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Shall I die

A lyric in nine stanzas of ten lines each, ascribed to William Shakespeare in a Bodleian Library manuscript collection of poems which dates probably from the late 1630s. Another, ...

‘Shall I die’

‘Shall I die’   Reference library

Stanley Wells

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...Shall I die’ , a love poem (headed ‘A Song’ in the Oxford edition) of nine ten-line stanzas ascribed to ‘William Shakespeare’ in a manuscript collection of poems probably assembled in the late 1630s, now in the Bodleian Library . This is the only contemporary clue to its authorship. Another, unattributed version survives in a manuscript at Yale. Written in a verse form not found elsewhere in the period but resembling lines spoken by Robin Goodfellow in A Midsummer Night’s Dream (3.2.36–46), it has a demanding rhyme-scheme which creates the impression of a...

‘Shall I die?’

‘Shall I die?’   Quick reference

An A-Z Guide to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...Shall I die?’ A lyric in nine stanzas of ten lines each, ascribed to William Shakespeare in a Bodleian Library manuscript collection of poems which dates probably from the late 1630 s. Another, unascribed version is in the Beinecke Library, Yale University. The poem was first included in a Shakespeare edition in the Oxford Complete Works ( 1986 ). Its authorship has been...

Shall I die

Shall I die  

A lyric in nine stanzas of ten lines each, ascribed to William Shakespeare in a Bodleian Library manuscript collection of poems which dates probably from the late 1630s. Another, unascribed version ...
Antony and Cleopatra

Antony and Cleopatra   Reference library

Michael Dobson and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,330 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...to die. A rustic, who engages the Queen in quibbling banter, brings asps concealed in a basket of figs. Iras and Charmian dress Cleopatra in the same royal robes she wore on the Cydnus: she kisses them farewell, Iras dying before the Queen, who applies an asp to her breast and arm, and herself dies, anticipating a reunion in the afterlife with Antony. Charmian adjusts Cleopatra’s crown and puts an asp to her own arm as Caesar’s guards enter, too late. Caesar himself arrives with his train and deduces the cause of their deaths, conceding that Cleopatra shall be...

The Winter’s Tale

The Winter’s Tale   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Will Sharpe, and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,428 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...the scroll declares that Hermione is innocent and her daughter truly begotten, and adds that ‘the King shall live without an heir if that which is lost be not found’. Leontes at first refuses to believe this, but after a messenger brings the news that Mamillius has died, on which Hermione collapses and is taken away by Paulina and her attendants, he accepts the truth of the oracle. He is already repenting when Paulina returns and tells him Hermione too has died: welcoming her bitter reproaches, he promises to mourn his dead wife and son perpetually. 3.3...

Hamlet, Prince of Denmark

Hamlet, Prince of Denmark   Reference library

Michael Dobson and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
4,261 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...collapses, knowing she has been poisoned, and dies, and the dying Laertes tells Hamlet of the plot to kill him, blaming Claudius. Hamlet stabs Claudius and forces him to drink some of the remaining poison: he dies, and Hamlet and Laertes exchange forgiveness before Laertes’ own death. Hamlet prevents Horatio from drinking poison, begging him to live on in order to tell his story, and, after hearing the approach of Fortinbras’ army and prophesying that Fortinbras will be the next king, the Prince dies. Fortinbras, accompanied by the English ambassadors...

Class

Class   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
6,846 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...‘Better to die by the sword than to perish with hunger.’ In August 1839 , just as the Chartists prepared for their most extreme action, three ‘Sacred Days’ of general strike, the battle of the Bible began in earnest. The Chartists staged demonstrations in more than thirty parish churches to display that they had the moral and Christian authority in this time of crisis. They submitted biblical texts for the vicar to preach, the favourite being from James which began ‘Go to now, ye rich men, weep and howl for your miseries that shall come upon you.’ The...

Much Ado About Nothing

Much Ado About Nothing   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Will Sharpe, Anthony Davies, and Will Sharpe

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,843 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...help of Leonato, Claudio, and Hero, he will trick Benedick and Beatrice into falling in love during the week that intervenes before Claudio and Hero marry. 2.2 Borachio promises Don John he will prevent the marriage between Claudio and Hero by arranging that on its eve Claudio shall see him courting Margaret, Hero’s gentlewoman, in Hero’s clothes at Hero’s window and thus think Hero unfaithful. Don John promises him 1,000 ducats as a fee. 2.3 In the orchard Benedick, reflecting on Claudio’s transformation from soldier to lover, hides to overhear a...

Romeo and Juliet

Romeo and Juliet   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Anthony Davies, and Will Sharpe

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
4,098 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...the worst that ever I heard in my life’, opined Pepys ) , and it was subsequently rewritten by Sir James Howard, who gave it a happy ending (though the tragic ending was performed on alternate nights). Howard’s version, sadly, does not survive, but it had in any case been set aside by the time Romeo and Juliet was supplanted by Thomas Otway’s successful adaptation The History and Fall of Caius Marius ( 1679 ). Otway returned to the play’s earlier sources to have his Juliet (Lavinia) awaken before Romeo (Young Marius) has finished dying of the poison, and a...

As You Like It

As You Like It   Reference library

Michael Dobson and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,253 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...for a mock-betrothal ceremony, and allows Orlando to leave only after exacting solemn promises of a punctual return: alone with Celia she confesses the depth of her love. 4.2 Jaques has some of the Duke’s lords, who have been hunting, sing a jovial song about cuckoldry, ‘What shall he have that killed the deer?’ 4.3 Once more waiting for Orlando, Rosalind and Celia receive Phoebe’s letter, delivered by Silvius: instead of a challenge, as Silvius believes, it is a love poem to Ganymede, and Rosalind sends Silvius away with a scornful reply. Oliver now enters,...

Language

Language   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,614 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...analogy which would make the language consistent with itself in questions of disputed usage, although analogies with the classical languages were explicitly ruled out in his Rudiments of English Grammar ( 1768 ). But the final decision had to wait until ‘all-governing custom shall declare in favour of the one or other’. Priestley's confidence in the rational evolution of human history meant that he assumed common usage would eventually come to disown irrational imperfections. As part of the collective effort towards creating this enlightened state, it was...

Landscape History: The Countryside

Landscape History: The Countryside   Quick reference

H. S. A. Fox

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
6,175 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...variables in the texture of the landscape, such as patterns of lanes and fields. Village landscapes cover large (though not all) parts of a great diagonal swathe of British countryside, stretching from mid‐Somerset to the vicinity of the border with Scotland. As an example we shall take 25 square miles of Berkshire landscape in the vale of the infant river Ock, as shown on the first edition of the one‐inch Ordnance Survey map. Within the square nine villages are shown, many of them with †place‐names in ‐ford (e.g. Stanford in the Vale), or ‐ey (such as...

Prepositions

Prepositions   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
2,035 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...prepositions was hardly intended as a “rule.” Winston Churchill 's witticism about the absurdity of this bugaboo should have laid it to rest. When someone once upbraided him for ending a sentence with a preposition, he rejoined, “That is the type of arrant pedantry up with which I shall not put.” Avoiding a preposition at the end of the sentence sometimes leads to just such a preposterous monstrosity. Perfectly natural-sounding sentences end with prepositions, particularly when a verb with a preposition-particle appears at the end (as in follow up or ask for...

Quotations

Quotations   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
1,951 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...the mechanical process that imprinted meaningful symbols on a sheet of paper, no check-rein of fact or probability can restrain the farthest reaches of idle speculation. [ Fredson Bowers , On Editing Shakespeare and the Elizabethan Dramatists 34–35 ( 1955 ).] On the contrary, I shall argue, the only check-rein on idle critical speculation is critical speculation that is not idle. F.W. Bateson , “The New Bibliography and the ‘New Criticism,’” in Essays in Critical Dissent 1–2 ( 1972 ). Some writers, though, let the lead-in and the quotation stand as...

Epitaph on Elias James

Epitaph on Elias James  

This six-line epitaph survives in two slightly different versions. One is in the same Bodleian manuscript as ‘Shall I die’, where it is attributed to ‘Wm Shakespeare’. The other, unascribed ...
Kho and the Origin of Death

Kho and the Origin of Death  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(San/Botswana, Namibia, South Africa)Kho, the supreme being, the moon, sent an insect to earth to tell humans, “As I die, and dying live, so you shall also die, and dying live.” Along the way, the ...
Hishe, the Moon, and Death

Hishe, the Moon, and Death  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(Aikwe, Auen, Naron/Namibia)Hishe (Hise), God—heaven, the sky—lived in the east. Some say he is the same as Heitsi-Eibib, the Khoi divinity. Some Naron identify Hishe with !Khuba or !Xuba, who lives ...
Tsui‖Goab Is Given a Blow to the Knee by a Dying Foe

Tsui‖Goab Is Given a Blow to the Knee by a Dying Foe  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(Nama/Namibia; Khoi/South Africa)Tsui‖Goab (|Kaang, |Kaggen, Khub, Nanub) was the supreme being, the celestial god of the Khoi. He was omnipresent, wise, a notable warrior of great physical strength, ...
Apocryphal works

Apocryphal works  

A number of works attributed to Shakespeare in his own time and later are now not generally accepted as his. These include six plays added to the second issue (1664) of the Third Folio: The London ...
Belmonte

Belmonte  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Music, Opera
(Mozart: Die Entführung aus dem Serail). Ten. A Spanish nobleman in love with Constanze. When she is kidnapped, together with her maid, he sets off to find her in Pasha Selim's house. With the help ...

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