You are looking at 1-20 of 2,486 entries  for:

  • All: Scandinavia x
clear all

View:

Overview

Scandinavia

The first thing to be clarified is the division of periods, which is not the same in the Nordic lands as in France or England. The “Middle Ages”, in Scandinavia ...

Scandinavia

Scandinavia   Quick reference

Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Place Names (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

...Scandinavia ( Scandia ) Generally accepted as comprising the peninsula of Norway and Sweden with Denmark and Iceland. Some claim that Finland and the Faroe Islands should also be included. The name is derived from the Roman Scandia whose meaning is unknown. Avia is of Germanic origin and represents ‘island’. Scandinavia has given its name to the chemical element,...

Scandinavia

Scandinavia   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Human Geography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Human Geography
Length:
34 words

... A region of northern Europe comprising of Denmark, Sweden, and Norway, although Iceland, Finland, and the Faeroe Islands are sometimes also included. The first three countries have strong linguistic, cultural, and historical...

Scandinavia

Scandinavia   Reference library

Oxford Encyclopedia of the Modern World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
History, Contemporary History (post 1945)
Length:
1,618 words

...Nineteenth Century. The Napoleonic Wars reshaped Scandinavia's political boundaries. Denmark had supported the French and lost Norway to Sweden, which had earlier lost Finland to Russia. The wars brought the Bernadotte dynasty to the Swedish throne and shattered Sweden's absolutist system. This period was also the last time that Scandinavia launched wars of conquest. Much subsequent prosperity can be attributed to Scandinavia's aversion to wars of conquest and its avoidance of large military budgets. Scandinavia also escaped the drains of securing and...

Scandinavia

Scandinavia   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Wine (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... , part of northern Europe which includes norway , sweden , denmark , Finland, and Iceland (the first two of these being new recruits to vine-growing since the last edition of this book). Of these countries, only Denmark has a liberal attitude towards alcoholic drinks and their sale. Elsewhere wine has been sold by state monopolies , which has had the effect of restricting choice. High levels of taxation have made the lot of the Scandinavian wine drinker even harder, although Scandinavian cellars provide famously good, if slow, conditions for...

Scandinavia

Scandinavia   Reference library

Trine Hahnemann

The Oxford Companion to Sugar and Sweets

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Society and culture, Cookery, Food, and Drink
Length:
2,734 words

...Hans Christian Andersen and the philosopher Søren Kierkegaard. Throughout Scandinavia these pastry shops offered a public space where people could meet and be seen in society. Spices Thanks to trade with the Hanseatic League, spices have been present in Scandinavia since the fifteenth century. They were used mostly in mjød , or mead, a fermented honey drink. See mead . When spices became more affordable around 1700 , they began to be used more commonly. In Scandinavia, cinnamon, cardamom, and vanilla have been especially popular in baking for the...

Scandinavia

Scandinavia   Reference library

Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
1,918 words
Illustration(s):
1

... The first thing to be clarified is the division of periods, which is not the same in the Nordic lands as in France or England . The “Middle Ages” , in Scandinavia, means the period from about 800 to the Reformation, which was gradually adopted from 1523 . From 400 BC to AD 800 was the iron age, marked by successive influences exercised over Scandinavia: Celtic, Roman, then continental German. Remember too that the ancients all considered Scandinavia to be an island, the isle of Scandzia, this name perhaps coming from the “goddess” Skadi – who...

Scandinavia

Scandinavia   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
146 words

... In physicial geography, the n European peninsular countries of Sweden and Norway . In a broader, cultural sense it also includes Denmark , Finland , Iceland and the Faroe Islands . The climate ranges from subarctic in the n , to humid continental in the centre, and marine in the w and sw . The terrain is mountainous in the w with swift‐flowing streams. In the e the land slopes more gently and there are thousands of lakes, notably in Finland. Part of the region lies within the Arctic Circle, where tundra predominates. Denmark and s ...

Scandinavia

Scandinavia   Reference library

Torsten Madsen, Marie Louise Stig Sørensen, Lotte Hedeager, and Richard A. Hall

The Oxford Companion To Archaeology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Archaeology
Length:
5,681 words

... Early Prehistory of Scandinavia Scandinavia in the Bronze Age Scandinavia in the Iron Age Scandinavia in the Viking Age Scandinavia: Early Prehistory of Scandinavia Most of Scandinavia was covered by ice during the last glaciation. Immediately south of the ice shield, reindeer hunters lived throughout the glacial period. As the ice retreated, people moved north with the reindeer. During the Allerød , a warmer climatic period (ca. 10,800 BC–ca. 10,000 BC), the forest temporarily invaded the area, and elk became the dominant game animal. For the...

Scandinavia

Scandinavia   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Medieval Warfare and Military Technology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Military History, Social sciences, Warfare and Defence
Length:
7,938 words
Illustration(s):
2

...fierce competition for supremacy over all Scandinavia (and England) and by the emergence of the first supraregional (“national”) systems of military and naval organization. 3. High-medieval Scandinavia (twelfth through early fourteenth century) saw extensive civil wars in Norway and Sweden, internal consolidation (law, administration, military structures) of all three kingdoms, and the integration of various territories outside Scandinavia proper, ranging from negotiations to crusades. 4. Late-medieval Scandinavia (late fourteenth through early sixteenth...

Scandinavia

Scandinavia   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
10,040 words
Illustration(s):
1

... In a strict geographic sense, Scandinavia consists of the Scandinavian Peninsula (Norway, Sweden, and the northernmost part of Finland) to which Denmark is commonly added for historical and cultural reasons. In English there is a tendency to expand the concept of Scandinavia to include all the communities that today conceive of themselves as ‘Nordic’, that is, Finland with Åland, *Iceland , the Faroes, and even *Greenland . For the MA, it makes sense to treat this wider region as a whole. The Faroes, Iceland, and small parts of Greenland were...

Scandinavia

Scandinavia   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Medicine and health
Length:
3,165 words

... Strictly speaking, the Nordic countries comprises Denmark (population, 5.2 million), with the Faroe Islands (44 000) and Greenland (56 000); Finland (5.1 million), with Åland (25 000); Iceland (267 000); Norway (4.4 million); and Sweden (8.8 million). Nevertheless, loosely they are often referred to as Scandinavia — strictly, Denmark, Norway, and Sweden) and this is the usage followed in the article. The political structure and the strong ties existing between the Nordic countries have influenced the development of medicine in Scandinavia. Denmark and...

Scandinavia

Scandinavia   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Scottish History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
4,019 words

... : 1. to 1312 ; 2. 1312–1600 ; 3. since 1600 . 1. to 1312 The countries of Scandinavia, Norway especially, are Scotland's nearest neighbours across the North Sea. The Scottish mainland lies in the same latitudes as Denmark and southern Norway. Southeastern Scotland and Denmark are comparable in that both have stretches of good arable land suitable for the creation of wealth and to form a basis for political unification. North‐western Scotland has some close similarities with Norway's west coast, consisting of strings of islands and a deeply indented...

Scandinavia

Scandinavia   Reference library

Inga-Stina Ewbank and Kiki Lindell

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... . Shakespeare has figured prominently in Scandinavian literary and theatrical culture for the last 200 years, less as an object of bardolatry than as stimulus and model or catalyst in the development of national drama and theatre and in the enrichment of the vernacular languages. More read than acted in the 19th century and more acted than read in the 20th, Shakespeare in Scandinavia is discussed here in terms of (1) reception and translation and (2) performance. (1) Shakespeare arrived in Scandinavia, as in many other parts of Europe, with the...

Scandinavia

Scandinavia   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Politics of the World (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics
Length:
1,024 words

... . The five Nordic countries of Denmark , Finland , Iceland , Norway , and Sweden together constitute Scandinavia. The Nordic-Teutonic people inhabited the Nordic areas from ancient times, sharing a single language. The Viking age ( 800–1000 c. e .) was marked by a number of connected petty kingdoms, and during this period Iceland, the Faroe Islands, and Greenland were settled. Another group, distinct both ethnically and linguistically, settled the Finnish area ( 100 c. e .); later, Swedes settled there as well. In 1389 , the Swedish-Finnish...

