower. It has served various functions throughout the centuries - residence, arsenal, prison and museum. It is associated especially with the imprisonment and execution (on Tower Hill) of traitors. The crown jewels are held...

Tower of London

Tower of London   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
73 words

... of London The fortress complex on the Thames, begun by *William I ‘the Conqueror’, originated with the building of the White Tower in 1078 , the last addition being made in the 1840s . The Tower has housed a military garrison since nearly its beginning and is the repository for the crown jewels. See also castles, fortifications, and fortresses . Mel Storm J. Charlton , ed., The Tower of London: Its Buildings and Institutions ...

Tower of London

Tower of London ([Places])   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Reference and Allusion (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
119 words

... of London [Places] A fortress in central London, built by William the Conqueror, used as a royal residence and later as a state prison. Famous prisoners include Thomas More, Anne Boleyn, Sir Walter Raleigh, Guy *Fawkes , and Rudolf Hess. See also Princes in the Tower . > Mentioned (especially in the phrase ‘sent to the Tower (of London)’) in the context of treasonable acts, especially committing an offence against the Royal family He continued by explaining how, in the first round of this event, he had run the risk of being sent to the Tower of London...

London, Tower of

London, Tower of   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Medieval Warfare and Military Technology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Military History, Social sciences, Warfare and Defence
Length:
875 words
Illustration(s):
1

..., Tower of London was founded by the Romans in the first century c.e. and by the third century had been enclosed by a defensive wall. After William of Normandy Tower of London. The tower as surveyed in 1597. A. The Middle Tower; B. The tower at the Gate; C. The Bell Tower; D. Beauchamp Tower; E. Develin Tower; F. Flint Tower; G. Bowyar Tower; H. Brick Tower; I. Martin Tower; K. Constable Tower; L. Broad Arrow Tower; M. Salt Tower; N. Well Tower; O. The tower leading to the Iron Gate; P. The tower above the Iron Gate; Q. The Cradle Tower; R. The Lanthorn...

Tower of London

Tower of London   Reference library

Lynda Rollason

The Oxford Companion to British History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
472 words

... of London ( White Tower ) . Built by William the Conqueror within the south-east corner of the old Roman walls of London as one of three fortresses intended to secure the city. As London became increasingly important as the centre both of government and of commerce, the castle was enlarged and updated by successive kings, especially by Edward I and Edward III , until it became a complex concentric fortification. But no royal castle in the Middle Ages was used solely for defence and the Tower became the site of a multitude of offices and departments....

Tower of London

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The Kings and Queens of Britain (2 rev. ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
349 words
Illustration(s):
1

...on his new subjects. The White Tower, core of the Tower of London, was probably not finished until the reign of William ‘Rufus’. In the early 14th cent., the Mint and crown jewels were moved there. Among the dozens of state prisoners were Henry VI, Richard III's nephews, Anne Boleyn, Catherine Howard, Walter Ralegh, Strafford and Laud. Source: www.istockphoto.com On appointment as Constable of the Tower in 1826 , the Duke of Wellington wished to restore its military importance, fearing that the country was on the brink of revolution. This passed, and with...

Tower of London

Tower of London   Quick reference

A Dictionary of British History (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
183 words

... of London ( White Tower ). Built by William the Conqueror within the south‐east corner of the old Roman walls of London as one of three fortresses intended to secure the city. As London became increasingly important as the centre both of government and of commerce, the castle was enlarged and updated by successive kings, especially by Edward I and Edward III , until it became a complex concentric fortification. Even in the later Middle Ages the kings had preferred to reside when in London at their palace at Westminster . Traditionally, however, the...

Tower of London, The

Tower of London, The  

The Oxford Companion to Crime and Mystery Writing

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Subject:
Literature

... of London, The . Begun by William the Conqueror soon after the Norman Conquest of 1066 as a fortress to dominate the city of London , the central keep or stone tower, which gives the building its name, was constructed inside a corner of the city wall but not completed until some time after 1086 . Successive medieval monarchs strengthened the defenses by adding further towers, an inner and outer wall, and a moat to make the tower the chief stronghold of the kingdom. Over the centuries the Tower of London has been by turn a royal residence housing the...

