You are looking at 1-20 of 2,002 entries  for:

  • All: Ribbonism x
clear all

View:

Overview

ribbon

Subject: History

Ribbons, or laces—narrow strips of fine material such as silk—feature in manuscripts as occasional ties to letters or books.

Ribbonism

Ribbonism   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Irish History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
213 words

...tradesmen, and wage earners. The geography of the movement, extending over the northern counties of Leinster, north Connacht, and most of Ulster, suggests a direct descent from the earlier Defender society. There was also contact with Ribbon lodges in centres of Irish settlement in Great Britain. Like the Defenders, Ribbonism exhibited a strong Catholic sectarianism, combined with some concept of an egalitarian and independent Ireland, to be achieved by armed insurrection. But in practice its adherents seem to have devoted most of their energies to the...

Ribbonism

Ribbonism  

‘Ribbonmen’ are first mentioned, as ‘a new name for U[nited]Irishmen’, in 1811, and the term recurs during most of the 19th century in official accounts of crime and disaffection. Such ...
ribbon

ribbon   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Construction, Surveying and Civil Engineering (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

... Length of flat...

ribbon

ribbon   Reference library

A Dictionary of English Manuscript Terminology 1450–2000

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, History
Length:
22 words

... Ribbons, or laces—narrow strips of fine material such as silk—feature in manuscripts as occasional ties to letters or...

ribbon

ribbon   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
134 words

... 1. Any ribbon-like strip of decoration, or riband . 2. Lead came around pieces of glass in a leaded light . 3. Representations of ribbons binding festoons , garlands , trophies , wreaths, etc. 4. Light timber fixed to the faces of studs forming a continuous tie around the building and supporting the ends of beams in US balloon -frame construction. Compounds include : ribbon-border : narrow bed in a garden (straight or curved) planted with continuous lines of single colours, common in public parks . See border ; ribbon-development :...

ribbon

ribbon   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Idioms (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
52 words

... cut a ( or the ) ribbon perform an opening ceremony, usually by formally cutting a ribbon strung across the entrance to a building, road, etc. cut ( or tear ) something to ribbons 1 cut ( or tear) something so badly that only ragged strips remain. 2 damage something...

ribbon

ribbon   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Computer Science (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

...of ribbon life. Nylon ribbons can be continually reused until print quality is unacceptable due to ink depletion. The printer recycles such a ribbon continuously, either by use of a continuous loop or by reversing it at each end. With film ribbons a much greater proportion of the ink is transferred at each strike, leading to shorter ribbon life. They can however provide much better print quality than fabric ribbons. Degree of inking in a ribbon is a carefully controlled parameter. Thermal transfer printers also require a ribbon, in this case a film ribbon...

Ribbon

Ribbon   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

... Ribbon development Single-depth building, chiefly houses, along main roads extending out of built-up areas. Such development was banned by the Town and Country Planning Act of 1947 . Ribbonism The activities and aims of the Ribbon or Riband societies, secret Irish Catholic associations flourishing from c. 1820 to 1870 and at their peak in 1835–55 . Ribbonism began in ulster to defend Catholics against orangemen , but spread south and by the 1830s was essentially agrarian. Its character and methods varied somewhat from district to district. It was...

ribbons

ribbons   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Geology and Earth Sciences (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

... Straight to sinuous, thin bodies of sand , with a narrow width in relation to their length. Sand ribbons develop on sediment -poor, tide-swept shelves ( see shelf ), oriented parallel to the tidal stream. The term is also used more generally to describe the large-scale geometry of a preserved sandbody with a width to length ratio in excess of 1:100, and a thickness to width ratio greater than...

ribbons

ribbons   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

... . In the 1990s, a fashion arose for wearing a small loop of coloured ribbon on one's lapel to declare support for some suffering or victimized group. The first and best known is the red Aids Awareness ribbon launched in New York in 1991 , and almost immediately adopted in Britain. It was quickly followed by pink or blue ones for cancer victims, and then by others for various political causes: yellow ones to demand the release of hostages or those unjustly imprisoned, again on an American model; green in support of Irish political prisoners; purple for...

ribbons

ribbons   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Ecology (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... Straight to sinuous, long, narrow, thin bodies of sand that develop on sediment-poor, tide-swept shelves ( see shelf ), oriented parallel to the tidal stream. More generally, the large-scale geometry of a preserved sand-body with a width-to-length ratio in excess of 1 : 100 and a thickness-to-width ratio greater than 1 :...

tripartite ribbons

tripartite ribbons   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Genetics (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
5 words

...ribbons synaptonemal complexes ( q.v....

ribbon cable

ribbon cable   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Computer Science (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

... cable An electric cable in which a number of individual cables are formed into a flat ribbon, sometimes colour-coded to facilitate...

sash ribbon

sash ribbon   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Construction, Surveying and Civil Engineering (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

...ribbon A thin band of steel used to support the sash balance...

sand ribbon

sand ribbon   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Geology and Earth Sciences (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

...ribbon Longitudinal strip of sand up to 15 km long, 200 m wide and less than 1m thick, standing on, and surrounded by, an immobile gravel floor. Sand ribbons are developed on the sea floor of the continental shelf where there are a paucity of sand, water depths of 20–100 m, and fast-flowing currents. See ribbons...

ribbon microphone

ribbon microphone   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Electronics and Electrical Engineering (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... microphone A microphone that consists of a very thin ribbon of aluminium alloy a few millimetres wide loosely fixed in a strong magnetic flux density parallel to the plane of the strip. A sound wave incident on the ribbon causes a pressure difference to be established between the front and back edges of the ribbon and it therefore experiences a force. The resultant motion causes a corresponding e.m.f. to be induced in the ribbon ( see electromagnetic induction ). If the acoustic path difference across the ribbon is much smaller than a quarter...

ribbon synapse

ribbon synapse   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Biomedicine (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019

...ribbon synapse A structurally distinct synapse found in a variety of sensory receptor cells where transmitter is continuously released in response to small graded changes in potential, rather than by an action potential. Synaptic vesicles are attached to the presynaptic membrane in dense bars or ribbons and there may be multivesicular release. The ribbon-specific proteins ribeye and bassoon are responsible for the physical integrity of the photoreceptor ribbon...

Ribbon reed

Ribbon reed   Reference library

The Grove Dictionary of Musical Instruments (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Music
Length:
169 words

...Ribbon reed . Term used by Hornbostel and Sachs for a reed in the form of a stretched band or ribbon against which the airstream is directed, for example a leaf or blade of grass held at two ends before the mouth and blown edgewise (a ‘free’ ribbon reed, usually discarded after use). Within narrow limits, changing the air speed or the tension of the stretched reed can alter the resulting pitch. The Kwakiutl people of British Columbia blew a thin, flexible strip of bark held in a carved wooden enclosure (a ‘mounted’ ribbon reed, more durable than the free...

Ribbon sign

Ribbon sign   Reference library

A-Z of Plastic Surgery

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Medicine and health, Surgery
Length:
34 words

... sign • Curled up arteries lying proximally. • May get faint red streaks on amputated digit (Chinese red lines). • Suggest the arteries have been avulsed distally and are a poor prognostic...

ribbon board

ribbon board   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Construction, Surveying and Civil Engineering (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

... board ( ledger ) A horizontal beam that is fixed to a wall or onto timber studs to provide support for floor or ceiling beams to rest...

View: