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Samuel Colman

(b 1780; d London, 21 Jan. 1845). English painter, active for most of his known career in Bristol, 1816–38. Local directories of the time describe him as a portrait painter ... ...

Colman, Samuel

Colman, Samuel (1780–1845)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Western Art

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
155 words

..., Samuel ( 1780–1845 ). English painter. Colman's birthplace is unknown but he lived and worked in Bristol ( 1816–38 ) as a portrait painter and drawing master. Although only a peripheral member of the Bristol School, Colman's genre paintings were influenced by Edward Bird and his pupil E. V. Rippingille ( 1798–1859 ); his S. James's Fair ( 1824 ; Bristol, AG) appearing one year after the exhibition of Rippingille's Bristol Fair (priv. coll.). However, Colman is best known for his enormous, sensational biblical pictures, in the manner of John...

Colman, Samuel

Colman, Samuel   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Art (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
114 words

..., Samuel ( b 1780 ; d London, 21 Jan. 1845 ). English painter, active for most of his known career in Bristol, 1816–38 . Local directories of the time describe him as a portrait painter and drawing master, but he is now known for a small number of grandiose apocalyptic scenes in the manner of Francis Danby (likewise active in Bristol) or John Martin . Until recently he was so obscure that when one of these paintings, The Edge of Doom ( 1836–8 ), was acquired by the Brooklyn Museum, New York, in 1969 , it was thought to be by an unrelated American...

Colman, Samuel

Colman, Samuel (4 March 1832)   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of American Art

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
567 words
Illustration(s):
1

..., Samuel ( b Portland, ME , 4 March 1832 ; d New York , 26 March 1920 ), painter , interior designer and writer. Colman grew up in New York, where his father, Samuel Colman , ran a successful publishing business. The family bookstore on Broadway, a popular meeting place for artists, offered Colman early introductions to such Hudson River School painters as Asher B. Durand, with whom he is said to have studied briefly around 1850 . Having won early recognition for his paintings of popular Hudson River School locations, he was elected an Associate of...

Colman, Samuel, Jr.

Colman, Samuel, Jr. (1832–1920)   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of American Art and Artists (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
445 words

..., Samuel, Jr. ( 1832–1920 ). Painter , etcher , and designer Unusually versatile, he painted western scenery and romantically flavored foreign locales, spearheaded the American watercolor movement , and worked with Louis Comfort Tiffany on decorative projects. Also an early and knowledgeable enthusiast for Asian culture, he amassed a large collection of Japanese art and decorative objects. A native of Portland, Maine, Colman spent his formative years in New York and probably studied briefly as a young man with Asher B. Durand . At the outset...

Samuel Colman

Samuel Colman  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(b 1780; d London, 21 Jan. 1845).English painter, active for most of his known career in Bristol, 1816–38. Local directories of the time describe him as a portrait painter ...
Samuel Colman

Samuel Colman  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(1832–1920).Painter, etcher, and designer. Unusually versatile, he painted western scenery and romantically flavored foreign locales, spearheaded the American watercolor movement, and worked with ...
A Midsummer Night’s Dream

A Midsummer Night’s Dream   Reference library

Michael Dobson and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,220 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...a half is one of successive adaptations : Betterton ’s The Fairy Queen ( 1692 ), Garrick ’s The Fairies ( 1755 ), George Colman ’s A Fairy Tale ( 1763 ), and the independent fortunes of ‘Pyramus and Thisbe’, transplanted into Charles Johnson ’s Love in a Forest ( 1723 ) and made into separate mock-operas by Richard Leveridge ( 1716 ) and Frederick Lampe ( 1745 ). An attempt by Garrick, in collaboration with Colman, to revive the whole play in 1763 was, instructively, a flop: the play was too various, and too much of an ensemble piece, to fit...

ancient mariner effect

ancient mariner effect  

A tendency for people to be more willing to disclose intimate details of their lives to strangers than to acquaintances. Also called the passing stranger effect. [Named after Samuel Taylor ...
curvature illusion

curvature illusion  

A visual illusion in which a semicircle appears more curved than a shorter circular arc with the same radius of curvature (see illustration). The illusion appears to have been discovered by the ...
drapetomania

drapetomania  

A form of mania (2) supposedly affecting slaves in the 19th century, manifested by an uncontrollable impulse to wander or run away from their white masters, preventable by regular whipping. The ...
dysaesthesia aethiopis

dysaesthesia aethiopis  

A mental disorder supposedly peculiar to black slaves and endemic among them in North America in the mid nineteenth century, manifested by laziness and insensibility to pain when whipped. The article ...
normal science

normal science  

According to an influential idea first presented by the US historian and philosopher of science Thomas S(amuel) Kuhn (1922–96) in his book The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (1962), a period in ...
Kuhnian

Kuhnian  

Of or relating to the ideas and writings of the US historian and philosopher of science Thomas S(amuel) Kuhn (1922–96), especially his distinction between normal science and scientific revolution and ...
Kohs Block Design Test

Kohs Block Design Test  

A psychometric test in which the respondent has to arrange groups of 4, 9, or 16 multi-coloured blocks to copy patterns presented on test cards, designed originally to differentiate brain-damaged ...
Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities

Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities  

A test for the assessment of psycholinguistic disabilities in children, consisting of 10 ordinary subtests plus a further two optional subtests for children between the ages of 2 and 10. It was ...
Munchausen by proxy syndrome

Munchausen by proxy syndrome  

Another name for factitious disorder by proxy; named after the disorder of Munchausen syndrome, but not itself a mental disorder or syndrome according to the British paediatrician (Samuel) Roy (later ...
paradigm shift

paradigm shift  

According to a doctrine propounded by the US historian and philosopher of science Thomas S(amuel) Kuhn (1922–96) in his book The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (1962), a rapid change, marking ...
John Bannister

John Bannister  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(1760–1836)English actor, son of a famous comedian, Charles Bannister (1741–1804). Although Charles encouraged John's talents as a visual artist, after a time at the Royal Academy the son took ...
George Colman, the Elder

George Colman, the Elder  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1732–94),edited the Connoisseur (1754–6) with Bonnell Thornton (1724–68) and collaborated with Garrick in writing The Clandestine Marriage (1766). He was manager of Covent Garden, 1767–74, and of ...
shell-shock

shell-shock  

A term introduced by the English psychologist Charles Samuel Myers (1873–1946), in an article in the medical journal The Lancet in 1915, to denote what came to be called post-traumatic stress ...

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