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Sayf al-Dawla

(d. 967) Hamdanid ruler of Aleppo (r. 945–67). Famed for the illustrious scholars of his court and his fearless battles against Byzantine aggressions on Muslim frontiers. His ...

Sayf al-Dawla

Sayf al-Dawla (June 916)   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
273 words

... al-Dawla , Ḥamdānid lord of Aleppo; born June 916 , died Aleppo 25 Jan. 967 . After asserting his power over Aleppo and Damascus and failing in his advance against Egypt, Sayf al-Dawla concentrated his efforts on invasions of Byz. His first raid in 936 proved a failure, and his war against John Kourkouas had varied success: in 938 Sayf al-Dawla advanced into Byz. territory and seized enormous booty, and the next year he attempted to conquer Armenia, but in the 940s Kourkouas began a successful offensive. Kourkouas's replacement by a certain ...

Sayf al-Dawla

Sayf al-Dawla  

(d. 967)Hamdanid ruler of Aleppo (r. 945–67). Famed for the illustrious scholars of his court and his fearless battles against Byzantine aggressions on Muslim frontiers. His military successes were ...
Abū Firās

Abū Firās  

More fully al-Ḥārith ibn Saʿīd ibn Hamdān al- Taghlibī, Arab prince, warrior, and poet; born Iraq 932, died Syria 4 Apr. 968.His mother was of Byz. origin, and after ...
Tzamandos

Tzamandos  

(Τζαμανδός, mod. Kuşkalesi), site in Cappadocia, on a high peak overlooking the road between Caesarea and Melitene. It first appears in the historical sources in 908 when Melias built its ...
al- Mutanabbī

al- Mutanabbī  

(d. 965)Also known as Abu al-Tayyib Ahmad ibn al-Husayn. Generally considered the greatest Arabic poet. Born in Kufa, Iraq. Became known as al-Mutanabbi, “the would-be prophet,” after leading a ...
John Kourkouas

John Kourkouas  

(c. 895–post 946),Byzantine general of Armenian stock, staunchly loyal to Romanos I Lekapenos, who was appointed army commander-in-chief (“domestic of the schools”) in 922, while still under thirty. ...
Basil the Nothos

Basil the Nothos  

(“bastard”), parakoimomenos; born ca.925, died after 985. The son of Romanos I by a bondwoman of “Scythian” (Slav?) origin, Basil was a eunuch from his boyhood. In 944–47 he was ...
Romanos II

Romanos II  

Emperor of the Macedonian dynasty (959–63); son of Constantine VII and Helen; born Constantinople 939, died Constantinople 15 Mar. 963.In Sept. 944 Romanos I married him to Bertha (Eudokia) ...
Leo Phokas

Leo Phokas  

kouropalates; brother of Nikephoros II and son of Bardas Phokas; born ca.915–20, died on island of Prote? after 970. Constantine VII, seeking the support of the Phokas family, appointed Leo ...
Constantine VII Porphyrogennetos

Constantine VII Porphyrogennetos  

Emperor of the Macedonian dynasty (945–59); born 17 or 18 May 905, died Constantinople 9 Nov. 959.His birth to Leo VI and Zoe Karbonopsina provoked the conflict over the ...
Ḥamdānids

Ḥamdānids  

Arab nomadic Shii clan that undermined Abbasid rule from Mesopotamia (905–991). Its influence eventually extended from Mosul to Baghdad, westward to northern Syria, and northward into Armenia. The ...
Ḥamdānids

Ḥamdānids   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Arabic Literary Terms and Devices

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

..., one based in Mosul and the other in Aleppo, which traced their lineage back to Ḥamdān ibn Ḥamdūn ibn al-Ḥārith. The towering figure of the Aleppo branch was the prince Sayf al-Dawla (r. 336–56 / 947–67 ), the subject of many panegyrics by al-Mutanabbī (d. 354 / 965 ). These are called the Sayfiyyāt . Other poets patronized by Sayf al-Dawla include Abū Firās al-Ḥamdānī (d. 357 / 968 ), who was famous for his hunting poems or ṭardiyyāt , and al-Ṣanawbarī (d. 334 / 945 or 946 ), who composed many flower poems or zahriyyāt as well as poems...

khuṭba

khuṭba   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Arabic Literary Terms and Devices

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...specifically a sermon delivered at the mosque on Friday or during a religious festival. Ibn Nubāta al-Khaṭīb (d. 374 / 984 or 985 ), the khaṭīb of Aleppo during the reign of the Ḥamdānid ruler Sayf al-Dawla, authored a collection of sermons which circulated widely, with commentaries by ˁAbd al-Laṭīf al-Baghdādī (d. 629 / 1231 ) and al-Qalyūbī (d. 1069 / 1659 ). Many were composed in rhymed prose or sajˁ . Also worthy of mention is the Nahj al-balāgha , a collection of khuṭba s and sayings attributed to ˁAlī ibn Abī Ṭālib (d. 40 / 660 ). ...

