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Pompey

(106–48bc), Roman general and statesman, known as Pompey the Great. He founded the First Triumvirate, but later quarrelled with Julius Caesar, who defeated him at the battle of ...

‘Pompey’

‘Pompey’   Reference library

Anne Button

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...Pompey’ . Costard takes the part of Pompey the Great (Cn. Pompeius Magnus, 106–48 bc ) in the performance of ‘The Nine Worthies’, Love’s Labour’s Lost 5.2. Anne...

Pompey

Pompey   Reference library

Anne Button

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... . Mistress Overdone’s servant, he is interrogated by Elbow and Escalus, Measure for Measure , giving his full name as Pompey Bum (2.1.205–7). He later becomes Abhorson’s assistant (4.2.14–17). Anne...

Pompey

Pompey   Reference library

Concise Oxford Dictionary of Family Names in Britain

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2021
Subject:
Names studies
Length:
29 words

... 1881: 37; Somerset, Gloucs, and Berks; Sussex. English: of uncertain origin. It might be an altered form of Pumfrey , with simplification of the consonant cluster -mfr- to -mp-...

Pompey

Pompey   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...ball, one of them shouteed out ‘Poor old Pompey!’, and a nickname was born. The more prosaic truth may be that ‘Pompey’ is simply an erosion of ‘Portsmouth’, influenced by the name of the Roman general Pompey. A complicating factor in the equation is ‘Paws off, Pompey!’, a colloquial expression from the early 19th century to the 1930s meaning ‘Hands off, leave me alone!’ It was coined around 1803 , without the comma, as ‘Paws off Pompey’, and used as an anti-Napoleonic phrase, meaning ‘Keep your hands off Pompey!’ Pompey here seems to have referred either to ...

Pompey

Pompey   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Companion to Irish Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Literature
Length:
28 words

... ( 1663 ), a version of Pierre Corneille's Mort de Pompée in heroic verse by ‘ Orinda ’ (Katherine Philips ), and the first original play to be presented at Smock Alley...

Pompey

Pompey (106–48 bc)   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
102 words

... ( 106–48 bc ) ( Gnaeus Pompeius ) Roman general. He fought for Sulla in 83 bc and campaigned in Sicily, Africa and Spain. He was named consul with Crassus in 70 bc and fought a notable campaign against Mithridates VI of Pontus in 66 bc . In 59 bc he formed the first triumvirate with Crassus and his great rival, Julius Caesar . After the death of Crassus, Pompey joined Caesar's enemies, and civil war broke out in 49 bc . Driven out of Rome by Caesar's advance, Pompey was defeated at Pharsalus in 48 bc and fled to Egypt, where...

Pompey

Pompey (106–48)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of World History (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History
Length:
80 words

... (or Pompey the Great ; full name Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus ) ( 106–48 bc ) Roman general and statesman . His greatest achievements were the suppression of the Mediterranean pirates ( 66 ), and the defeat of Mithridates in the east ( 63 ). He formed the First Triumvirate with Caesar and Crassus in 60, but disagreement with Caesar resulted in civil war. Pompey was defeated at the battle of Pharsalus, after which he fled to Egypt, where he was...

Pompey

Pompey ([Na])   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Archaeology (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2021
Subject:
Archaeology
Length:
172 words

... [Na] Roman soldier and military commander , born on 30 September 106 bc . When Sulla landed in Italy in 84 bc , Pompey led a considerable force to support him. After Sulla's death in 78 bc , Pompey remained one of the recognized leaders of the senatorial party, whose armies he commanded in Spain in 76–71 bc . In 67 bc he was successful in suppressing the pirates in the Mediterranean, and in 66 bc he overthrew Mithradates, thus bringing the entire east under Roman influence. But after 62 bc his brilliant record became one of...

Pompey

Pompey (106–48 bc) (‘the Great’   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Classical Literature (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Classical studies
Length:
382 words

...of the Senate led Pompey to form an alliance in 59 with Caesar and Crassus (called in modern times ‘the first triumvirate’) and they became in effect rulers of Rome. In 54 the death of Julia (Caesar's daughter who had married Pompey in 59 ) broke the strongest bond between Caesar and Pompey, and in 53 Crassus was killed in Parthia; the triumvirate was ended and Pompey's popularity waned. He was appointed sole consul in 52 after Clodius' murder ( see Caesar (2) ). In 49 civil war began between him and Caesar. Pompey commanded the republican...

Pompey

Pompey (106–48bce)   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
1,947 words
Illustration(s):
1

...His account of Pompey's career can be found in 4.370–452 and 5.107–304.; see especially 4.384–85 and 5.272–73 for his unsympathetic portrait of Pompey. Seager, Robin . Pompey the Great: A Political Biography . 2nd ed. Malden, Mass.: Blackwell, 2002. The most serviceable biography in English of Pompey, but the author focuses narrowly on Pompey's political career, excluding many of his greatest accomplishments in a military capacity. The afterword to this edition contains a brief summary of recent advances in the scholarship on Pompey's career. Geoffrey S....

‘Pompey’

‘Pompey’   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
55 words

...Pompey’ , the British sailors' slang for Portsmouth, the English naval base. It is not known how or when the name came into being, though one theory is that it owes its origin to the fact that the local fire brigade, known by their French name pompiers , used to exercise on Southsea Common, adjacent to...

Pompey

Pompey (106)   Reference library

Guy Edward Farquhar Chilver and Robin J. Seager

The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
1,276 words

...aerarii (a group similar to the equites ). Pompey took no consular province. But in 67 the Gabinian law ( lex Gabinia ) empowered him to deal with piracy . The command, for three years, covered the whole Mediterranean, and gave him unprecedented powers; but Pompey’s campaign required only three months. In 66 a law of the tribune Gaius Manilius gave him the Asiatic provinces of Cilicia, Bithynia, and Pontus, earlier held by Lucius Licinius Lucullus, and the conduct of the war against Mithradates VI . Pompey’s eastern campaigns were his greatest...

Pompey

Pompey (1798–after 1830)   Reference library

Gail Saunders

Dictionary of Caribbean and Afro–Latin American Biography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
1,154 words

... ( 1798–after 1830 ), leader of a slave revolt in The Bahamas , was born in 1798 at Steventon on Great Exuma Island to James, who was African-born, and Hagar, a Creole who was born in the Americas. The eldest child of James and Hagar, Pompey had four brothers and two sisters. Pompey was born into slavery; he had never known freedom. He was the property of Lord John Rolle, of Devon, England, who had inherited at least 5,000 acres of land and about 200 slaves from his father, Denys Rolle. By 1822 , when Pompey was 24 years old, the Rolle slaves lived...

Pompey

Pompey   Reference library

Dictionary of American Family Names (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Names studies
Length:
29 words

... US frequency (2010): 2473 1 Americanized form of Italian Pompei . 2 English: possibly an altered form of Welsh Pumfrey , with simplification of the consonant cluster -mfr- to -mp-...

Pompey, Sextus

Pompey, Sextus (75–35 bc)   Reference library

Anne Button

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

..., Sextus ( Sextus Pompeius ) ( 75–35 bc ) . Son of Pompey the Great, he makes a short-lived treaty with the triumvirs, Antony and Cleopatra 2.6. His defeat by Caesar is announced, 3.5. Anne...

Pompey, Sextus

Pompey, Sextus   Quick reference

Theodore John Cadoux and Robin J. Seager

Who's Who in the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
476 words

..., Sextus ( Sextus Pompeius Magnus Pius ), younger son of Pompey and Mucia Tertia , was born probably c. 67 bc . Left in Lesbos with his stepmother Cornelia during the campaign of Pharsalus ( 48 ), he accompanied his father to Egypt and after his murder went to Africa; after Thapsus ( 46 ) he joined his brother Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus in Spain, and during the campaign of Munda ( 45 ) commanded the garrison of Corduba. Subsequently he contrived to raise an army, partly of fugitive Pompeians, and won successes against Julius Caesar 's governors in...

Caesar and Pompey

Caesar and Pompey   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to English Literature (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature
Length:
70 words

...and Pompey A politically astute Roman tragedy by George Chapman , written 1604 , published 1631 . It deals with the conflict between Caesar and Pompey, the events leading to the battle of Pharsalus ( 48 bc ), the murder of Pompey, and the suicide of Cato of Utica. Cato is the real hero of the play, of which the motto is ‘Only a just man is a free...

Pompey the Great

Pompey the Great ((Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus; 106–48 BCE))   Reference library

duane w. roller

Dictionary of African Biography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
968 words

...became increasingly untenable in 58 BCE, Pompey encouraged him to go into exile, and in fact the king came to Rome and lived in one of Pompey’s villas. Debates continued in the city about the future of Ptolemy’s kingdom, and Pompey fought unsuccessfully for the king’s return. The king moved on to Ephesus, eventually to be restored in 55 BCE by Aulus Gabinius, governor of Syria, and his cavalry commander, Mark Antony. Yet in 52 BCE, when Ptolemy wrote his will, the official Roman copy ended up in the hands of Pompey. In the will Ptolemy named his two eldest...

Pompey ‘the Great’

Pompey ‘the Great’ (106–48 bc)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Military History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...against Sertorius in Spain. Pompey suffered several reverses and felt that he was not receiving sufficient replacements and logistical support from the Senate, but when his rival was assassinated he quickly defeated his less able successor. By 71 it was all over and Pompey returned to Italy, where he took most of the credit for bringing to an end the Gladiators' war , largely won by Crassus . The two of them were elected consuls in the year 70 and Pompey was awarded a triumph for his Spanish conquests. In 67 Pompey was given an extraordinary...

Pompey the Great

Pompey the Great   Quick reference

Guy Edward Farquhar Chilver and Robin J. Seager

Who's Who in the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
1,237 words

..., and tribuni aerarii (a group similar to the equites ). Pompey took no consular province. But in 67 the Gabinian law empowered him to deal with piracy. The command, for three years, covered the whole Mediterranean, and gave him unprecedented powers; but Pompey's campaign required only three months. In 66 a law of the tribune Gaius Manilius gave him the Asiatic provinces of Cilicia, Bithynia, and Pontus, earlier held by Lucullus , and the conduct of the war against Mithradates VI . Pompey's eastern campaigns were his greatest achievement. Mithradates...

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