Tower of London

Tower of London   Quick reference

New Oxford American Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
72 words
Tower of London

Tower of London   Quick reference

Oxford Dictionary of English (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
70 words
Tower of London

Tower of London   Reference library

The Canadian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
38 words
Tower of London

Tower of London   Reference library

The New Zealand Oxford Dictionary

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
67 words
Tower of London

Tower of London   Reference library

Australian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
67 words
Tower of London

Tower of London  

Built by William the Conqueror within the south‐east corner of the old Roman walls of London as one of three fortresses intended to secure the city. As London became increasingly important as the ...
Towers Of London

Towers Of London   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Popular Music (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Music
Length:
364 words

...brothers formed and disbanded Brass Monkeys and the Lost Boys, before finally settling on the name Towers Of London in 2004. From the early inception of the Towers Of London they seemed to find trouble wherever they went, with a string of court cases and violence at gigs, only fuelling the hype surrounding the band. Their music was characterised as a mixture of the Sex Pistols and the Clash , with a splash of Guns N’Roses (who they supported on the UK leg of their tour) and New York Dolls thrown in for good measure. With such interest and plaudits for the...

Towers Of London

Towers Of London  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Music
Brothers Dirk Tourette (b. Francis Brannan, Liverpool, Merseyside, England; rhythm guitar) and Donny Tourette (b. Patrick Brannan, 1981, Liverpool, Merseyside, England; vocals) formed this ...
Historic Churches

Historic Churches   Quick reference

David Hey

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,420 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...Towers, in particular, continued to be built in the old fashion. The Gothic style was never completely abandoned and was revived in the 19th century, when new buildings were deliberately designed to look medieval and many old buildings were ‘improved’ with new Gothic features. The use of Classical architecture for parish churches is largely restricted to the later 17th, 18th, and early 19th centuries. After the Fire of London ( 1666 ) Wren and Hawksmoor built a remarkable series of churches, whose designs influenced builders in other towns and in parts of the...

Richard III

Richard III   Reference library

Randall Martin and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,559 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...of York. 3.1 Prince Edward is welcomed to London by the lords and Mayor but misses his absent mother and brother. Against his better judgement, the Cardinal is persuaded to fetch the Duke of York out of sanctuary. The young princes reluctantly submit to Gloucester’s advice to lodge temporarily in the Tower. Catesby is sent to find out Hastings’s opinion about the idea of Gloucester becoming king. Gloucester promises Buckingham the earldom of Hereford for his support after he is crowned. 3.2 Lord Stanley’s messenger reports to Hastings his master’s dreams of...

Domestic Buildings

Domestic Buildings   Quick reference

Malcolm Airs

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
6,135 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...series of essays in London Suburbs ( 1999 ). The English Terraced House ( 1982 ) is comprehensively covered by Stefan Muthesius . J. N. Tarn , Five Per Cent Philanthropy ( 1973 ), describes the measures taken to provide cheap housing for the working classes in urban areas between 1840 and 1914 , and the story is taken up to the very recent past in Miles Glendenning and Stefan Muthesius, Tower Block: Modern Public Housing in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland ( 1994 ). There is probably more literature on the housing of London than for...

Richard Duke of York

Richard Duke of York   Reference library

Randall Martin, Will Sharpe, and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,705 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...of her husband’s lands. She insists upon marriage, to which he agrees. His choice of a commoner astonishes George, newly elevated Duke of Clarence, and Richard, Duke of Gloucester. Henry is reported captured and sent to the Tower. Alone on stage, Gloucester reveals his contempt for Edward and burning ambitions for the crown. Freed from ethical responsibility by his physical deformities, Gloucester turns to role-playing and Machiavellian policy to achieve his goals. 3.3 Margaret seeks the French King’s aid. Warwick begins to negotiate the marriage of the...

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