al-Kubra, Abu'l Jannab Ahmad ibn ‘Umar Najm al-Din

al-Kubra, Abu'l Jannab Ahmad ibn ‘Umar Najm al-Din (540–617)   Reference library

The Biographical Encyclopaedia of Islamic Philosophy

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Philosophy, Religion
Length:
1,039 words

...by Najm al-Din we find worthy of mention Sa‘d al-Din Hammuya (d. 650 / 1253 ), a Persian Kubrawi master, Majd al-Din Baghdadi (d. 616 / 1219 ), master of Najm al-Din Razi (d. 618 / 1221 ), Sayf al-Din Bakharzi (d. 659 / 1261 ) of Transoxiana, and Radi al-Din ‘Ali Lala of Samarqand (d. 642 / 1244 ). Kubra penned a lengthy commentary on the Qur'an left unfinished by his death but picked up by Najm al-Din Razi and a later Kubrawi, ‘Ala' al-Dawla Simnani (d. 736 / 1336 ) (oft-cited for his confident critique of Ibn al-‘Arabi 's...

al-Farabi, Abu Nasr

al-Farabi, Abu Nasr (c.258–c.339)   Reference library

The Biographical Encyclopaedia of Islamic Philosophy

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Philosophy, Religion
Length:
2,993 words

...Arabic knowledge with Ibn al-Sarraj (d. 298 / 929 ). In this city also, he studied logic under the instruction of the Nestorian Christian Abu Bishr Matta b. Yunus . In Harran or Baghdad, it would seem that his logic and philosophy instruction was provided by Yuhanna b. Haylan . In general, his philosophical thinking was nourished in the heritage of Aristotelian teachings, and he wrote most of his books in the Islamic environment of tenth-century Baghdad. Later in Halab (modern Aleppo) al-Farabi met the Hamdanid prince Sayf al-Dawla, who became his patron,...

Dawlah

Dawlah   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Islamic World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion, Social sciences, Regional and Area Studies
Length:
3,089 words

...is inconclusive. Over time, dawlah came to connote a “turn of success.” The word was also used by the philosopher, al-Kindī ( c.801–866 ) as the equivalent of mulk , kingship ( F. Rosenthal , 1960 ). Dawlah in the 900s came into use as a sobriquet bestowed on or appropriated by various princes, such as those of the Ḥamdānid ( 929–1003 ) and Būyid ( 932–1055 ) houses; hence, such titles as Rukn al-Dawlah (Pillar of the State), Sayf al-Dawlah (Sword of the State). Ibn Khaldūn ( d. 1406 ) preferred to use the terms mulk and siyāsah ʿaqlīyah (the...

Regalia

Regalia   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
2,485 words
Illustration(s):
1

...the parasol ( miẓalla ), and many relics of the early Shi῾ite martyrs, such as ῾Ali’s twin-bladed sword known as Dhu῾l-fiqar, were miraculously discovered and used as regalia. Lesser but powerful princes adopted elaborate regalia and ceremonial. The Hamdanid amir of Aleppo, Sayf al-Dawla ( r. 945–67 ), for example, was invested with a diadem set with precious stones, neck chain and two gold arm buckles also set with precious stones. The Saljuq Turks ( r. 1038–1194 ) regarded the bow and arrow as regal attributes but also adopted various Islamic insignia. The...

Woodwork

Woodwork   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
15,790 words
Illustration(s):
10

...frame set with seven squares. Each square, carved in a late version of the Beveled style, is framed with a narrow band of beveled ornament, which is a condensed and abstracted version of that found on the larger ῾Adud al-Dawla panels. The carving on the rectangular panels on the exterior, like the smaller ones ordered by ῾Adud al-Dawla, adds new elements: the sinuous lines are carved in deep relief, the palmettes are rhythmical and symmetrical, and the whole design is marked by an unprecedented sense of plasticity. Despite their certain provenance from ...

Syria

Syria   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Archaeology, History
Length:
20,061 words
Illustration(s):
2

...in Palestine and Syria. It met little resistance, and the new territories were added to the growing Egyptian estates. In 935 , the Tulunids were followed by the Ikshids, and Egypt once again exercised control over Palestine and much of Syria. In 941 , ῾ Ali , surnamed Sayf ad-Dawla , who was the brother of the Hamdanid amir of Mosul in northern Iraq, drove the Ikshids from Aleppo and Hims (Homs) and established a new principality that ruled northern Syria for the next half century. The political dismemberment of the ῾Abbasid caliphate was accompanied by...

Architecture

Architecture   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
117,015 words
Illustration(s):
77

...and bears traces of its original color. The hospital overlooking Damascus ( 1250–56 ) built by the Kurdish prince Sayf al-Din Qaymari was clearly modeled on that of Nur al-Din, but the Qaymari Hospital shows how Syrian architecture had been systematized in the intervening century. The lateral iwans are reduced in size to accommodate two extra rooms, domes have been replaced with barrel or groin vaults, and the awkward portal of Nur al-Din's hospital has been replaced by a stone muqarnas vault framed by striped and joggled voussoirs. Except for the main...

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