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Rudyard Kipling

Subject: Literature

(1865–1936), British poet, novelist, and writer of short stories, resided for several years after 1892 at Brattleboro, Vt. With his brother-in-law, Wolcott Balestier, he wrote ...

Kipling, Rudyard

Kipling, Rudyard (30 December 1865)   Reference library

Benezit Dictionary of British Graphic Artists and Illustrators

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

..., Rudyard British , 19th – 20th century, male. Born 30 December 1865 , in Bombay; died January 1936 , in London. Draughtsman , illustrator . Rudyard Kipling, the celebrated novelist, short story writer and poet, also produced illustrations for his Just So Stories . Bibliography Osterwalder, Marcus (ed.): Dictionnaire des illustrateurs 1800-1914 , Ides et Calendes, Neuchâtel,...

Kipling, Rudyard

Kipling, Rudyard (1865–1936)   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Companion to American Literature (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2021
Subject:
Literature
Length:
55 words

..., Rudyard ( 1865–1936 ), British poet , novelist , and writer of short stories , resided for several years after 1892 at Brattleboro, Vermont. With his brother-in-law, Wolcott Balestier, he wrote The Naulahka (1892). Captains Courageous (1897) is Kipling’s own work concerned with the American scene in telling of life aboard a fishing schooner out of...

Kipling, Rudyard

Kipling, Rudyard (1865–1936)   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
73 words

..., Rudyard ( Joseph Rudyard Kipling ) ( 1865–1936 ) British writer , b. India . His Barrack Room Ballads and Other Verses ( 1892 ), which include “If” and “Gunga Din”, is a classic of British colonial literature. His novels include The Light That Failed ( 1890 ) and Kim ( 1901 ). His children's stories include The Jungle Book ( 1894 ) and the Just So Stories ( 1902 ). Kipling was the first English writer to receive the Nobel Prize in literature ( 1907...

Kipling, Rudyard

Kipling, Rudyard   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to American Literature (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Literature
Length:
65 words

..., Rudyard ( 1865–1936 ), British poet, novelist, and writer of short stories, came to the U.S. ( 1889 ) via California, resided for several years after 1892 at Brattleboro, Vt., with his brother-in-law Wolcott Balestier , with whom he wrote The Naulahka ( 1892 ), but with whom he later quarreled. Captains Courageous ( 1897 ) is Kipling's own work concerned with the American...

Kipling, Rudyard

Kipling, Rudyard (1865–1936)   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Maritime History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Military History
Length:
661 words

...18, 1936 , and was buried in Poet’s Corner, Westminster Abbey. [ See also English Literature .] Carrington, Charles Edmund . Rudyard Kipling: His Life and Work . Rev. ed. London: Macmillan, 1978. Originally published in 1955. Kipling, Rudyard . Captains Courageous . Edited by Leonée Ormond . Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1995. Lycett, Andrew . Rudyard Kipling . London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1999. Page, Norman . A Kipling Companion . London: Macmillan, 1984. Leonée...

Kipling, Rudyard

Kipling, Rudyard (1865–1936)([Lit.])   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Reference and Allusion (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
129 words

..., Rudyard [Lit.] ( 1865–1936 ) An English novelist , short-story writer , and poet , who was born in India. Poems such as ‘The White Man's Burden’, ‘If’, and ‘ *Gunga Din’ came to be regarded as epitomizing British colonial and imperialistic attitudes. His other works include stories such as The Jungle Book ( 1894 ) and the Just So Stories ( 1902 ) > Mentioned in the context of old-fashioned and idealized colonialist attitudes (adjective Kiplingesque ) The trumpets had sounded a fanfare and the thousand had sung the four verses of Everard's...

Kipling, Rudyard

Kipling, Rudyard (1865–1936)   Reference library

J. A. Cannon

The Oxford Companion to British History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
331 words

..., Rudyard ( 1865–1936 ) . Kipling is often thought of primarily as the trumpet of empire, but his writings were more varied than that suggests and he was far from triumphalist in tone. His parents were methodists. Kipling was born in Bombay, where his father had a chair in architecture. His first name is derived from Rudyard Lake, near Leek (Staffs.), where his parents had met. Stanley Baldwin was his first cousin. Kipling hurt his eyes reading as a boy and wore spectacles from his schooldays. After United Services College in Devon, he returned to...

