View:

Overview

Progressive Era

Many black women made formidable advancements in their education, professional lives, and leadership roles during the Progressive Era. At the same time, black women experienced what has ...

Progressive Era

Progressive Era   Reference library

Robert M. Crunden

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Political and Legal History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics, Law, History of Law
Length:
2,051 words

... Era The Progressive Era takes its name from the Progressive Party of 1912 – 1924 and from the general feeling both at the time and in subsequent histories that the early years of the twentieth century were focused on a coherent body of democratic reforms that changed important aspects of the American political system. Interpretations of the Progressive Era have undergone many changes. Autobiographies and early histories stressed the return to popular control over political actions and the gradual shift from local to state to national authority. The...

Progressive Era.

Progressive Era.   Reference library

Robert M. Crunden

The Oxford Companion to United States History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
1,983 words

...Progressive Era. The Progressive Era takes its name from the Progressive party of 1912–1924 and from the general feeling both at the time and in subsequent histories that the early years of the twentieth century were focused on a coherent body of democratic reforms that changed important aspects of the American political system. Interpretations of the Progressive Era have undergone many changes. Autobiographies and early histories stressed the return to popular control over political actions and the gradual shift from local to state to national authority....

Progressive Era

Progressive Era   Reference library

Robert D. Johnston and Robert M. Crunden

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Social History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

... Era The Progressive Era takes its name from the Progressive Party (founded in 1912 ) and from the general feeling both at the time and in subsequent histories that the early years of the twentieth century were focused on a coherent body of democratic reforms that changed important aspects of the American political system and brought “progressive” modernity to American society. Interpretations of the Progressive Era have undergone many changes. Autobiographies and early histories stressed the return to popular control over corrupt politicians and...

Progressive Era

Progressive Era   Reference library

Black Women in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
5,593 words
Illustration(s):
2

... Era Many black women made formidable advancements in their education, professional lives, and leadership roles during the Progressive Era. At the same time, black women experienced what has been referred to as the nadir of black history—systematic discrimination and segregation through Jim Crow laws and virulent violence, including lynching. This essay discusses black women’s lives from 1890 to 1920 , with attention to differences in social class, nativity, educational and occupational attainment, and church and organizational affiliations. Social...

Progressive Era Writing

Progressive Era Writing   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Women's Writing in the United States

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
1,371 words

... Era Writing . The period in United States history commonly referred to as the Progressive Era, the last decade of the nineteenth century and first two to two-and-a-half decades of the twentieth, witnesses an extraordinary production of literature by women. Writing and publishing fiction during these years were Frances Ellen Harper , Charlotte Perkins Gilman , Alice Dunbar-Nelson , Kate Chopin , Amelia Johnson , Emma Kelley-Hawkins, Sarah Orne Jewett , Pauline Hopkins , Zitkala-Ša , Edith Wharton , Mary Austin , Ellen Glasgow ,...

Feminist Reforms in the Progressive Era, Maternal

Feminist Reforms in the Progressive Era, Maternal   Reference library

Elisabeth Israels Perry

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Social History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...Reforms in the Progressive Era, Maternal The term “maternal feminism” describes the social outlook of Progressive Era feminist reformers who based their ideals on archetypal notions of motherhood. As feminists, these reformers advocated the goals of the contemporary women’s movement, such as woman suffrage and access for women to higher education and careers. But as women who idealized motherhood they promoted a larger social vision of a government more active in caring for its citizens. They were especially concerned about women and girls, whose sexual...

Gilded Age and Progressive Era, U.S. Military and Diplomatic Affairs during the

Gilded Age and Progressive Era, U.S. Military and Diplomatic Affairs during the   Reference library

Lloyd E. Ambrosius

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Military and Diplomatic History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...Age and Progressive Era, U.S. Military and Diplomatic Affairs during the During the Gilded Age and Progressive Era ( 1877–1920 ), the United States emerged as one of the world's great powers. It made the historic transition from the so-called American isolationism of the nineteenth century to President Woodrow Wilson 's liberal internationalism during World War I. Leaders in all countries, whether global empires or small states, regarded Wilson as the preeminent statesman at the Paris Peace Conference of 1919 . Anticolonial nationalists looked to him as...

Progressive Era

Progressive Era  

Many black women made formidable advancements in their education, professional lives, and leadership roles during the Progressive Era. At the same time, black women experienced what has been referred ...
Progressive Era Writing

Progressive Era Writing  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
The period in United States history commonly referred to as the Progressive Era, the last decade of the nineteenth century and first two to two-and-a-half decades of the twentieth, witnesses ...
Progressives and Progressivism in an Era of Reform

Progressives and Progressivism in an Era of Reform   Reference library

Maureen A. Flanagan

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Urban History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
History, Contemporary History (post 1945)
Length:
10,414 words

...in 1922 . At Roosevelt’s behest, Congress tightened requirements for naturalization. Wartime fever and the 1919 Red Scare intensified the search for 100 percent Americanism and undermined the alternative Progressive ideal of a cooperative Americanism. 81 Progressivism beyond the Progressive Era The democratizing ideals of the Progressive Era lived beyond the time period. A regulatory state to eliminate the worst effects of capitalism was created, as most Americans accepted that the federal state had to take on more social responsibility. After...

