You are looking at 1-20 of 2,827 entries  for:

  • All: Rhodes x
clear all

Did you mean Cecil Rhodes Cecil Rhodes

View:

Overview

Rhodes

The largest of the Dodecanese Islands in the SE Aegean, which in the late Bronze Age became a significant trading nation and dominant power; its capital, Rhodes, a port on the northernmost ...

Translations

Translations   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Bible

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Religion
Length:
21,966 words

...Moses Arragel , and is remarkable for combining Jewish and Christian exegetical lore in its commentary. Scripture versions in Catalan are known from references in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries, but the earliest surviving copies are from the fifteenth century. Erroll F. Rhodes English Language Beginnings. As was the case with other languages, the translation of the scriptures into English was at first an oral process. The Venerable Bede tells how Caedmon (seventh century CE ) retold Bible stories in alliterative verses in Anglo‐Saxon: “He sang...

Rhodes

Rhodes   Quick reference

World Maps

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...Rhodes map of ...

Rhodes

Rhodes   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
100 words

... ( Ródhos ) Greek island in the se Aegean Sea; the largest of the Dodecanese archipelago. It was colonized by the Dorians in c .1000 bc and later conquered (at different times) by Persia, Sparta, Athens, Macedon, Rome, and the Byzantine Empire. In 1310 the Knights Hospitallers captured Rhodes, and they defended it against the Turks for more than 200 years. It was finally seized by the Ottomans in 1522 . Ceded to Italy in 1912 , it became part of Greece in 1947 . The chief city is Rhodes. Products: wheat, tobacco, cotton, olives, fruits,...

Rhodes

Rhodes   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
600 words

... Pertusi p.79) describes Rhodes as located in the middle of the theme of Kibyrrhaiotai . Al-Masʿūdī ( Vasiliev , Byz.Arabes 2.2:39) mentions, under the year 943/4, an arsenal and shipbuilding activity on Rhodes. A seal of 695/6 (Zacos, Seals 1, no.189) refers to the apotheke of Asia, Caria, Lycia, Rhodes, and Cherronesos (in Caria?). The administration of the island, according to a seal of the 10th–11th C., was in the hands of an archon ( G. Schlumberger , Mélanges d'archéologie , vol. 1 [Paris 1895 ] 207, no.16). Rhodes was a naval station during...

Rhodes

Rhodes   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
368 words

...a federal state , Rhodes. The reason for this decision was probably commercial rather than military. Existing alongside the new federal capital (also called Rhodes) built on the northern tip of the island in Ialysian territory, the cities retained autonomy in local civic and religious matters and continued to be inhabited. Rhodes suffered political turbulence for most of the 4th cent., but flourished in the age of the Diadochi . The foundation of new cities in the east meant the transfer of trade to the eastern Mediterranean, and Rhodes with its five...

Rhodes

Rhodes   Quick reference

A Dictionary of the Bible (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Religion
Length:
48 words

... Island off SW Asia Minor. Paul passed it on the way by sea from * Ephesus to * Tyre (Acts 21: 1). At one time the island was an independent republic with extensive commercial enterprises, and its own navy, but its prestige and wealth were diminished under Roman...

Rhodes

Rhodes (Greece)   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Place Names (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019

...Rhodes ( Ródos ) , Greece An island and its capital. The name may be derived from the Phoenician erod ‘snake’ in recognition of the fact that the island used to be infested with snakes. Alternatively, it may come from the Greek ródon ‘rose’. It is the site of one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, the Colossus of Rhodes, a bronze statue more than 100 feet (30 m) high dedicated to the sun god Helios to commemorate the raising of a long siege. It was built in c. 292–280 bc , but was destroyed by an earthquake c. 224 bc . Occupied by many...

Rhodes

Rhodes   Reference library

Christopher B. Mee and Ellen E. Rice

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
1,293 words

...divided among the three old cities. Rhodes became a member of the Second Athenian Confederacy in 378 / 7 , but was detached from it by the intervention of the Carian satrap Mausolus , eager to extend his influence into the Aegean. The Social War (1) against Athens broke out in 357 and Rhodes was granted independence, only to suffer Carian domination until the arrival of Alexander (3) the Great in 332 . Relations with Alexander are obscure, but an unpopular Macedonian garrison was installed on Rhodes. Rhodes flourished in the age of the ...

Rhodes

Rhodes   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
825 words

... The largest island of the Dodecanese, Rhodes lies in the Aegean off the coast of modern Turkey (ancient Caria) between Cyprus and mainland Greece. As early as the Bronze Age, Rhodes was an important crossroads. A Cretan (Minoan) settlement at Trianda on the northwest coast may have served as a commercial hub linking Crete with the eastern Mediterranean. Colonists from mainland Greece later came to live on the island, leaving characteristic Mycenaean tomb types and grave offerings. According to tradition, Dorian Greeks settled Rhodes in the aftermath of the...

Rhodes

Rhodes   Reference library

Christopher B. Mee and Ellen E. Rice

The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
1,124 words

...among the three old cities. Rhodes became a member of the Second Athenian Confederacy ( see athens (history) ) in 378 /7, but was detached from it by the intervention of the Carian satrap Mausolus, eager to extend his influence into the Aegean. The Social War against Athens broke out in 357 and Rhodes was granted independence, only to suffer Carian domination until the arrival of Alexander the Great in 332 . Relations with Alexander are obscure, but an unpopular Macedonian garrison was installed on Rhodes. Rhodes flourished in the age of the...

