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Restoration

(1660) The re-establishment in England and Scotland of the Stuart monarchy by placing Charles II, the exiled son of Charles I, on the throne. The Restoration was accompanied by ...

restoration

restoration   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
3 words

... See conservation...

restoration

restoration n.((in dentistry))   Quick reference

Concise Medical Dictionary (10 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Medicine and health, Clinical Medicine
Length:
47 words

... n. (in dentistry) any type of dental filling or crown , which is aimed at restoring a tooth to its normal form, function, and appearance. A sealant restoration (or preventive resin restoration ) is a combination of a fissure sealant and a small...

Restoration

Restoration   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
32 words

... . Term that refers to the period from the restoration of King Charles II to the throne of England in 1660 to the advent of the William and Mary style in 1688...

restoration

restoration   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Dentistry (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Medicine and health, Dentistry
Length:
127 words

...restoration n. A generic term used to describe any filling, inlay , crown , bridge , implant , or removable prosthesis which replaces lost tooth tissue and restores form, function, or aesthetics. A direct restoration is a restoration prepared for immediate placement in the mouth, such as an amalgam or resin composite, and does not require any external fabrication. An indirect restoration is a restoration fabricated outside the mouth. A provisional restoration is a temporary restoration intended to restore either aesthetics or function, or both,...

Restoration

Restoration   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
56 words

... The restoration of the monarchy in 1660 after the Civil War and Commonwealth . Contemporary records date the start of the reign of Charles II not from 1660 but from the execution of his father, Charles I , in 1649 . See the account of the events leading up to the Restoration in the diary of Samuel Pepys...

Restoration

Restoration   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Local and Family History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
39 words

... . The restoration of the monarchy in 1660 after the Civil War and Commonwealth . Contemporary records date the start of the reign of Charles II not from 1660 but from the execution of his father, Charles I , in 1649...

restoration

restoration   Reference library

Garner's Modern English Usage (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
33 words

... ; ⋆restoral . The former has been standard since it was first used in the late 1300s. The latter is a needless variant . Current ratio in print ( restoration vs. ⋆ restoral ): 3,529:1 ...

restoration

restoration   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Food and Nutrition (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

... The addition of nutrients to replace those lost in processing, as in milling of cereals. See also fortification...

restoration

restoration   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Construction, Surveying and Civil Engineering (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

... The repair, cleaning, and structural improvement of an item to bring it back to as close to its original condition as...

restoration

restoration   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Environment and Conservation (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

... The act of restoring, renovating, or re‐establishing something to close to its original condition, such as the structure and function of a damaged habitat or ecosystem...

Restoration

Restoration   Reference library

Gretel VAN WIEREN

Berkshire Encyclopedia of Sustainability

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Science and technology, Social sciences
Length:
830 words

... Restoration Ecological restoration is the attempt to repair ecosystems that have been damaged or degraded, most often by past human activities. The modern science of ecological restoration (called restoration ecology ) includes a variety of fields and disciplines: conservation biology, geography/landscape ecology, wetland management, adaptive ecosystem management, and rehabilitation of resource-extracted lands ( Higgs 2003 ). Restoration projects are varied and wide-ranging and include the following examples: the reintroduction of tall grass prairie...

Restoration

Restoration   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Architecture (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2021
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
89 words

... The re-establishment (1660) of the Stuart Monarchy in Great Britain and Ireland, so the period following this event, later in the reign of King Charles II (1660–85) referred to as the Carolean period. Restoration architecture was strongly influenced by Continental fashion, the dominant style being Baroque derived from French and Netherlandish precedents. Typical Restoration buildings were the symmetrical houses of Pratt and Hugh May , the grander works of Talman , and the great contribution of Wren , whose chief sources were French and...

restoration

restoration ([De])   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Archaeology (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2021
Subject:
Archaeology
Length:
91 words

... [De] Literally, the act of restoring something that already exists to a former position or state. In archaeology this typically means dismantling a structure or taking an artefact apart, cleaning the component parts, replacing or strengthening broken or weak elements, and then reassembling the whole in its original order or form. It is often a matter of degree as to whether an operation is really restoration or reconstruction, although the extremes are easy to see. The aim of restoration is mainly conservation through the protection and preservation...