Prose

Prose   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
4,185 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

... he was omitting such confident claims for its progressive powers and investing new hopes in the minor and maligned genre of prose fiction. Meanwhile, anti-Jacobin writers like T. J. *Mathias had begun to put pressure upon the hitherto unproblematic category of ‘literature’ by issuing widely read and reprinted demands that it expose its political and national allegiances. His polemic in the voluminous footnotes to the satiric poem The Pursuits of Literature ( 1794–8 ) campaigned to discredit the progressive political and intellectual culture sustained by...

Consumerism

Consumerism   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
3,809 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...as a consumer of sensory inputs. Such a persona would thus need to absorb all possible ‘goods’ in order to become a whole and progressive individual. Thus Enlightenment empiricism and Romantic introspective individualism rationalized and legitimated the consumer in terms of the self-creation of mankind. MacPherson's and Campbell's formulations are valuable, since the creation of a consumer mentality in the Georgian and Romantic eras involved massive ideological work in overcoming not only the traditional Christian suspicion of greed, envy, gluttony, and the...

Enlightenment

Enlightenment   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
7,794 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...a Brahmin, and a Citizen of the World. However, such untroubled multiple identities sustained within a broad enlightened frame-work could not easily survive the crisis engendered in Britain by the *French Revolution . Perhaps significantly, this first public fracture in progressive rational ideology began with a bitter controversy between a liberal Protestant Welshman, Richard *Price , and an orthodox Protestant Irishman of strong Catholic sympathies and affiliations, Edmund *Burke , both of whom lived in London—a natural centre for enlightened culture...

17 Bookbinding

17 Bookbinding   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
5,252 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
9

...binding quickly became established as the standard technique. Whole editions of books therefore began to be issued in identical bindings, another major change from the practice of the handpress era. These essential structural features of casebound books have continued largely unchanged to the present time, although the processes involved have undergone progressive mechanization (see section 8, below). While many ‘hardback’ books still conform to this style, modern books often rely on glue rather than sewing to hold them together, an alternative (and cheaper)...

20a The History of the Book in Britain, c.1475–1800

20a The History of the Book in Britain, c.1475–1800   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
6,011 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...Cooke and James Harrison , to enter the field with competitively priced series of their own. As a result books became cheaper, and a much wider range of works became available to the less well-off sectors of society (although St Clair has argued that this range narrowed progressively as the limits on copyright were extended over time). One other legacy of the 1710 Copyright Act was the formalization of the entitlement of certain libraries to receive copies of new publications without charge—and this was not altered by the 1774 Lords’ decision. Where...

20c The History of the Book in Britain from 1914

20c The History of the Book in Britain from 1914   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
3,991 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...by the materials produced by publishing companies. Throughout the course of the century, the legislative framework and judicial activity surrounding the content of books underwent radical changes with the gradual arrival of a more permissive society. However, although bold and progressive publishers such as *Calder & Boyars continually pushed at social and political boundaries, the courts’ role in censorship and publishers’ attendant fear of prosecution meant that material about certain topics still struggled to be disseminated. The Lady Chatterley trial...

27 The History of the Book in the Iberian Peninsula

27 The History of the Book in the Iberian Peninsula   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
6,196 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...Spanish publishing at *Seix Barral and introduced the Latin American Boom writers at *Alfaguara . Alianza Editorial (with its pocket editions designed by Daniel Gil), Siglo XX, Taurus, and Cuadernos para el Diálogo, were all symbols of progressive quality of popular publishing in the late Francoist era. Bibliography A. Anselmo , Origens da imprensa em Portugal (1981) — História da edição em Portugal , 1 Das origens até 1536 (1991) P. Berger , Libro y lectura en la Valencia del Renacimiento (1987) Bibliografia Geral Portuguesa, Século XV (2...

Religion

Religion   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,549 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...England about the doctrine of the Trinity, but it was only in the early eighteenth century that the so-called Arian view that Jesus was created and that His divinity was subordinate to that of God the Father began to penetrate Dissent and after mid-century to grow among more progressive thinkers, again chiefly Presbyterians, into insistence on the fully human nature of Jesus (the doctrine of Socinianism). These heterodox tendencies, nourished in a few of the *Dissenting academies that had grown up to educate young men excluded by their Dissent from the...

38 The History of the Book in the Muslim World

38 The History of the Book in the Muslim World   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
13,110 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
4

...for further Muslim editions. This demand was partly met by subsequent lithographed versions in Iran, India, and Turkey. In Egypt, the impetus of modernization created a tension between conservatives, who abhorred the idea of profaning God’s words with movable types, and more progressive religious educators who wanted to place a copy of the Qur’ān, if not in the hands of every Muslim, then at least of every college pupil. Some attempts were made to publish the text in the 1830s , but the distribution of copies was successfully blocked by the religious...

39 The History of the Book in the Indian Subcontinent

39 The History of the Book in the Indian Subcontinent   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
10,044 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...books outside government and missionary circles. His ‘pioneering efforts to publish sacred and “popular” precolonial texts illustrated many trends that were to characterise the emerging sphere of vernacular production’ (Naregal, 185). Bhau Mahājan’s Prabhakar Press printed progressive periodicals such as the Prabhakar and the Dhumketu . The task of typographical reform, on the other hand, was carried on by Jāvjī Dādājī , who had started his career by working at the *American Mission Press , and later joined the staff of the Indu-Prakash Press. In 1864 ...

View: