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Test Act

Subject: History

Laws that made the holding of public office in Britain conditional upon subscribing to the established religion. Although Scotland imposed such a law in 1567, the harsh laws against ...

Test Act

Test Act   Quick reference

A Dictionary of British History (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
99 words

... Act , 1673 . Usually linked to the Corporation Act , but a later addition to the code of laws excluding non‐members of the Church of England from public office (25 Car. II c. 2). It required all office‐holders under the crown, including MPs, to receive communion according to the rites of the Church of England at least once a year, and to make a declaration against transubstantiation. This was aimed at catholics and the repeal of the Test Act was the principal objective of the successful catholic emancipation campaign led by Daniel O'Connell in the late...

Test Act

Test Act   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
55 words

... Act . The Popish Recusants Act 1672 , passed in 1673 , required all holders of office under the Crown to receive Communion according to the usage of the C of E, to take the Oaths of Supremacy and Allegiance to the Sovereign, and to make the Declaration against Transubstantiation. It remained in force until 1829...

Test Act

Test Act (1673)   Reference library

Judith Champ

The Oxford Companion to British History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
115 words

... Act , 1673 . Usually linked to the Corporation Act , but a later addition to the code of laws excluding non-members of the Church of England from public office (25 Car. II c .2). It required all office-holders under the crown, including MPs, to receive communion according to the rites of the Church of England at least once a year. They were also required to take oaths of supremacy and allegiance to the crown and to make a declaration against transubstantiation. This was aimed more particularly at recusant catholics and the repeal of the Test Act was the...

Test Act

Test Act   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 rev. ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
120 words

...Test Act . The Popish Recusants Act 1672 , passed in 1673 , requiring all holders of office under the Crown ( inter alia ) to receive the sacrament of the Eucharist acc. to the usage of the C of E, to take the Oaths of Supremacy and Allegiance to the King, and to make the Declaration against Transubstantiation . Among its first effects was the resignation by James (II) , Duke of York, of his post of Lord High Admiral. The Act was in force until the Roman Catholic Relief Act 1829 was passed, and it was not finally repealed until 1863 . Text in Gee...

Test Act

Test Act noun   Quick reference

Oxford Dictionary of English (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
110 words
Test Act

Test Act  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
Laws that made the holding of public office in Britain conditional upon subscribing to the established religion. Although Scotland imposed such a law in 1567, the harsh laws against recusants in ...
Universities Tests Act 1871

Universities Tests Act 1871   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 rev. ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
50 words

...Universities Tests Act 1871 . By this Act it was laid down that no person taking any degree at Oxford , Cambridge or Durham University other than a degree in divinity, holding lay academical or collegiate office, should henceforward be required to subscribe any article or formulary of...

Universities Tests Act 1871

Universities Tests Act 1871  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
By this Act it was laid down that no person taking any degree at Oxford, Cambridge or Durham University other than a degree in divinity, holding lay academical or collegiate ...
Pericles

Pericles   Reference library

Sonia Massai and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,543 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...the original quarto does not divide the play into acts (and is followed in this respect by the Oxford edition), later editions conventionally break it up into five, starting Act 2 at Scene 5 (after the Antioch incidents and the relief of Tarsus), Act 3 at Scene 10 (after the wedding of Pericles and Thaisa), Act 4 at Scene 15 (after the storm and its immediate consequences), and Act 5 at Scene 20 (after Marina’s release from the brothel). A considerable amount of effort has gone into establishing the origins of Wilkins’s 1608 The Painful Adventures . The...

Religion

Religion   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,549 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...established in the early eighteenth century to protect the rights of Dissenters and, if possible, to advance them. The deputies did little more than hold ground already taken, until in 1813 they obtained an Act extending toleration to Unitarians, which had been denied under the Act of 1689 . They also played an important part in the repeal of the Test and Corporation Acts in 1828 , which removed the seventeenth-century impediments to participation of Dissenting laymen in national and local government. But by that time Unitarian Dissenting leadership was...

The Winter’s Tale

The Winter’s Tale   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Will Sharpe, and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,428 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...Winter’s Tale Although it clearly belongs among the late romances—with its artful structure and almost insolent mastery of complex narrative and characterization— The Winter’s Tale is difficult to date with precision. A dance of satyrs in Act 4 (4.4.340–1) seems to be borrowed from Ben Jonson ’s Masque of Oberon , acted at court on 1 January 1611 , but its irrelevance there and the awkwardness with which it is introduced by the surrounding dialogue suggests that this may be a late interpolation, indicating that the play was written before Jonson’s masque...