Restoration

Restoration (1660)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of World History (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History
Length:
86 words

... ( 1660 ) The re-establishment in England, Scotland, and Ireland of the Stuart monarchy by placing Charles II, the exiled son of Charles I, on the throne. The Restoration was accompanied by the revival of the Church of England, the growth of Cavalier fortunes (although those who had sold their estates to pay fines could not get them back), and a flourishing cultural and social life. The Restoration did not restore the absolute authority of the Stuart monarchy, as Charles II was soon to...

Restoration

Restoration   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
153 words

...of the arrears in the army's wages and religious toleration. He was invited by a new Parliament to resume the throne. The term Restoration is often extended to the period following 1660 , and is especially associated with a flowering of English literature, notably in Restoration drama . In French history, it refers to the restoration of the Bourbons ( 1814–30 ) after the defeat of...

Restoration

Restoration   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Literature
Length:
216 words

... The re-establishment of monarchy in England, with the return of Charles II ( 1660 ); also the period marked by this event of which the chief literary figures are John Dryden , John Wilmot, earl of Rochester , John Bunyan , Samuel Pepys , John Locke , and the Restoration dramatists. One of the characteristic genres of the period is Restoration comedy, or the comedy of manners, which developed upon the reopening of the theatres. Its principal writers were William Congreve , Sir George Etherege , George Farquhar , Sir John Vanbrugh , and ...

Restoration

Restoration   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Italian Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
107 words

... . The term refers both to the territorial and political settlement of 1814–15 ending Napoleonic government in Italy, and to the period before the 1848 revolution. Most of the old dynasties were restored, as were many of the pre- 1792 boundaries. Hence the Restoration period is usually associated with ill-considered attempts to return to the ancien régime and with a short-sighted intolerance of political and religious freedoms. In reality, however, reaction was short-lived and confined to Piedmont , Modena, and a few other states. Elsewhere,...

restoration

restoration   Quick reference

A Dictionary of the Bible (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Religion
Length:
113 words

... In the NT the concept is of putting things in order. * John the Baptist (in the role of the new * Elijah ) has done that (Mark 9: 12), in the sense of having accomplished his mission successfully. The writer to the Hebrews (Heb. 13: 19) hopes to be ‘restored’ to the readers, either by being released from prison, or perhaps by a simple return visit. The idea of a ‘universal restoration’ (Acts 3: 21) when God will re-establish the whole cosmos to its initial state of perfection (Rom. 8: 21) is expressed in terms of a new * heaven and a new earth...

restoration

restoration   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Architecture (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2021
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
390 words

... Process of carrying on alterations/repairs to a building or landscape-garden to restore them to their original forms, often involving reinstatement of missing or badly damaged parts, so usually includes replication (new work in an old style). While often necessary after a disaster, it is generally regarded as more drastic than conservation , which suggests retention/repair/maintenance. Wyatt ’s interventions at Hereford (1788–96), Salisbury (1789–92), and Durham (from 1794) Cathedrals were so ruthless that they provoked antiquarian outrage (mostly ...

Restoration

Restoration   Reference library

J. R. Jones

The Oxford Companion to British History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
292 words

... . The restoration of the monarchy in 1660 was due more to the failure of alternative republican regimes than to the efforts of loyalists. An army junta dispersed the Rump Parliament in October 1659 but failed to rally civilian support. Dissident garrison soldiers restored the Rump and General Monck invaded England with the army of occupation in Scotland. He quickly realized that the Rump no longer possessed the consent of the nation; he therefore restored the MPs who had been excluded from the Commons in 1648 , on condition that they...

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