Scandinavia

Scandinavia   Reference library

Lars Mjøset

The Oxford Companion to Comparative Politics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics
Length:
1,039 words

... The five Nordic countries of Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden together constitute Scandinavia. The Nordic-Teutonic people inhabited the Nordic areas from ancient times, sharing a single language. In the Viking age (800–1000 CE) the region consisted of petty kingdoms. During this period Iceland, the Faroe Islands, and Greenland were settled. Another group, distinct both ethnically and linguistically, settled the Finnish area (100 CE); later, Swedes settled there as well. The Swedish–Finnish area fell under the rule of the queen of Denmark...

Scandinavia

Scandinavia   Reference library

Encyclopedia of the Enlightenment

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945)
Length:
3,631 words

... . The eighteenth-century courses of the Scandinavian archrivals, Sweden (then including Finland) and the dual kingdoms of Denmark and Norway showed many similarities. Exhausted after the great Nordic war of 1700–1721 , they concentrated on peaceful relations and on internal matters; the period from 1720 to 1800 in Denmark was aptly called den lange fred (“the long peace”). Sweden, though less inclined to give up its ambitions as a great power, mainly lived in peace with its neighbors, except for a misfired attack on Russia in 1740 , a...

Scandinavia

Scandinavia   Reference library

Jan-Erik Lundström

The Oxford Companion to the Photograph

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
2,421 words

... . The Swedish chemist Carl Vilhelm von Scheele's ( 1742–86 ) work on the light sensitivity of silver salts and, in 1777 , discovery of the unequal darkening effects of the different colours of the spectrum, brought Scandinavia into the annals of photographic history. Later, excited reports following the announcement of Daguerre 's process in Paris in January 1839 were published immediately in Scandinavian newspapers such as Aftonbladet (Stockholm) and Åbo Underrättelser (Turku). By September, the Dane Christian Tuxen Falbe ( 1791–1849 ),...

Scandinavia

Scandinavia   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Women in World History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
History
Length:
4,805 words
Illustration(s):
2

... . The term “Scandinavia” covers three countries: Denmark, Norway, and Sweden. The languages spoken in these countries are sufficiently similar to be seen as three dialects. But the term is often used interchangeably with “Norden,” which in addition includes Finland, Iceland, the Faeroe Islands, and Greenland. Icelandic and especially Finnish and Inuit are languages different from those spoken in the Scandinavian countries. The Nordic region may be understood as a core of Scandinavian countries surrounded by the rest of Norden. This article centers on...

Scandinavia

Scandinavia (2010)   Reference library

James H. LIDE

Berkshire Encyclopedia of Sustainability

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Science and technology, Social sciences
Length:
1,602 words

... Scandinavia 34.9 million est. pop. 2010 Scandinavia consists of five nations in Northern Europe: Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, and, far off in the North Atlantic, Iceland. (The term Nordic is also sometimes used for roughly the same region, especially with reference to the Nordic Council—Norway, Sweden, Finland, Denmark, Iceland, Greenland, and the Faroe Islands.) The Scandinavian Peninsula is (technically) made up of only Norway and Sweden, although Finland is usually included in the term, as well. Denmark is the only one of the countries...

conversion of Scandinavia

conversion of Scandinavia   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
490 words

...of Scandinavia The first missions to Scandinavia, after *Willibrord ’s unsuccessful attempt c .705 , were sent with papal approval by *Louis the Pious . An early success was the *baptism of a Danish king ( Harald Klak ) in 826 , but a year later he was exiled, and the Danish mission was not resumed for over 20 years. *Ansgar had more success and established a missionary base at *Birka that survived during his lifetime, possibly longer. The only known 9th-century churches in Scandinavia were in the trading places Birka, *Schleswig , and...

View: