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Thomas Archer

 (c.1668–1743) English architect, who became a Commissioner for building the Fifty New Churches under the 1711 Act. While he never obtained any official architectural post, he ...

Archer, Thomas

Archer, Thomas   Reference library

Patrick Taylor

The Oxford Companion to the Garden

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

..., Thomas ( c .1668–1743 ), English architect, country gentleman, and Member of Parliament from Warwickshire. Between 1691 and 1695 he travelled in Europe, to the Low Countries, Germany, Austria, and, in particular, Italy, where he fell under the spell of baroque architecture. He designed churches, country and town houses, and garden buildings. Among the latter are the Cascade House ( 1702 ) at Chatsworth and the splendid domed garden pavilion ( 1709–11 ) for Wrest Park . Patrick...

Archer, Thomas

Archer, Thomas (1668–1743)   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Architecture (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2021
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
141 words

..., Thomas ( c. 1668–1743 ) English architect , who made the Grand Tour and absorbed lessons from works of Bernini and Borromini . His reputation rests upon a handful of accomplished Baroque buildings, including the north front of, and cascade-house at, Chatsworth, Derbys. (1704–5), the garden-pavilion at Wrest Park, Beds. (1709–11), and three churches (St Philip, Birmingham (now the Cathedral of 1710–15), St Paul, Deptford (1713–30), and St John, Smith Square, Westminster (1713–28)). The last-named building (damaged in the 1939–45 war), has...

Archer, Thomas

Archer, Thomas (c.1668–1743)   Reference library

Anthony Quiney

The Oxford Companion to Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
177 words

..., Thomas ( c .1668–1743 ) English architect , who became a Commissioner for building the Fifty New Churches under the 1711 Act. While he never obtained any official architectural post, he nevertheless built up a practice as an amateur, all the while depending on estates in London and the country for an income. His uncompromisingly Baroque architectural style is closer to Italian practice than the more national style of his famed contemporaries Hawksmoor and Vanbrugh . His Cascade House at Chatsworth House, Derbyshire ( 1702 ), where he also designed...

Thomas Archer

Thomas Archer  

Reference type:
Overview Page
 (c.1668–1743) English architect, who became a Commissioner for building the Fifty New Churches under the 1711 Act.While he never obtained any official architectural post, he nevertheless built up a ...
Britain and America: A Common Heritage

Britain and America: A Common Heritage   Quick reference

George Redmonds

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,879 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

... 1775 on board the ship Jenny . Fortunately, Stephen Archer's atlas is not selective in its approach and his county map tells us that there were just 77 people called Colpitts in 1881 . Of these, 74 were living in the adjoining counties of Durham and Northumberland and a very few obvious variants were found there and in North Yorkshire, the county immediately to the south. The Tees is the river that separates the historic counties of Yorkshire and Durham, and it was in the valley of the Tees that Thomas and Stephen Colpottys were living in 1473 . I have...

Design

Design   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
6,178 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

... George Hepplewhite 's The Cabinet Maker and Upholsterer's Guide , published after his death by his wife in successive editions of 1788 , 1789 , and 1794 , was the first major furniture pattern book to appear after the third edition of Thomas Chippendale 's Director in 1762 , and was heavily dependent on Adam. Thomas Sheraton 's ( 1751–1806 ) The Cabinet-Maker and Upholsterer's Drawing Book , published in parts between 1791 and 1794 (with a second edition in 1794 and a third in 1802 ), attracted 700 subscribers, including cabinet-makers,...

Architecture

Architecture   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
4,949 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...cultural complex along the newly embanked Thames River; in Edinburgh, Robert *Adam 's Register House ( 1774–92 ); and in Dublin, Thomas Cooley and James *Gandon 's Four Courts judicial complex ( 1786–1802 ), new Customs House ( 1781–91 ), and Parliament House additions ( 1784–7 ). More typically, for a nation habitually suspicious of centralized bureaucracy, government building was focused on the county level, for example Thomas *Harrison 's administrative complexes at Chester ( 1788–1822 ) and Lancaster ( 1788–99 ). There was also a burst of *prison...

Domestic Buildings

Domestic Buildings   Quick reference

Malcolm Airs

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
6,135 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

... by Michael Holmes under the title The Country House Described . This is the essential starting point for researching the history of an individual country house. Another indispensable index is the monumental The Literature of British Domestic Architecture, 1715–1842 by John Archer ( 1985 ), which catalogues all the printed books containing original designs for residential structures published in the period between Colen Campbell's first volume of Vitruvius Britannicus ( 1715 ) and the first additional supplement of J. C. Loudon , Encyclopedia of...