Kipling, Rudyard

Kipling, Rudyard (1865–1936)   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Hardy

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
382 words

..., Rudyard ( 1865–1936 ), precocious , prolific , and very popular writer of fiction and verse . He met Hardy in the summer of 1890 ; Kipling had come to London from India a few months earlier, and was enjoying a remarkable success ( The Times had published a leading article on his work on 25 March). The conversation at their first meeting is briefly recalled in Hardy's autobiography: ‘“He talked about the East.… He told curious details about Indian life”’ ( LW 236). At about the same time Hardy met, at the home of Edmund *Gosse , Caroline...

Kipling, Rudyard

Kipling, Rudyard (1865–1936)   Reference library

Gavin Ewart

The Oxford Companion to Modern Poetry (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

..., Rudyard ( 1865–1936 ) Born in Bombay (now Mumbai), sent (at the age of six) with his sister to horrible foster-parents in Southsea, and then to an equally horrible public school. He returned to India to work as a journalist, and, by way of short prose pieces and poems, embarked on a literary career. Somebody once said of Kipling: ‘Even if he's not a great poet, he's certainly a great something !’ His best novel, Kim , could be called great, and the same contentious epithet could be applied to the best short stories. The poetry is a different matter....

Kipling, Rudyard

Kipling, Rudyard   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of British Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature
Length:
3,391 words
Illustration(s):
1

...S. Introduction to A Choice of Kipling's Verse . London, 1941. Astute criticism by a leading modernist poet. Gilmour, David . The Long Recessional: The Imperial Life of Rudyard Kipling . New York, 2002. Detailed account of Kipling's role as a public, political figure. Green, Roger Lancelyn , ed. Kipling: The Critical Heritage . New York, 1971. A useful collection of early critical responses to Kipling. Keating, Peter . Kipling the Poet . London, 1994. Essential commentary on the poetry. Mallett, Phillip . Rudyard Kipling: A Literary Life . Houndmills,...

Kipling, Rudyard

Kipling, Rudyard   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Twentieth-Century Literature in English

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

..., Rudyard ( 1865–1936 ), English novelist , poet , and short-story writer , born in Bombay, India, the son of John Lockwood Kipling , art teacher and illustrator, and Alice , sister-in-law of Sir Edward Burne-Jones , the Pre-Raphaelite painter. As a young child, Kipling was left in England with foster-parents for several years, a traumatic experience of abandonment which was reworked notably in his important short story ‘Baa Baa, Black Sheep’. His secondary education was at the United Services College—an experience which forms the basis for Stalky...

Kipling, Rudyard

Kipling, Rudyard (1865–1936)   Reference library

The Oxford Guide to Literary Britain & Ireland (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature, Society and culture
Length:
113 words

..., Rudyard ( 1865–1936 ), poet and novelist : lives in Portsmouth 1874–7 ; educ. Portsmouth and Westward Ho! ; spends holidays in London ( Fulham : North End Cres.) and Rottingdean ; lives in London ( Strand : Villiers St.) 1889–91 , Maidencombe 1896–7 , Rottingdean 1897–1902 , Burwash 1902–36 ; spends summer in Kessingland , 1914 ; stays at Brown's Hotel ( Mayfair : Dover St.); buried in London ( Westminster Abbey ); commemorated in Rottingdean and Westward Ho! The Light That Failed 1890 , Life's Handicap 1891 , Barrack‐Room...

Kipling, Rudyard

Kipling, Rudyard (1865–1936)   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Literature
Length:
381 words

..., Rudyard ( 1865–1936 ) Writer , born in Bombay (Mumbai), but brought to England in 1871 ; his unhappy separation from his parents is recalled in ‘Baa, Baa, Black Sheep’ ( 1888 , story) and The Light That Failed ( 1890 , novel). His attendance at the United Services College, Westward Ho! is depicted in his schoolboy tales Stalky & Co . ( 1899 ). From 1882 to 1889 Kipling worked as a journalist in India; many of his early poems and stories were originally published in newspapers or for the Indian Railway Library, and were later collected under...

Kipling, Rudyard

Kipling, Rudyard (1865–1936)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Australian Literature (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
437 words

..., Rudyard ( 1865–1936 ) visited Australia for two weeks in November 1891 . In his autobiographical fragment Something of Myself ( 1937 ) he describes how he was welcomed in Melbourne and asked by a ‘leading newspaper’ to write a report on the Melbourne Cup, an offer he declined. If the brevity of his visit meant that Kipling the man was not well known in Australia, his work was a different matter. Immensely popular in Australia, it was regarded as a model of narrative realism, while his attitudes contributed markedly to the developing sense of a...

