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Rufinus (1), Flavius

Rufinus (1), Flavius   Reference library

Edward Arthur Thompson and Antony J. S. Spawforth

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
92 words

... (1), Flavius (consul ad 392 ), from Elusa in Gaul, magister officiorum ( 388–92 ), praetorian prefect of the east ( 392–5 ), left by Theodosius (2) I as guardian of his son Arcadius ( 2 ) . He at once incurred the enmity of Stilicho , who had him killed (November 395) in the presence of Arcadius. Although he was posthumously maligned (among others by the poet Claudian ), Libanius praised his eastern administration. PLRE 1, ‘Rufinus’ 18. Edward Arthur Thompson / Antony J. S....

Rufinus

Rufinus  

(῾Πουφι̑νος), praetorian prefect and adviser of Theodosios I and Arkadios; born Elusa, Gaul, died outside Constantinople 27 Nov. 395.He was magister officiorum 388–92 and used his tenure to increase ...
Stilicho

Stilicho  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
Late Roman general. In ad 395 Honorius became ruler of the western empire, but effective power lay with the outstanding military personality of his time, ‘enigmatic Stilicho, half‐Roman and ...
Theodosius I

Theodosius I  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(c. 346–95),Roman emperor 379–95, known as Theodosius the Great. Proclaimed co-emperor by the Emperor Gratian in 379, he took control of the Eastern Empire and ended the war with the Visigoths. A ...
Rufinus, Flavius

Rufinus, Flavius (395)   Reference library

David Natal

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

..., Flavius (d. 395 ) Magister Officiorum ( 388–92 ), consul ( 392 ), and Praefectus Praetorio under Theodosius I ( 392–5 ), and briefly regent for Theodosius’ son Arcadius . In 395 , during Alaric ’s invasion of Thrace, Rufinus rejected the assistance of Stilicho , who ordered Gainas to kill him. Rufinus was praised by Libanius but commented upon adversely by Zosimus , and was the object of a substantial psogos In Rufinum in two books by Claudian . Rufinus came from Gaul , was a pious Christian, and founded a martyrium and an...

Arcadius (2), Flavius

Arcadius (2), Flavius   Reference library

Edward Arthur Thompson and W. Liebeschuetz

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
107 words

...(2), Flavius , eastern Roman emperor ( ad 383–408 ), was the elder son of Theodosius (2) I . Weak and irritable, he filled the essential role of emperor, while policy was made by a succession of strong ministers, Rufinus (1) , Eutropius ( 2 ) , and Anthemius. The independence of civilian government in the east was maintained in the face of pressure from the west under Stilicho , and of Gothic federate bands led respectively by Alaric and Gainas. A. D. Cameron and J. Long , with L. Sherry , Barbarians and Politics at the Court of Arcadius ...

Clement of Rome

Clement of Rome   Reference library

Henry Chadwick and Mark Julian Edwards

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
234 words

...arbitrarily deposing clergy. This letter is remarkable, in a largely pacifist Church, for its use of martial imagery. Clement has been identified improbably with Flavius Clemens and more probably with Peter's successor as bishop of Rome. The Clementina say that he is of Caesar's household, but associate neither him nor Peter with Rome. The chief of the numerous works attributed to him are (1) the Second Epistle , a mid-2nd-cent. sermon on virginity of uncertain origin; (2) Apostolic Constitutions , eight books of law and liturgy, c. 375 , of which the...

Arcadius, Flavius

Arcadius, Flavius (377–408)   Reference library

David Natal

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...tensions between both courts, leading to episodes of open confrontation such as Gildo ’s revolt (397). Described as a feeble personality ( Philostorgius , XI, 6; Zosimus , V, 12, 1), Arcadius was dominated by several civilian ministers in quick succession: Rufinus fell in a plot orchestrated by the eunuch Eutropius (395), who arranged Arcadius’ wedding with Eudoxia (395) and dominated until 399, when Gainas succeeded and had Eutropius executed; Gainas, however, fell a year later in a plot orchestrated by Eudoxia, who held control until her death in...

Stilicho

Stilicho   Reference library

David Natal

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...4–6; Ambrose , De Obitu Theodosii , 5), but could not enforce his claim to guardianship over Arcadius , the teenaged emperor of the East ( Zosimus , IV, 59, 1). Over the following years, Stilicho’s attempts to gain control of the East were frustrated by two unsuccessful expeditions against Alaric in Greece (395 and 397), and by his rivalry with successive Eastern Praefecti Praetorio Rufinus and Eutropius , who in 397 convinced the Senate in Constantinople to declare Stilicho a public enemy. More successful in the West, Stilicho defeated ...

grammar

grammar   Reference library

Robert A. Kaster

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
1,013 words

...work of linguistic analysis to survive intact from Latin antiquity. Beyond the articles for the individuals named above, see also albinus (2) ; asmonius ; aurelius opillus ; cledonius ; cominianus ; consentius ; flavius caper ; hellenistic philosophy ; iulius romanus ; marius victorinus ; phocas ; pompeius ; rufinus (3) ; servius . The extant treatises of the 3rd–6th cents. are collected in Keil , Gramm. Lat. ; the standard edn. of Charisius is now that of K. Barwick (1922); of Dositheus, J. Tolkiehn (1913); of Donatus, L. Holtz (1981);...

Translation

Translation   Reference library

Alexander Kazhdan, Alice-Mary Talbot, Francis J. Thomson, Robert W. Thomson, Alexander Kazhdan, and Alice-Mary Talbot

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
1,781 words

...interpretation of meteorological phenomena appeared in the 7th C.); military exploits and adventures (alleged memoirs of the Phrygian Dares from the 6th C., the story of Apollonios of Tyre ); theological, hagiographical, and church historical writings translated by Jerome , Rufinus , etc. Already by 373 the vita of St. Antony the Great by Athanasios of Alexandria appeared in Latin. Interest in contemporary Greek literature can be traced through the 9th C., when Anastasius Bibliothecarius rendered the Chronographia of Theophanes the Confessor into...

Caesarea

Caesarea   Reference library

Joseph Patrich

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Bible and Archaeology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Archaeology, Religion
Length:
6,858 words
Illustration(s):
1

...with the Samaritan high priest in the Samaria hills and fled abroad. Material Remains. The archaeological finds are in good accord with the detailed literary description by Flavius Josephus and references in later sources. All the Herodian structures were built of local kurkar Aerial view of the harbor. Baker Photo Archive sandstone; the “white stone” ( Ant . 15.331; J.W. 1.408, 414) or “polished stone” ( Ant. 15.339) was a thick layer of polished white stucco of masonry style that coated the walls, not marble, as some scholars have opined. The...

Poetry, Greek

Poetry, Greek   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
29,051 words
Illustration(s):
4

... ce ) and Nicarchus ( c.80 ce )—started to focus on satirical topics, which through the reception of the Latin poet Martial ( c.40–103 ce ) came to be most closely associated with the epigrammatic genre in modern European literature. Also active in the first century ce was Rufinus, to whom the Greek Anthology attributes around forty highly erotic epigrams, followed by Strato of Sardis, who wrote a collection of pederastic poems entitled Paidikē Mousa . Last but not least, the Greek epigram experienced a renaissance in the sixth century ce when...

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