39 The History of the Book in the Indian Subcontinent

39 The History of the Book in the Indian Subcontinent   Reference library

Abhijit Gupta

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
10,070 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...in Calcutta and Benares (Varanasi) were able print books in the Nepali language as well. Printing came to Lucknow in 1817 when the Matba-i Sultani, or Royal Press, was established; but printing did not begin in earnest until the coming of lithography in 1830 . That year, Henry Archer, superintendent of the Asiatic Lithographic Company in Kanpur, was invited to set up a press in Lucknow. In the beginning, the trade was not commercial, in the sense that books were usually published to an author’s or a patron’s order. Nevertheless, a score or so of lithographic...

Job

Job   Reference library

James L. Crenshaw and James L. Crenshaw

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
28,334 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...in the same way they did not succeed as physicians. He claims that he could do better than they, although in his present state speaking out brings no solace. He imagines that God has singled out Job as his personal target, coming against him with exceptional brutality. His archers hit their mark, and God disembowels the fallen Job. At 16:15 Job thinks of his mourning as a permanent condition, for it seems as though he has sewn sackcloth to his skin. Such material was worn during mourning and periods of grief associated with repentance and calling upon...

Proverbs

Proverbs   Reference library

K. T. Aitken and K. T Aitken

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
20,819 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...( v. 6 ). Instead of receiving the help of their legs, it is like cutting off one's own legs and will have harmful consequences. While the text of v. 10 is difficult, it too appears to warn of the dangers of employing a fool, comparing the damage the fool will do to that of an archer firing arrows indiscriminately. Both vv. 7 and 9 make the point that the fool is incapable of the effective use of proverbs. The proverb will invariably be misapplied or mistimed, and fall ‘limp’ to the ground. The imagery of v. 9 is less clear. The rendering of the NRSV...

1 & 2 Samuel

1 & 2 Samuel   Reference library

Gwilym H. Jones, Gwilym H. Jones, and Gwilym H. Jones

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
44,450 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...killed Saul, and as proof presents the king's crown and armlet to David. There is no suggestion that Saul committed suicide; his ‘leaning on his spear’ ( v. 6 ) was no more than an attempt to support himself. Moreover, Saul was overtaken by ‘chariots and horsemen’ ( v. 6 ), not ‘archers’ as in 31:3 ; there is no mention of an armour-bearer in this account, and it mentions only Jonathan of the three sons killed. Of the various solutions offered the most likely explanation of the discrepancy is that the Amalekite was lying in order to gain favour with David. This...

Archer Family

Archer Family  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
Included the brothers Charles (1813–62), John (1814–57), David (1816–1900), William (1818–96), Archibald (1820–1902), Thomas (1823–1905) and Colin (1832–1921), who were all involved in pioneering ...
Perfect Crime

Perfect Crime  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(1987),a thriller by Warren Manzi. [47th Street Theatre, still running.] Author and psychiatrist Margaret Thorne Brent (Cathy Russell) and her psychiatrist husband, Harrison (Manzi), are interviewed ...
Kiss and Tell

Kiss and Tell  

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Overview Page
(1943),a comedy by F. Hugh Herbert. [Biltmore Theatre, 957 perf.] The Archers and the Pringles have been feuding, especially since they caught their teenage daughters, Corliss Archer (Joan Caulfield) ...
Borromini capital

Borromini capital  

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Overview Page
Type of Composite capital with incurving volutes used by the Bastards at Blandford Forum, Dorset, in the 1730s, and by Thomas Archer in the 1720s. It was derived from a capital favoured by Borromini.
Sir Martin Archer Shee

Sir Martin Archer Shee  

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(b Dublin, 20 Dec. 1769; d Brighton, 19 Aug. 1850).Irish portrait painter and writer on art, active from 1788 in London. There he became second only to Lawrence as ...
Woolmers

Woolmers  

Tasmania, Australia, is one of a select number of fine 19th-century Tasmanian gardens in which the layout and detailing survives largely intact. The site was granted to Thomas Archer in ...
Arthur Bingham Walkley

Arthur Bingham Walkley  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(1855–1926),English dramatic critic, whom Shaw satirized as Mr Trotter in Fanny's First Play (1911). He wrote for a number of papers before becoming dramatic critic of The Times in ...
Bastard Brothers

Bastard Brothers  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(John (1688–1770) and William (c. 1689–1766). English architect-builders who worked in Dorset, and rebuilt Blandford Forum in a vernacular Baroque style from 1731 after that town had been destroyed ...

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