Measure for Measure

Measure for Measure   Reference library

Sonia Massai and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,564 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...the Boy’s song, ‘Take, O take those lips away’, at the beginning of Act 4 may be a late interpolation from Fletcher ’s Rollo, Duke of Normandy ( 1616–19 ), and the Duke’s subsequent monologue ‘O place and greatness’ (too short to allow Isabella to inform Mariana about the Duke’s plans) was probably transposed by the later adapter responsible for introducing the act division with the original monologue, ‘He who the sword of heaven will bear’, which is longer and more suitable as an act-break. More tampering must have occurred in 1.2, where the news of...

Empire

Empire   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
4,298 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...suspicions both of non-Christian native peoples and of European settlers outside the Anglican fold. The imperial government also had to reckon with the increasingly well- organized political voice of Protestant Dissent both at home and abroad—particularly after the Repeal of the Test Act in 1828 removed from Dissenters any restriction on their involvement in the political life of the nation [ see *toleration ]. Furthermore, the advancement of *religion [10] by state power was difficult to combine with *Whig traditions of promoting at least some measure of...

Troilus and Cressida

Troilus and Cressida   Reference library

Michael Dobson and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,065 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...in the Stationers’ Register in February 1603 , and must have been written after 1598 , when one of its sources, George Chapman ’s Seven Books of the Iliads of Homer , was published: its armed Prologue is probably an allusion to Ben Jonson ’s Poetaster , acted in 1601 , and since metrical tests place it after Hamlet and Twelfth Night but before Measure for Measure and Othello its likeliest date of composition is 1602 . Dorothy Tutin as Cressida, with Max Adrian as Pandarus, in the John Barton–Peter Hall Troilus and Cressida , RSC, 1960: one...

Henry VI Part 1

Henry VI Part 1   Reference library

Randall Martin and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,505 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...of Winchester. 1.2 The French are beaten back after trying to disperse the English siege of Orléans. Joan la Pucelle presents herself as a holy peasant maid divinely destined to liberate France; she recognizes Charles the Dauphin without ever having seen him, and defeats him in a test of combat. 1.3 A violent brawl between Gloucester, Winchester, and their men is dispersed by the Mayor of London. 1.4 The Master Gunner of Orléans fires upon a tower from where Talbot and the English have surveyed the French defences. Salisbury is mortally wounded. 1.5–6 Joan...

Education

Education   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,267 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...in England. In the century following the *Toleration Act of 1689 more than seventy of these institutions were in operation for varying periods of time and in various spots around London or in the provinces. There remained some insecurity in the legal position of Dissenters, with respect to education, but this was brought to an end in 1779 by an act of parliament formally ratifying their right to follow the teaching profession. The academies as a rule prescribed no exclusionary religious tests, and managed to attract a cross-section of pupils from...

The Merry Wives of Windsor

The Merry Wives of Windsor   Reference library

Michael Dobson and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,720 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...panic. Evans and the fairies appear, with Anne dressed as a fairy and Mistress Quickly as the fairy queen: Sir John hides, convinced he is witnessing fairy revels and in grave danger, as they recite verses blessing Windsor and the Garter emblems. The fairies find Sir John, testing his purity with lighted tapers, then pinching him as a punishment for his sins (to the song ‘Fie on sinful luxury…’): meanwhile Caius steals away with a fairy in green, Slender with one in white, and Anne leaves with Fenton. The pretended fairies disperse at a sound of hunters,...

Timon of Athens

Timon of Athens   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Will Sharpe, and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,245 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...pleads with the senators for the life of one of his soldiers, who has committed manslaughter, and grows so angry at their refusal that they banish him: he vows to rally his troops and attack Athens in revenge. 3.7 Timon’s friends, convinced his apparent bankruptcy must have been a test of their loyalty, gather eagerly for the feast. Covered dishes are brought in: Timon recites a satirical grace before their lids are lifted, revealing only stones in lukewarm water. He rants at his guests and beats them, vowing eternal misanthropy. 4.1 Outside Athens Timon curses...

Theatre

Theatre   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,088 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...the courtiers Davenant and Killigrew, and the Stage Licensing Act of 1737 . The patents subsequently became the property of successive owners of Covent Garden and Drury Lane playhouses, known as the major or patent theatres, who used them to justify a duopoly over spoken drama in the metropolis. Any challenge to the patent theatres was interpreted by their owners as a threat to the security of property rights in general and as an attack on the authority of the *monarch . The 1737 Licensing Act reinforced the power of Covent Garden and Drury Lane by...

Psychology

Psychology   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,151 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...often leads to another observation, that the agent may apply a theory to explain them, and that it in turn can be tested by new observations and experiments. Thus reflection on our mental operations can set this process of discovery in train, and Jeffrey was mistaken in denying it. However, neither he nor Stewart considered the problem of how the observations produced by introspecting were to become parts of theories that could themselves be tested by introspection—or by any other means. New theories create new subjects of consciousness for introspection and...

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