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Synesius

Subject: Religion

(c.370–c.413), Bp. of Ptolemais. A native of Cyrene, he was descended from an ancient family. In 403/4 he married a Christian. Having won the confidence of his fellow-countrymen ...

Synesius

Synesius (370–414)   Reference library

David Natal

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

.... Synesius’ 156 letters contain abundant information about his troubled episcopacy. In ep . 105, written at the moment of his episcopal election, Synesius restates his Neoplatonist philosophy and his refusal to give up his wife. In the next years Synesius also faced the death of his wife and three sons ( epp. 70 and 89), a problematic relationship with Andronicus, the Praeses of Libya Superior , who was excommunicated by Synesius for not respecting church asylum ( epp . 41–2), and invasions by nomads ( ep . 67, Catastases ). Synesius’ other...

Synesius

Synesius (c.370–c.413)   Reference library

Mark Edwards

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
585 words

...di Sinesio (Temi et Testi, 16; 1969). Eng. tr. of Letters by A. FitzGerald (London, 1926); of Essays and Hymns by A. FitzGerald (2 vols, London, 1930). In Praise of Baldness , tr. G. Kendal (1985). On Synesius’ life and work: G. Grützmacher (Leipzig, 1913). C. Lacombrade , Synésius de Cyrène (Paris, 1951). J. Bregman , Synesius of Cyrene (Berkeley, etc., and London, 1982). S. Vollenweider (Forschungen zur Kirchen- und Dogmengeschichte, 35; 1985). D. Roques (Études d’Antiquités Africaines, 1987). B.-A. Roos and T. Schmitt ...

Synesius

Synesius (c.370–c.413)   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
125 words

... ( c. 370– c. 413 ), Bp. of Ptolemais. A native of Cyrene, he was descended from an ancient family. In 403/4 he married a Christian. Having won the confidence of his fellow-countrymen by a successful embassy to the Imperial court, c. 410 he was chosen Bp. of Ptolemais in Cyrenaica. After some hesitation, he was consecrated, without engaging to give up either his wife or his philosophical doctrines. Before he became a bishop he wrote a number of philosophical treatises, none of which betrays anything distinctively Christian. He also wrote nine hymns;...

Synesius

Synesius (c.ad 370–413)(of Cyrene)   Reference library

Peter John Heather

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
284 words

... of Cyrene , c. ad 370–413 , Christian Neoplatonist ( See neoplatonism ) and bishop of Ptolemais ( see pentapolis ) 410–13 . A pupil of Hypatia at Alexandria, he tended towards oratory and poetry. Nine hymns, 156 letters, and a series of discourses are extant. Of the latter, the Dion is a powerful attack on the contemporary decline of humane culture, whether in the form of exaggerated Christian asceticism or superstitious pagan theurgy . He shared Neoplatonic interest in the occult (e.g. the Chaldaean oracles) and wrote on divination by...

Synesius of Cyrene

Synesius of Cyrene ((Synesios; c. 370–after 413 CE))   Reference library

eric fournier

Dictionary of African Biography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
1,385 words

...that Synesius visited Athens on his way to the imperial court. The purpose of this trip was to bring the aurum coronarium (a tax disguised as a gift for the accession of a new emperor and sometimes as a regular contribution) from the city of Cyrene. Such a ceremonial event involved delivering a speech to the emperor, and therefore the selection of Synesius by his fellow citizens indicates they held him in great esteem. It is, however, highly doubtful that Synesius pronounced his Peri basileías in front of the emperor. Indeed, Synesius’s text is...

Synesius

Synesius  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(c.370–c.413), Bp. of Ptolemais. A native of Cyrene, he was descended from an ancient family. In 403/4 he married a Christian. Having won the confidence of his fellow-countrymen by a successful ...
Tribigild

Tribigild  

(Τιρβίγιλλος, Τριγίβιλδος), a Goth and comes rei militaris in the East; died Thrace ca.400.He was a relative of Gainas and commanded barbarian troops settled in Phrygia. After a visit ...
Dionysius Petavius

Dionysius Petavius  

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Religion
(1583–1652), Denis Pétau, Jesuit historian and theologian. His Opus de Doctrina Temporum (1627) was a fundamental contribution to the study of ancient chronology. He also issued notable editions of ...
Poetry, Ecclesiastical

Poetry, Ecclesiastical  

Verse used during the liturgy or in religious contexts. Much of the liturgy in the Orthodox church consists of hymns; some are brief, such as stichera and troparia, meditations inserted ...
Kamariotes, Matthew

Kamariotes, Matthew  

Writer, scribe, and teacher; born Thessalonike, died Constantinople 1490. Kamariotes (Καμαριώτης) came to Constantinople during the final years of the Palaiologan dynasty and studied with Gennadios ...
Berenice

Berenice  

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The name of several Ptolemaic dynastic foundations. Among the best known are:(a) Berenice (mod. Benghazi), the westernmost Cyrenaican city, founded in the mid-3rd cent. bc (exact date and ...
Epistolography

Epistolography  

Or the art of writing letters, a genre of Byz. literature akin to rhetoric, popular with the intellectual elite. Copious examples survive from all periods, in more than 150 published ...
Thomas Magister

Thomas Magister  

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(Theodulos in religion) of Thessalonica was the secretary of the Byzantine emperor Andronicus II (ad 1282–1328), but withdrew to a monastery, where he devoted himself to scholarship.Works1. Ecloga ...
Cyrenaica

Cyrenaica  

(Κυρήνη). The Roman province of Cyrenaica comprised the plateau of Djebel Akhdar on the east coast of Libya. Under Diocletian it was divided into two provinces: Libya Superior or Pentapolis ...
Anacreontics

Anacreontics  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
[ă‐nayk‐ri‐on‐tiks]Verses resembling, either metrically or in subject matter, those of the Greek poet Anacreon (6th century bce) or of his later imitators in the collection known as the Anacreontea. ...
Pentapolis

Pentapolis  

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(African), the five Greek cities of central Roman Cyrenaica (the northern Gebel Akhdar and its coastal fringe), Cyrene (Shahat), with (from east to west) Apollonia or Sozusa in late antiquity ...
foreigners

foreigners  

(ξένοι, also ethnikoi) were equated in the late Roman Empire with barbarians since it was assumed that the empire encompassed the entire civilized world, the oikoumene. Foreigners were either direct ...
Stephanus

Stephanus  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
A family of scholar-printers.Robert Estienne (1503–59), Printer to Francis I, King of France, is famous for his Thesaurus Linguae Latinae (1532) and for his editions of the Bible, including the OT in ...
women in philosophy

women in philosophy  

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Overview Page
Are recorded in antiquity, though extant writings are few, and there is controversy over dating and authorship of texts. Most of the women whom ancient sources identify as philosophers are associated ...
Theophilus

Theophilus  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(d. 412), Patr. of Alexandria from 385. In the early years of his patriarchate he took an active part in suppressing the remnants of paganism in the city. Originally a supporter of Origenism, he ...

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