Rhodes

Rhodes   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Classical Literature (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Classical studies
Length:
339 words

...by Demetrius Poliorcetes (‘Besieger’) of Macedonia; the Colossus of Rhodes was erected to commemorate the successful defence of the city. Rhodes was associated with Pergamum in a policy of friendship to Rome in the early second century bc , but it soon roused the jealousy of Rome by its independent attitude. Its trade was also severely damaged by the Roman free port of Delos , and sank into relative insignificance. The capital was captured and pillaged by Cassius in 43 bc . Rhodes was a considerable literary centre; it was the birthplace of Panaetius ...

Rhodes

Rhodes   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Classical Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Classical studies
Length:
2,943 words
Illustration(s):
3

... bc and incorporated into the Roman Empire under Vespasian ( reg ad 69–79 ), Rhodes retained its reputation as a beautiful city and centre of learning. It had a bishop at an early date. Its strategic and economic importance increased from ad 330 after the establishment of Constantinople (now Istanbul ) , the eastern capital of the empire. In ad 395 Rhodes became part of the eastern empire. Rhodes 1. Map of Rhodes Dictionary of Art A. Gabriel : La Cité de Rhodes , 2 vols (Paris, 1921–3) C. Papachristodoulou : Istoria tis Rodou apo tous pro...

Rhodes

Rhodes   Reference library

Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
146 words

... Situated at the crossroads of the two great axes of the East Mediterranean, north-south from Constantinople to Alexandria , west-east from Rome to Palestine , metropolis of the eparchy of the Cyclades, it enjoyed great prosperity in the early Christian period. Taken in 654 by the Arabs, pillaged numerous times in the 8th c., it was integrated into the Empire's new defensive system and attached to the theme of the Kibbyrheotes. It regained its prosperity in the late 11th c., with the recovery of large-scale maritime commerce . Made a duchy in ...

Rhodes

Rhodes   Quick reference

Neil Morris

Dictionary Plus Social Sciences

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Social sciences
Length:
94 words

...Rhodes ( Ródhos ) A Greek island in the south-east Aegean Sea, off the Turkish coast, the largest of the Dodecanese islands. Its main city is also named Rhodes. Colonized by the Dorians around 1000 bc , the island was subsequently conquered in turn by Persia, Sparta, Athens, Rome, and the Byzantines. It was captured by the Knights Hospitaller in 1310 and the Ottoman Turks in 1523 , becoming part of Greece in 1947 . It is a popular tourist destination, and main products include wine, wheat, and figs. Area 1,400 km 2 . Population ( 2011 ) 119,800....

Rhodes, David

Rhodes, David (1777)   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
78 words

..., David ( d 1777 ). English pottery and porcelain enameller . In about 1760 he established a workshop in Leeds with Jasper Robinson , where they enamelled cream-coloured earthenware from the Leeds Pottery and salt-glazed stoneware from Staffordshire potteries. In 1763 Rhodes bought out Robinson, who continued to work for the firm that continued to be known as Robinson & Rhodes. In 1768 Rhodes moved to London to work in Wedgwood ’s studio, of which he became the manager in 1770...

Rhodes, Richard

Rhodes, Richard (1765)   Reference library

Benezit Dictionary of British Graphic Artists and Illustrators

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

..., Richard British , 18th – 19th century, male. Born 1765 ; died 1 November 1838 , in Camden Town (London). Engraver (burin)...

Rhodes, Harold

Rhodes, Harold (28 Dec 1910)   Reference library

Hugh Davies

The Grove Dictionary of American Music (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Music, Social sciences, Regional and Area Studies
Length:
495 words

...company to Harold Rhodes in 1997 for legal reasons. The innovative Rhodes Piano Method was initiated in 1990 , and Rhodes received a Grammy award in 1996 in recognition of his achievements in music education, and also for the invention of his electric piano. Joseph A. Brandstetter acquired the rights to the Rhodes trademarks and established a new Rhodes Music Corporation, which introduced in 2007 the Rhodes Mark 7, based on an original Rhodes electric piano. See also Electric piano ; Electronic instruments . Bibliography J.H.M. Goddijn : Groot...

Rhodes, Cecil

Rhodes, Cecil (1853–1902)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of World History (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History
Length:
126 words

..., Cecil ( John ) ( 1853–1902 ) British-born South African statesman, Prime Minister of Cape Colony ( 1890–96 ) . He went to South Africa in 1870 , where he became a successful diamond prospector, and 20 years later owned 90% of the world’s production of diamonds. Entering politics in 1881 , he expanded British territory in southern Africa, annexing Bechuanaland (now Botswana) in 1884 and developing Rhodesia from 1889 onwards through the British South Africa Company, which he founded. While Premier, Rhodes was implicated in the Jameson Raid...

Rhodes, Cecil

Rhodes, Cecil (1853–1902)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of African Politics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019

...Rhodes, Cecil ( 1853–1902 ) A British businessman and passionate imperialist who served as the prime minister of the Cape Colony (a British colony in what is now South Africa) from 1890 to 1896 . Cecil John Rhodes entered the diamond trade aged just 18, having been sent to South Africa as a child for his health. In 1888 , he founded the company De Beers, which continues to operate today. The same year, Rhodes was elected to the Cape Parliament and his Central Search Association merged with London-based Exploring Company Ltd to form the British...

Rhodes, Cecil

Rhodes, Cecil   Quick reference

A Dictionary of British History (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
74 words

..., Cecil ( 1853–1902 ). Imperialist and capitalist . In 1870 Rhodes went to Natal to help his brother grow cotton, but amassed a huge fortune in diamonds and gold. He became prime minister of the Cape in 1890 ; opened up the country north of the Limpopo, modestly naming it Rhodesia ; and was involved in the Jameson Raid . When he died, his final will provided for a series of scholarships to...

View: