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Sohrab and Rustum

Subject: Literature

A poem by M. Arnold, published 1853. The story is taken from Firdausi's Persian epic. It recounts, in blank verse adorned by epic similes, the fatal outcome of Sohrab's search for his ...

‘Sohrab and Rustum’

‘Sohrab and Rustum’   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Literature
Length:
83 words

...Sohrab and Rustum’ A poem by Matthew Arnold , published 1853 . The story is taken from Firdausī 's Persian epic . It recounts the fatal outcome of Sohrab's search for his father Rustum, the leader of the Persian forces. Rustum (who believes his own child to be a girl) accepts the challenge of Sohrab, now leader of the Tartars: the two meet in single combat, at first unaware of one another's identity, which is confirmed only when Sohrab has been mortally...

‘Sohrab and Rustum’

‘Sohrab and Rustum’   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to English Literature (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature
Length:
106 words

...Sohrab and Rustum’ A poem by Matthew Arnold , published 1853 . The story is taken from Firdausī 's Persian epic , via a French translation by Jules Mohl in Le Livre des rois ( 1838–76 ). It recounts, in blank verse adorned by epic similes , the fatal outcome of Sohrab's search for his father Rustum, the leader of the Persian forces. Rustum (who believes his own child to be a girl) accepts the challenge of Sohrab, now leader of the Tartars: the two meet in single combat, at first unaware of one another's identity, which is confirmed only when Sohrab...

Sohrab and Rustum

Sohrab and Rustum  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
A poem by M. Arnold, published 1853. The story is taken from Firdausi's Persian epic. It recounts, in blank verse adorned by epic similes, the fatal outcome of Sohrab's search for his father Rustum, ...
Balder Dead

Balder Dead  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
Long blank verse poem by Matthew Arnold, published in 1855. It develops, like *‘Sohrab and Rustum’, from Arnold's argument in the ‘Preface’ to his Poems (1853) that action of permanent ...
Firdawsi

Firdawsi  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(d. ca. 1020)National poet of Iran. Born, died, and buried in Tus, northeastern Iran. Most famous for his epic story of Persian kings and dynasties, Shahnameh (Book of kings). Although there is a ...
Aided Oenfhir Aífe

Aided Oenfhir Aífe  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
[Ir., The Tragic Death of Aífe's Only Son; also The Tragic Death of Connla].A short foretale of the Táin Bó Cuailnge [Cattle Raid of Cooley], dealing with Cúchulainn's's unwitting killing of his own ...
Matthew Arnold

Matthew Arnold  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1822–88),English poet, critic, and educator, visited the U.S. in 1883 and again in 1886, at which times he delivered the lectures collected in Discourses in America (1885) and gathered the ...
Balder Dead

Balder Dead   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to English Literature (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature
Length:
105 words

...Dead Long blank verse poem by Matthew Arnold , published in 1855 . It develops, like ‘Sohrab and Rustum’ , from Arnold's argument in the ‘Preface’ to his Poems ( 1853 ) that action of permanent human interest should be at the centre of poetry. Here, Arnold retells the northern myth of the god Balder, maliciously slain and then confined to the underworld. Attempts to restore him to life fail and he remains in the murky realm of ghosts until the apocalypse. The narrative, an important instance of the northern Prose Edda 's reception among Victorian...

epyllion

epyllion   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... and/or style but not in length. The term dates from the 19th century, when it was applied to certain shorter narrative poems in Greek and Latin, usually dealing with a mythological love story in an elaborately digressive and allusive manner, as in Catullus’ poem on Peleus and Thetis. The nearest equivalents in English poetry are the Elizabethan erotic narratives such as Marlowe ’s Hero and Leander ( 1598 ) and Shakespeare ’s Venus and Adonis ( 1593 ), although the term has also been applied to later non-erotic works including Arnold ’s Sohrab and...

Firdausī (Ferdosi), Abū l‐Qāsim

Firdausī (Ferdosi), Abū l‐Qāsim (940–1020)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to English Literature (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature
Length:
184 words

...translations into English from 1785 (by Joseph Champion ) to the present day (by Dick Davis ), almost all in abbreviated form. However, the epic is known to English readers principally through Matthew Arnold 's telling of one of its many vivid incidents, the story of ‘Sohrab and Rustum’...

Firdausī (Ferdosi), Abū l‐Qāsim

Firdausī (Ferdosi), Abū l‐Qāsim (c.940–1020)   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Literature
Length:
183 words

...into English from 1785 (by Joseph Champion ) to the 21 st century (by Dick Davis ), almost all in abbreviated form. However, the epic is known to English readers principally through Matthew Arnold 's telling of one of its many vivid incidents, the story of ‘Sohrab and Rustum’...

Arnold, Matthew

Arnold, Matthew (1822–88)   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Literature
Length:
301 words

... appeared, anonymously, in 1852 , and in 1853 a volume of poems containing ‘Sohrab and Rustum’ , ‘The Scholar‐Gipsy’ , and ‘Memorial Verses to Wordsworth’ (who had been a friend of the Arnolds). Arnold's preface discusses the problems of writing poetry in an ‘age wanting in moral grandeur’. He published Poems, Second Series ( 1855 ); Merope, a Tragedy ( 1858 ); and New Poems , ( 1867 ), but turned increasingly to prose, writing essays on literary, educational, and social topics which greatly influenced writers as diverse as Max Weber ( 1864–1920 ), ...

Hildebrandslied

Hildebrandslied   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to German Literature (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
397 words

...and is supposed to have originated in the 7th c., combining a widely disseminated legend (cf. Matthew Arnold's Sohrab and Rustum ) with a known personality of the recent past ( Dietrich von Bern , see Dietrichsage ). The Hildebrandslied is basically Bavarian but has been adapted for a northern audience whose language was Low German. Even so the text is corrupt, and the attribution of some of the lines uncertain. The MS. represents a copy made c. 810 by two monks, probably in Fulda, of this adaptation. The language is philologically problematical, and...

Aided Óenfhir Aífe

Aided Óenfhir Aífe   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...of Sohrab and Rustum (folk motif: N731.2). The men of Ulster were assembled when they saw a boy coming on the sea in a boat of bronze with gilded oars. The men were awe-struck at the boy's powers to make birds do his will. They sent two champions to challenge him, but he defied them both. Only Cúchulainn seemed equal to the task. As he was summoned, his then wife Emer begged him not to go because she said that the boy was the son of Cúchulainn's earlier encounter with Aífe , and thus his only son. The hero disparaged such womanish talk and said that...

Arnold, Matthew

Arnold, Matthew (1822–88)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to English Literature (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature
Length:
687 words

...How. In 1853 appeared a volume of poems containing extracts from the earlier books, andSohrab and Rustum’ , ‘The Scholar‐Gipsy’ , ‘Memorial Verses to Wordsworth’ (who had been a friend of the Arnolds), and ‘Stanzas in Memory of the Author of “Obermann”’, which show how Arnold had been affected by Senancour 's novel and by the mal du siècle of other European writers. Arnold's preface discusses the problems of writing poetry in an ‘age wanting in moral grandeur’ and his reason for repudiating Empedocles on Etna as insufficiently ennobling. Poems,...

Arnold, Matthew

Arnold, Matthew (1822–88)   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 rev. ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
562 words

...), poet and literary critic . He was the eldest son of T. Arnold (q.v.). Born at Laleham, Surrey, he was educated at Winchester , Rugby, and Balliol College, Oxford , where he won the Newdigate Prize with his poem Cromwell ( 1843 ). In 1845 he was elected a Fellow of Oriel College; from 1847 to 1851 he was private secretary to Lord Lansdowne; and from 1851 to 1883 a Government Inspector of Schools. From 1857 to 1867 he was also Professor of Poetry at Oxford. In 1853 he published his Poems (including ‘Sohrab and Rustumand ‘The Scholar...

Jones, William

Jones, William (1746–94)   Reference library

The Continuum Encyclopedia of British Philosophy

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
2,247 words

...major Asian writers and comparing Firdausi 's Sháhnáma to the Iliad , and Kālidāsa to Shakespeare. (This process would lead a century later to Matthew Arnold 's Sohrab and Rustum and to Edward FitzGerald 's Rubáiyát .) Jones’ Poems, Consisting Chiefly of Translations from the Asiatick Languages ( 1772 ) popularized the Oriental dream-world of pleasure and proposed, in a grand plan to improve cultures that would underpin the later concepts of comparative and world literature, that scholars translate great Arabic and Persian works. His Appendix...

Rustam

Rustam   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

... or Rustum The Persian hercules , the son of Zal , Prince of Sedjistan, famous for his victory over the white dragon Asdeev. His combat for two days with Prince Isfendiar is a favourite subject with the Persian poets. Matthew Arnold ’s poem ‘Sohrab and Rustum’ ( 1853 ) gives an account of Rustam fighting with and killing his son Sohrab...

Matthew Arnold

Matthew Arnold (1822–88)   Quick reference

Oxford Essential Quotations (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
843 words

...upon the lips of dying men. ‘Sohrab and Rustum’ (1853) l. 656 truth sits upon the lips lips of dying men lips of dying men Wandering between two worlds, one dead, The other powerless to be born. ‘Stanzas from the Grande Chartreuse’ (1855) l. 85 wandering between two worlds Wandering between two worlds powerless to be born powerless to be born And that sweet City with her dreaming spires, She needs not June for beauty's heightening. of Oxford ‘Thyrsis’ (1866) l. 19 dreaming spires dreaming spires Who saw life steadily, and saw it whole. of Sophocles...

Matthew Arnold

Matthew Arnold (1822–88)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
3,446 words

...didst the stars and sunbeams know didst the stars and sunbeams know self-schooled , self-scanned tread on earth unguessed at tread on Earth unguessed at Truth sits upon the lips of dying men. ‘Sohrab and Rustum’ (1853) l. 656 truth sits upon the lips lips of dying men lips of dying men But the majestic river floated on, Out of the mist and hum of that low land, Into the frosty starlight. ‘Sohrab and Rustum’ (1853) l. 875 majestic river mist and hum frosty starlight frosty starlight The longed-for dash of waves is heard, and wide His luminous...

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