Kipling, Rudyard

Kipling, Rudyard   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Children's Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature, Children's literature studies
Length:
1,169 words
Illustration(s):
1

... (1899) Kim (1900) Just-So Stories for Little Children (1902) Puck of Pook's Hill (1906) Rewards and Fairies (1910) Something of Myself (1937) Secondary Works Lycett, Andrew . Rudyard Kipling . London: Weidenfeld and Nicholson, 1999. Plotz, Judith A. , ed. Children's Literature 20 (1992). Special issue devoted to Kipling. Wilson, Angus . The Strange Ride of Rudyard Kipling . London: Secker and Warburg,...

Kipling, Rudyard

Kipling, Rudyard (1865–1936)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Fairy Tales

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
134 words

..., Rudyard ( 1865–1936 ), English author , used Puck to introduce the characters from the past in Puck of Pook's Hill ( 1906 ) and Rewards and Fairies ( 1910 ). Two children, Dan and Una, are acting scenes from A Midsummer Night's Dream in a fairy ring on Midsummer's Eve, when they find they have conjured up ‘a small, brown, broad-shouldered, pointy-eared person’. He is the last of the Old Things who once were pagan gods and then became the People of the Hills; he is contemptuous of the word ‘fairy’—‘little buzz-flies with butterfly wings and...

Kipling, Rudyard

Kipling, Rudyard (1865–1936)   Reference library

Gillian Avery

The Oxford Companion to Fairy Tales (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature
Length:
138 words

..., Rudyard ( 1865–1936 ) English author who used Puck to introduce the characters from the past in Puck of Pook’s Hill ( 1906 ) and Rewards and Fairies ( 1910 ). Two children, Dan and Una, are acting scenes from A Midsummer Night’s Dream in a fairy ring on Midsummer’s Eve, when they find they have conjured up ‘a small, brown, broad-shouldered, pointy-eared person’. He is the last of the Old Things who once were pagan gods and then became the People of the Hills; he is contemptuous of the word ‘fairy’—‘little buzz-flies with butterfly wings and...

Kipling, Rudyard

Kipling, Rudyard (1865–1936)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to English Literature (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature
Length:
597 words

..., Rudyard ( 1865–1936 ) Author and poet , born in Bombay (Mumbai), son of John Lockwood Kipling, author and illustrator of Beast and Man in India ( 1891 ), and Alice Kipling, sister‐in‐law of Edward Burne‐Jones . He was brought to England in 1871 , where he spent five years living unhappily with a family in Southsea with his younger sister, separated from his parents, a period recalled with bitterness in his short story ‘Baa, Baa, Black Sheep’ ( 1888 ) and his novel The Light That Failed ( 1890 ). From 1878 to 1882 he attended the United...

Kipling, Rudyard

Kipling, Rudyard   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Edwardian Fiction

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

..., Rudyard [ Joseph Rudyard Kipling ] ( 1865–1936 ) married ( 1892 ) Caroline Starr Balestier ( 1862–1939 ). Born in Bombay, the son of a designer and museum official, he was educated at the United Service College, Westward Ho!. Both parents were the children of Methodist ministers; they themselves were Anglican. Of his mother's sisters Georgiana Macdonald ( 1840–1920 ) married Sir Edward Burne-Jones ( 1833–1898 ); Agnes Macdonald ( 1843–1906 ) married Sir Edward Poynter ( 1836–1919 ); and Louisa Macdonald ( 1845–1925 ) wrote novels and was...

Kipling, Rudyard

Kipling, Rudyard   Reference library

Harry Ricketts

The Oxford Companion to New Zealand Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature
Length:
222 words

..., Rudyard ( 1865–1936 ), the major English short story writer , novelist and poet , visited New Zealand in October– November 1891 . His visit, vividly recalled in his posthumously published autobiography, Something of Myself ( 1937 ), resulted in two stories, ‘One Lady at Wairakei’ and ‘Mrs Bathurst’, and the well-known quatrain on Auckland, beginning ‘Last, loneliest, loveliest, exquisite, apart’ (‘The Song of the English’, 1893 ). ‘One Lady at Wairakei’, first published in the New Zealand Herald on 30 January 1892 , anticipates the major role...

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